$10 billion in prescription savings - scriptsave wellrx blog image

ScriptSave WellRx Marks Silver Anniversary –
25 Years of Prescription Savings, Totaling $10 Billion, and a Brand New Innovation to Help Patients Who View Food as Medicine

A new analysis from the prescription discount program, ScriptSave WellRx, has revealed the savings from the company’s pioneering efforts to lower out-of-pocket costs for millions of patients paying cash for their prescriptions. The results: more than $10 billion dollars of savings, as the company marks its Silver Anniversary with the release of a brand new module that can assist patients with their grocery choices.

Founded in 1994, ScriptSave has been a pioneer and innovator, leading the way in terms of creating tools and programs designed to help un- and under-insured patients better afford their medications. Working in close collaboration with many of the nation’s pharmacy and grocery chains, ScriptSave has created incredible savings opportunities for patients.

With the latest update to the ScriptSave WellRx mobile app, ScriptSave has announced a new wellness-focused tool that provides grocery guidance. Using the new tool, consumers can check:

  • ensure the foods they are eating are consistent with their goals for general wellness
  • choose foods better aligned for pregnancy
  • select appropriate foods for other health conditions, including heart health and diabetes.

Users of the app can even find similar food options that are better aligned with their needs. As with most other programs and offerings from ScriptSave, the ScriptSave WellRx app (and the new grocery guidance toolset) is available to users at no cost.

Prescription Savings - ScriptSave WellRx

ScriptSave Never Stops Innovating

scriptsave wellrx food index imageOther pioneering innovations that are also available (free) in the latest app release include:

  • geo-targeted price-drop alerts for prescriptions medications, allowing users to see when the prices for their own medications come down at nearby pharmacies;
  • medication refill and ‘take your pill NOW’ reminders, helping to ensure prescribed medication adherence, and;
  • medication interaction alerts, to flag possible life-threatening drug or lifestyle interactions.

The newest release of the ScriptSave WellRx app, can help guide shoppers while they browse the aisles at the grocery store or as they take stock of their pantry. It’s a clear expansion outside of ScriptSave’s traditional domain. Moving beyond just pharmacy and prescription medications, the grocery guidance module can guide users towards more health-conscious food selections. It’s designed to help users concerned with chronic conditions like diabetes or heart health, and can help identify appropriate food selections for pregnant women.

These latest innovations to the app’s features are the result of more than two years of ongoing product development. Along the way, the team even managed to pick up a few awards for prototype versions of the app (including as a category winner at the 2017 National Association of Chain Drug Stores’ Product Showcase). ScriptSave’s Vice President of Product & Technology, Shawn Ohri, noted that the timing of this release to coincide with ScriptSave’s Silver Anniversary could hardly seem more fitting or rewarding to the team.

$10 Billion Saved

Meanwhile, an in-depth analysis of the traditional prescription savings programs that ScriptSave has been evolving throughout the course of its 25 years of innovation, shows how the business has helped an estimated 85 million patients in the US save a total of $10 billion on their prescription medication costs. In 2018 alone, the prescription discount program saved consumers $450 million on medications.

ScriptSave WellRx’s free savings cards and prescription coupons—which can be found online or in the mobile app—can help save patients up to 80% on their medications, with average savings of around 60%. In terms of dollars and cents, the average cash saved by patients using ScriptSave WellRx in 2018 was $30.85 per prescription.

Ohri noted that with the ever-increasing prices of medication in the US, ScriptSave WellRx is helping patients pay for the medications they need to not only get over a cold or fever but, in some cases, survive.

“This is our 25th anniversary, and during those years we’ve helped patients save $10 billion on prescriptions they need to get and stay healthy,” said Ohri. “Our prescription discount programs help consumers save money they can use on other critical expenses, like keeping the roof over their heads, putting food on the table for the family and buying school supplies for their kids. We continue to operate with a start-up mentality, bringing new and innovative solutions to help people manage their health and wellness.”

WellRx Mobile App Helps Consumers Find Lowest Prices at the Pharmacysrciptsave wellrx price drop alerts - image

At its core, ScriptSave WellRx negotiates drug prices in bulk with pharmacies across the nation, giving it access to pricing information for most prescription drugs being sold at independent and chain pharmacies. Consumers can access this data at no cost with the free ScriptSave WellRx mobile app and website.

This provides a fast, easy, free way for patients (and physicians) to get a second opinion on what an out-of-pocket cost might be. Patients can price-check all their family’s medications at most pharmacies in any zip code with just one click.

The price-check tool is available for free—no sign-up necessary—and features savings on medications at over 65,000 retail pharmacies across the U.S. In 2018, the program delivered average savings of 60%, with potential savings of 80% or more (relative to the cash price of those prescriptions being filled).

Patients can download the free ScriptSave WellRx mobile app (for iPhone and Android) or visit the website for more information.


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marijuana interactions with prescription drugs - scriptsave wellrx

With the growing legalization of marijuana, which has been approved for recreational use in 10 states and for medical use in 33 states1, there’s naturally a lot of buzz around the medical benefits. Emerging research suggests it may be a safer substitute for opioids to treat pain. But what about potential drug interactions?

Limited Research

But as research continues into possible benefits of using marijuana for treatment, questions remain about how cannabis might interact with prescribed or over-the-counter (OTC) medications a person may also be taking.

Some states have legalized the use of marijuana for medical purposes, as well as for recreation to varying degrees, however, the federal government has not. The tight federal restrictions create a challenge in researching how marijuana interacts with other products, either OTC or prescribed.

Prescription Savings - ScriptSave WellRx
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Interactions With Medications or Lifestyles

Some examples of medication types and common interactions include:

Drug Type Lifestyle Interaction
Tricyclic antidepressants May result in adverse cardiovascular effects, such as tachycardia and cardiac arrhythmias.
Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) Administering nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) concurrently with marijuana may limit some of marijuana’s pharmacologic activities.
Benzodiazepines Using marijuana with benzodiazepines may result in an exaggerated sedative effect.
Amphetamines Using marijuana and amphetamines together may cause adverse cardiovascular effects, such as tachycardia and cardiac arrhythmias.
Beta-blockers Concurrent use may result in decreased beta-blocker efficacy, significantly increased heart rate and cardiac output lasting for 2-3 hours, myocardial infarction and cardiac arrhythmias.

Visit www.wellrx.com for more information on drug and lifestyle interactions.

Synthetic Marijuana (Marinol)

In addition to tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD) is found in high concentrations in marijuana. CBD does not produce any of the psychoactive responses and appears to block some of the effects of THC by acting as an antagonist at the cannabinoid receptors. Cannabinol is weakly psychoactive and appears to be primarily formed from the metabolism of THC. Another metabolite of THC is thought to contribute to the tachycardia and appetite-stimulating effects of cannabis.2,3

An FDA-approved synthetic form of marijuana uses a chemical compound similar to those found in cannabis. Marinol (drobinol) is approved to help with nausea induced by chemotherapy as well as anorexia caused by AIDS.

The Takeaway

For most patients, cannabis:

  • Is relatively safe
  • Well-tolerated, and;
  • Carries fewer risks of adverse drug interactions than many commonly prescribed drugs.

Given its therapeutic versatility, one of the best arguments for cannabis is that it can actually reduce the need to combine multiple medications, therefore lowering the potential risk of adverse interactions.4

References:

  1. https://www.businessinsider.com/legal-marijuana-states-2018-1
  2. https://health.usnews.com/health-care/patient-advice/articles/2018-03-08/how-does-marijuana-interact-with-medications
  3. https://www.pharmacytimes.com/publications/issue/2014/december2014/drug-interactions-with-marijuana
  4. https://www.leafly.com/news/health/cannabis-cannabinoids-drug-interactions

If you’re struggling to afford your medications,
visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you.
You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!

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by Cindy Cho, PharmD Candidate Class of 2019,
The University of Arizona College of Pharmacy

In short, no. You cannot get pneumonia from the pneumonia vaccine. With all of the news coverage about vaccines, it is important to equip yourself with the knowledge on what vaccines are, how they work, and why they don’t cause disease, so you can make an informed decision on your health.

What is a vaccine?

A vaccine is a substance that contains very small amounts of weakened or dead germs to stimulate your body to produce immunity against certain diseases. Before the invention of vaccinations, the only way a person’s body can gain immunity to certain diseases is to (hopefully) survive an infection from the germ that causes the disease. For example, if a person gets pneumonia, an infection of the lung, from a certain germ and survives, their body will remember that specific germ if it were to come across it again. By remembering the germ, the body can protect itself and fight off the infection more efficiently to prevent sickness in the future. Vaccines provide a similar immune system response to help the body create immune system cells to remember disease-causing germs to protect your body, but the best part is that vaccines don’t come with the risks of getting the actual disease or its associated complications. Some vaccines can provide protection against multiple types of germs that cause the same disease to better protect against epidemics.1

What are pneumonia vaccines?

Now that you understand how vaccines work, let’s talk about the pneumonia vaccines! There are two pneumonia vaccines intended for use in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which includes the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13 or Prevnar 13) and the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23 or Pneumovax 23).2 Both of these pneumonia vaccines contain inactivated, or dead, germs. Because these vaccines contain dead germs, they cannot replicate in the body or cause disease.1 The differences between the two pneumonia vaccines are shown below:

  • Prevnar 13: this is a conjugated vaccine, which means it contains a protein that is joined to a part of dead bacteria to improve the protection the vaccine provides. Doctors give this vaccine to children at 2, 4, 6, and 12 through 15 months old. Young children need multiple doses of this vaccine to boost their protection since their immune system is not yet mature. Adults who need this vaccine only get a single dose. The vaccine has 13 in its name because it helps protect against 13 types of pneumococcal bacteria that most commonly causes serious infections in children and adults.2
  • Pneumovax 23:  this is a polysaccharide vaccine, which means it is made to look like the surface of certain bacteria in order to help the body build protection against that germ. Doctors give a single dose of this vaccine to people who need it. CDC recommends one or two additional doses for people with certain chronic medical conditions. The vaccine has 23 in its name because it helps protect against serious infections caused by 23 types of pneumococcal bacteria.2

 So, who needs the pneumonia vaccines?

Great question! Pneumonia disproportionately affects the young, the elderly, and the immunocompromised, so the CDC recommends these vulnerable patient populations to receive the pneumonia vaccines.3 The CDC created an immunization schedule that outlines when the two pneumonia vaccines should be received.

CDC recommends vaccination with the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13 or Prevnar 13®) for:2

  • All children younger than 2 years old
  • All adults 65 years or older
  • People 2 through 64 years old with certain medical conditions*

CDC recommends vaccination with the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23 or Pneumovax23®) for:2

  • All adults 65 years or older
  • People 2 through 64 years old with certain medical conditions*
  • Adults 19 through 64 years old who smoke cigarettes

*Certain medical conditions such as: chronic heart disease, lung disease, liver disease, diabetes, HIV, or certain cancers warrant some adults to receive the pneumonia vaccines before the age of 65.4

What are the side effects of the pneumonia vaccines?

Reactions to the pneumonia vaccine can occur, such as cold-like symptoms, but it is important to realize that those are adverse reactions to the vaccine and not pneumonia itself. Talk to your doctor if you have allergies to any ingredients in vaccines. Below are common adverse reactions to the pneumonia vaccines:

Mild side effects reported with Prevnar 13 can include:2

  • Reactions where the shot was given
    • Redness
    • Swelling
    • Pain or tenderness
  • Fever
  • Loss of appetite
  • Fussiness (irritability)
  • Feeling tired
  • Headache
  • Chills

Mild side effects reported with Pneumovax23 can include:2

  • Reactions where the shot was given
    • Redness
    • Pain
  • Fever
  • Muscle aches

Why are the pneumonia vaccines important?

Vaccines, like the pneumonia vaccines, can prevent or decrease the severity of diseases. Unfortunately, around 50,000 people die from pneumonia in the United States each year.3 It is passed along through airborne droplets, such as from a cough or sneeze, so it is a highly contagious infection.2 It is crucial to receive the pneumococcal vaccine to not only protect yourself but to protect your loved ones around you. Especially if you have a breathing condition like asthma or COPD, it is important to have the pneumonia vaccines to prevent respiratory infections that can potentially make your breathing worse. Talk to your provider or local pharmacy if you are due for your pneumonia vaccine today.

References:

  1. Principles of Vaccination. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/prinvac.html. Published September 8, 2015. Accessed February 14, 2019.
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/pneumo/public/index.html. Published December 6, 2017. Accessed February 14, 2019.
  3. Top 20 Pneumonia Facts (2018). American Thoracic Society.  https://www.thoracic.org/patients/patient-resources/resources/top-pneumonia-facts.pdf. Accessed February 14, 2019.
  4. Recommended Adult Immunization Schedule for ages 19 years or older, United States, 2019. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/hcp/imz/adult.html#note-pneumo. Published January 2019. Accessed February 14, 2019.

 


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ScriptSave WellRx app pill refill reminders - blog image

by Dan Johnson, RPh and PharmD,
Vice President of Network Strategy, ScriptSave

The risk for medication interactions dramatically increases as patients take multiple drugs. ScriptSave’s own Dr. Dan Johnson recently had an article published on the Living Better 50 website on steps you can take to protect yourself from dangerous drug interactions.

*****

More than 2 million patients are hospitalized every year after they inadvertently mix their prescription drugs, while another 100,000 die annually. And the statistics get worse with age. The chance of an adverse drug reaction for people over 50 jumps 33 percent versus younger people.

Even over-the-counter medications and supplements can incite dangerous health risks.For example, patients with high blood pressure should avoid taking cough medicines with decongestants and should consult their pharmacist on the best options to seek relief from cold and flu symptoms. Patients taking prescriptions for depression, chest pain, ADHD, gout, arthritis and other common ailments can frequently be at more risk for dangerous reactions if they don’t keep track of their prescription regimen.

How Can Patients Protect Themselves From Drug Interactions?

  1. Ideally, patients should go to the same pharmacist and discuss any other prescriptions they may be taking. This conversation should include over-the-counter and supplements – in addition to any medications.
  2. Be aware of how common household foods can impact medications. People who take Lipitor or Zocor with grapefruit juice may experience muscle pain and other side effects.
  3. As we age, our bodies metabolize drugs slower and at different rates. Because of this, patients should monitor any reactions to any new or existing drugs.
  4. There are many user friendly, free mobile apps that keep track of a patient’s regimen – alerting them to potential dangerous interactions. ScriptSave WellRx has a new “Virtual Medicine Cabinet” that warns patients of hazardous drug interactions. It also sends reminders when patients need to take their next pill, or need a refill.

Read the full story on living50better.com.

 

————–Addendum (13 Mar, 2019)————–

…and check out what Dr Max Gomez had to say on CBS News, including an interview with ScriptSave’s Dr Dan Johnson.

 

 


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by Katie Tam, PharmD Candidate,
University of Arizona College of Pharmacy

In October 2017, Acting Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Eric D. Hargan issued a statement declaring a nationwide public health emergency regarding the opioid crisis.1 The opioid epidemic in America has become a top priority in efforts to prevent opioid overuse.

Opioids are a drug class that includes heroin, oxycodone, hydrocodone, codeine, morphine, fentanyl, and many other prescription pain relievers. These medications can carry serious risks, like addiction, overdose, and even death.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) reported that more than 42,000 people died from overdoses involving opioids and estimated 40% of opioid overdose deaths involved a prescription opioid.2

New Medicare Part D Opioid Overutilization Policies

To help you use prescription opioid pain medications more safely, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has recently introduced new regulations in the Medicare part D prescription drug program. Using recommendations made by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on prescribing opioids for pain, CMS developed new safety measures. Here are some key points that are crucial to understand:

  1. New Opioid Users: Your Medicare drug plan and pharmacist will do safety reviews of your opioid pain medications when you fill a prescription. If you are a new opioid user, you may be limited to a 7 day supply or less. The hope is to reduce the risk of longer-term opioid misuse through closer management of opioid naïve patients.2 This policy will affect Medicare patients who have not filled an opioid prescription within the past 60 days and will prevent pharmacies from filling a new opioid prescription exceeding a 7 days supply.2
  2. Limited Opioid Amount: During the safety review, your pharmacist will also look for potentially unsafe opioid amounts and drug-drug interactions that may increase your risk of overdose. If your pharmacist decides that your total opioid prescription dose is not safe, the plan may limit your coverage of these drugs. This alert will identify patients that may benefit from closer monitoring and care coordination and encourage doctors to educate patients about opioid overdose risk and prevention.3
  3. High-Risk Opioid Users: This new regulation allows Medicare drug plans to implement a drug management program (DMP) that limits access to opioids and benzodiazepines (used for anxiety and sleep) for patients at high risk of opioid abuse.3 High risk patients will need to obtain their opioids from specified doctors or pharmacies. Before Medicare places you in a DMP, it will notify you by letter. The goal of this program is to identify potential at-risk patients and provide better care coordination for safer use of opioids and benzodiazepines.3

Opioid Policy Exclusions

The new opioid regulations do not apply to patients with cancer, those who get hospice, palliative, or end-of-life care, or who live in a long-term care facility. Also, patients who use the medication-assisted treatment (MAT) program will not be impacted by these new policy changes.2

About 115 patients die every day from an opioid overdose. Because opioid addiction is driving this epidemic, the hope is that these new regulations will reduce the negative impacts of the epidemic on Americans.4 If you suffer from severe or long-term pain, talk with your doctor about all your pain treatment options including whether taking an opioid is appropriate for you. There may be other ways to manage your pain with less risks.

Resources:

  1. HHS Acting Secretary Declares Public Health Emergency to Address National Opioid Crisis https://www.hhs.gov/about/news/2017/10/26/hhs-acting-secretary-declares-public-health-emergency-address-national-opioid-crisis.html
  2. A Prescriber’s Guide to the New Medicare Part D Opioid Overutilization Polices for 2019. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. https://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Prescription-Drug-Coverage/PrescriptionDrugCovContra/RxUtilization.html. Accessed January 20, 2019.
  3. CY 2019 Final Call letter. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. https://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Health-Plans/MedicareAdvtgSpecRateStats/Downloads/Announcement2019.pdf. Accessed January 20, 2019.
  4. Dowell D, Haegerich TM, Chou R. CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain — United States, 2016. MMWR Recomm Rep. 2016;65:1-49, available at http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.rr6501e1.

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alternatives toSudafed for HBP patients - allergy image - scriptsave wellrx

by Katie Tam
PharmD Candidate Class of 2019, University of Arizona

It’s allergy season and you can’t breathe the fresh air because your nose is congested and stuffed. You visit the pharmacy and purchase a box of Sudafed. Your pharmacist asks if you have a history of high blood pressure, and you answer “yes.” The pharmacist replies that she does not recommend Sudafed for you, but why?

What you need to know about Pseudoephedrine:

Brands of common over-the counter decongestants that contain pseudoephedrine: Allegra-D, Alka Seltzer Plus Cold Medicine Liqui-Gels, Aleve Cold and Sinus Caplets, Benadryl Allergy and Sinus Tablets, Claritin-D Non-Drowsy 24 Hour Tablets, Robitussin Cold Severe Congestion Capsules, Sudafed 24 Hour Tablets, SudoGest, Wal-phed 12 hour, Suphedrine.2

Indications: nasal congestion, sinus congestion, and Eustachian tube congestion

Adverse side effects of pseudoephedrine:

  • Common: insomnia, nervousness, excitability, dizziness, and anxiety
  • Infrequent: tachycardia (rapid heart beat) or palpitations
  • Rare: dilated pupils, hallucinations, arrythmias (irregular heartbeat), high blood pressure, seizures, inflammation of the large intestine, and severe skin reactions

Contraindications for pseudoephedrine:

  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Severe or uncontrolled high blood pressure
  • Severe coronary artery disease
  • Prostatic hypertrophy
  • Hyperthyroidism
  • Closed angle glaucoma
  • Pregnant women

Pseudoephedrine and High Blood Pressure Interaction

In 2005, a study showed that pseudoephedrine increased systolic blood pressure and heart rate, but had no effect on diastolic blood pressure.1 They also found that higher doses and immediate-release formulations of pseudoephedrine were associated with higher blood pressures.1 In addition, the study revealed that patients with well controlled hypertension had higher systolic and diastolic blood pressures after taking immediate release pseudoephedrine formulations.1

What are safe alternatives to pseudoephedrine in patients with high blood pressure?

There are a few safe and effective alternatives to pseudoephedrine in patients with high blood pressure that can relieve nasal or sinus congestion symptoms. Placing a humidifier in the bedroom keeps moisture in the air, which helps prevent your nasal passages from drying out. Humidifiers can also help break up mucus and soothe inflamed nasal passageways.3 In addition, propping your head up on 2 pillows may help the mucus flow out of your nose and relieve some congestion. Saline sprays are also another safe option that can loosen congestion and improve drainage.3 If a patient with high blood pressure insists on taking a medication that includes pseudoephedrine, their pharmacist or physician will recommend the patient to monitor their blood pressure and take a sustained-release formulation to reduce the risk of increasing blood pressure.3

Next time you have sinus or nasal congestion, ask your physician before using pseudoephedrine if you have high blood pressure. Your local pharmacist can also help manage nasal congestion symptoms, provide valuable information regarding safer alternatives, and ensure optimal drug selection in patients with high blood pressure.

Resources:

  1. Salerno SM, Jackson JL, Berbano EP. Effect of Oral Pseudoephedrine on Blood Pressure and Heart Rate: A Meta-analysis. Arch Intern Med. 2005;165(15):1686–1694. doi:10.1001/archinte.165.15.1686.
  2. Radack  KDeck  CC Are oral decongestants safe in hypertension? an evaluation of the evidence and a framework for assessing clinical trials.  Ann Allergy 1986;56396- 401.
  3. High Blood Pressure and Cold Remedies: Which Are Safe? Mayo Clinic.  https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-pressure/expert-answers/high-blood-pressure/faq-20058281. Published January 09, 2019. Accessed January 20, 2019.

 

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activated charcoal image - scriptsave wellrx blog

by Terra Leon, PharmD Candidate 2019

With all the new diet and detoxification trends arising from celebrities and the media, it’s hard to know harmful from helpful. Activated charcoal has been portrayed as the new “magic bullet” for multiple health issues. Activated charcoal’s popularity is quickly spreading and turning up in supplements, juices, hangover remedies, face masks and even toothpaste. The media and celebrities promise it will reduce bloating, clear skin, whiten your teeth, and detox your organs for a healthier life. But does it work?

What is Activated Charcoal

Charcoal is a fine black powder made from bone char, coal, saw dust, olive pits, coconut shells or petroleum coke4. The charcoal becomes activated when it is heated at a high enough temperature the structure changes and provides a higher surface area for substances to bind to4. Activated charcoal’s oldest use is in medical practice in the Emergency Room as a treatment to detox patients who over dose on certain medications. When a patient over doses on a medication like Tylenol or Aspirin, activated charcoal is utilized to help trap toxins and gases in the gut. Since activated charcoal is not absorbed by the body it carries the toxins bound to its surface area out of your body through feces like a big drug sponge. Due to its highly negatively charged surface, activated charcoal attracts positively charged molecules for excretion, like toxins and gases but it can also have an effect on other medication and lead to lower absorption4.

Alternative Options

An alternative to activated charcoal to reduce gas and bloating, is to stick to a whole food plant-based diet, avoid products with artificial sweeteners, avoid carbonated drinks, and beer, which can release carbon dioxide gas, Also, be sure to eat and drink slowly1. Taking your time eating and drinking can help you swallow less air and reduce gas. Consult your health care provider for other alternative over-the-counter options, such as Gas-X, if natural options still don’t provide relief.

For clear skin try over the counter or prescription products that help reduce oils and clear bacteria on the skin surface. Make sure you wash your face every day and avoid high in oil foods to reduce surface oil1. Consult your healthcare professional if blemishes continue to arise.

If its whiter teeth you seek, try over the counter whitening kits that have hydrogen peroxide. Rinse your mouth after consuming coffee, soda or teas. Activated charcoal lacks published studies on being beneficial for teeth whitening. In fact, the fine black charcoal powder can potentially become embedded into cracks or small holes in the teeth producing the opposite effect1. Consult your dentist for alternative whitening procedures.

Not So Harmless?

Using activated charcoal supplement as a detoxification method is not as harmless as some may think.  Activated charcoal does not have the ability to suck out toxic chemicals from your body, its effects are limited to the GI tract3. Furthermore, it does not discriminate against helpful chemicals in food you consume and can remove beneficial nutrients such as Vitamin C, B6, Thiamine, Biotin and Niacin from the body3. In line with this, there are also concerns that activated charcoal can make medications less effective. In short, to “detox” or cleanse the body make sure to drink plenty of water each day and eat a high in fiber diet to help naturally remove waste from the body.

Medication Interactions

Activated charcoal can reduce the absorption and interrupt the circulation of certain medications and should only be used under the supervision of a health care professional2. If you are taking any prescription medication consult your doctor before using charcoal as a supplement or any other oral ingestible form. Due to its possibility of decreasing absorption of other medication it is recommended to take activated charcoal at least 1 hour before or 2 hours after taking other drugs if approved by your doctor2.

Bottom Line

With all the new health fads and trends offering a one supplement solve all solution or “magic bullet” it is easy to get sucked into the excitement of this new trend. When it comes to activated charcoal there are no strong studies supporting these benefits and weaker studies are not supported by science. Always consult your doctor or health care professional to gain all the information you need about a new product to determine if this product will be helpful or harmful to your personal health.

References:

  1. Calderone, Julia. “Activated Charcoal Isn’t a Magic Health Bullet.” Product Reviews and Ratings – Consumer Reports, Apr. 2017, consumerreports.org/dietary-supplements/activated-charcoal-fad-not-a-magic-health-bullet/.
  2. Charcoal Oral, Facts & Comparisons, 2018, https://fco.factsandcomparisons.com/lco/action/search?q=activated%2Bcharcoal&t=name&va=activated%2Bchar.
  3. Gavura, Scott. “Activated Charcoal: The Latest Detox Fad in an Obsessive Food Culture.” Science-Based Medicine, 28 Jan. 2016, sciencebasedmedicine.org/activated-charcoal-the-latest-detox-fad-in-an-obsessive-food-culture/. https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/activated-charcoal-the-latest-detox-fad-in-an-obsessive-food-culture/
  4. Petre, Alina. “What Is Activated Charcoal Good For? Benefits and Uses.” Healthline, Healthline Media, June 2017, www.healthline.com/nutrition/activated-charcoal#section10.

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Tucson, AZ. January 23, 2019 – It’s a fact – prescription medications don’t work if patients don’t take them, or fail to take them correctly. Taking medications as prescribed by your physician can help improve the quality and length of your life. The latest release of the ScriptSave® WellRx app can help.

Importance of Taking Your Medications

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), nearly 50% of Americans have used at least one prescription within the last 30 days. If you fall into this half of the country, you’ve probably already had the discussion with your doctor & pharmacist about the importance of following instructions, with insights on why it matters. One recent study, for example, shows that patients who were compliant with taking their statin medications for at least two years had a 30% reduction in the risk of hospitalization for heart attacks.1

Even with all the benefits medications can have on a patient’s health, there is still an issue with adherence to medication therapy.

scriptsave wellrx medication reminders - app imageThe ScriptSave WellRx App

 

Not only does the new ScriptSave WellRx app release provide prescription price transparency, it also allows patients to set alerts for when they’re due to take their next pill, as well as when it’s time to order their next refill from the pharmacy. Meanwhile, built in functionality helps patients track side-effects that they might want to share with their doctor (using the ScriptSave WellRx Mood Log, which can be launched from the virtual Medicine Chest).

In addition, the newest enhancement for users of the WellRx platform also provides free access to some potentially life-saving functionality:

  • Drug Interaction Warnings: Patients can receive and share warnings when drugs in their personal in-app Medicine Chest might interact with each other.
  • Lifestyle Interaction Warnings: This includes warnings about potential drug interactions with certain foods patients eat, or activities they might engage in.
  • Expanded Drug Information: Patients can view detailed information, images, and videos for drugs within the Medicine Chest. Much of this information is available in English and Spanish.

The new release also caters to users who wish take advantage of the added security afforded by biometric login. Users can set up fingerprint password management for the app, making signing in quick, easy and secure.

About ScriptSave WellRx

ScriptSave WellRx, owned by parent company Medical Security Card Company, LLC (MSC) and a member of the MedImpact, Inc. family of companies, offers savings on prescription medicines at more than 62,000 local and chain pharmacies, nationwide. ScriptSave WellRx is an online resource that makes prescription medicines more affordable and easier to manage for people who are uninsured, underinsured, or insured with high deductible plans.

References:

  1. Lansberg, P., Lee, A., Lee, Z., Subramaniam, K. and Setia, S. (2018). Nonadherence to statins: individualized intervention strategies outside the pill box. Vascular Health and Risk Management, Volume 14, pp.91-102.

 

 

————–Addendum (13 Mar, 2019)————–

Check out what Dr Max Gomez had to say on CBS News, including an interview with ScriptSave’s Dr Dan Johnson.

 

 


 

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searching online for health information - scriptsave wellrx - blog image

When it comes to health information on the internet, many patients are no longer sure what to believe. Just as important, patients often don’t know how to apply what they have read. Healthcare providers have the opportunity to help patients navigate through the vast variety of online health information.

Take the Practice Trends Today quiz (here) from the American Pharmacists Association (APhA) to learn more about helping patients understand the results of their online healthcare searches.

Click Here to take the quiz.


Download the free WellRx app from the iOS app store or the Google Play Store,
and get registered to take advantage of our free medication adherence tools.

If you’re struggling to afford your prescription medications,
visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you.
You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!

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bleeding risk - scriptsave wellrx blog image

by Randall Flores, PharmD Candidate 2019
University of Arizona

Bleeding can manifest itself in a variety of different ways which, at times, may not be easy to recognize. Some bleeds are also more serious than others and may require emergency medical attention. Bleeding frequency may also vary depending on a variety of factors such as underlying bleeding disorders or the use of certain medications.5

Potential Signs of Different Types of Bleeding

Gastrointestinal Bleeds5 
  • Bloody or black, tar-like stool
  • Weakness
  • Paleness
  • Swollen or firm abdomen
  • Vomiting or coughing blood
  • Abdominal or stomach pain
Urinary Tract Bleeds5  
  • Bright red or brown-colored urine
  • Pink urination
  • Frequent urination
  • Pain while urinating
  • Lower-back pain
Nosebleeds5  
  • Prolonged headache
  • Confusion, lethargy, and/or slurred speech
  • Discomfort to bright light
  • Double vision
  • Enlarged pupils or different size pupils
  • Dizziness and/or stumbling
  • Stiff neck or back
  • Seizures
  • Irritability
  • Loss of appetite
  • Sudden or forceful vomiting not due to upset stomach
Throat Bleeds5  
  • Choking
  • Vomiting or coughing up blood
  • Swelling or discoloration in the neck
  • Change in tone of voice
Eye Bleeds5  
  • Swelling or pain within or around the eye
  • Reddening of the white part of the eye
  • Double or blurred vision
  • Change in vision

Monitoring Lab Results While Taking Anticoagulants

Anticoagulation therapy is vital to the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic diseases; however, close monitoring is very important to treat and prevent harmful adverse effects. Lab monitoring is an important part of anticoagulation therapy to determine if it is necessary to counterbalance the anticoagulant effect of the drug4. Each drug has its own recommendations on lab monitoring depending on how it works in the body and possible adverse effects.

Coumadin (warfarin) remains the most prescribed oral anticoagulant medication worldwide despite the higher risk for bleeding compared to alternative anticoagulants1. The use of warfarin entails frequent blood tests and patient education about food and drug interactions4. The laboratory test that are most frequently monitored are prothrombin time (PT) and international normalized ratio (INR). PT is a test used to measure the number of seconds it takes for a clot to form3. INR on the other hand, is a more standardized PT measure so that it may serve as a reference value on how to adjust the dose depending on the result3. Higher INRs represent thinner blood, while lower INRs represent thicker blood.  [ Read more on our blog post, Losing the War With Warfarin? ]

New oral anticoagulants (NOACs) now formally known as direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have a few advantages over the use of warfarin. DOACs include dabigatran (Pradaxa), rivaroxaban (Xarelto), and apixaban (Eliquis). One of the biggest advantages over warfarin is that DOACs typically do not require dose adjustments and routine monitoring4. There are however some recommendations of monitoring certain parameters in patients with specific circumstances and comorbidities. Kidney function is an important parameter to monitor because all DOACs are eliminated by the kidney and impairment is a risk factor for bleeding1.

Antidote Medications to Reverse the Effects of Anticoagulants?

There are several reversal agent options for warfarin, despite its challenging management. The reversal agents used for warfarin include phytonadione (vitamin K), fresh frozen plasma (FFP), and prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC)2. The availability of these agents makes warfarin a viable option for patients who are at increased risk of bleeding and enables it to still be recommended by guidelines2.

DOACs are becoming more popular due to safety and efficacy over other anticoagulants, however only one of these agents has an FDA-approved reversal agent. Praxbind (idarucizumab) received accelerated FDA approval due to its promising results in clinical trials as a reversal agent to dabigatran (Pradaxa)2.

Currently, there is one agent called andexanet alfa that in phase III clinical trials as a reversal agent to the remaining DOAC agents2. As the use of DOAC agents become more popular, the need for effective antidotes is demanded.

Whether a someone is on anticoagulant therapy or not, it is important for people to have a general understanding about bleeding risks and how to identify different types of bleeds. Patients on anticoagulant therapy should also have a general idea about the monitoring that their therapy entails, potential risks, and management of those risks. The more patients know, the lower their chance of hospitalization from bleeding.

References:

1 Conway, S. E., Hwang, A. Y., Ponte, C. D., & Gums, J. G. (2016). Laboratory and Clinical Monitoring of Direct Acting Oral Anticoagulants: What Clinicians Need to Know. Pharmacotherapy, 37(2), 236-248. doi:https://doi.org/10.1002/phar.1884

2 Griffiths, C., Vestal, M., Livengood, S. and Hicks, S. (2017). Reversal agents for oral anticoagulants. [online] The Nurse Practitioner. Available at: https://journals.lww.com/tnpj/fulltext/2017/11000/Reversal_agents_for_oral_anticoagulants.2.aspx [Accessed 21 Sep. 2018].

3 Hull , R., Garcia, D., Vazquez, S. (2018). Warfarin (Coumadin) Beyond the Basics. UpToDate. Retrieved from https://www.uptodate.com/contents/warfarin-coumadin-beyond-the-basics

4 Ramos-Esquivel, A. (2015). Monitoring anticoagulant therapy with new oral agents. World Journal of Methodology5(4), 212–215. http://doi.org/10.5662/wjm.v5.i4.212

5 The Basics of Bleeding Disorders. (2018). National Hemophilia Foundation. Retrieved September 19, 2018, from https://stepsforliving.hemophilia.org/basics-of-bleeding-disorders/identifying-types-of-bleeds


If you’re struggling to afford your medications,
visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you.
You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!

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morning sickness - scriptsave wellrx blog image

By Pawel F. Kojs, PharmD Candidate Class of 2019,
University of Arizona College of Pharmacy

Morning sickness or nausea and vomiting in pregnancy (NVP) occurs in 70-80% of pregnant women.  In the United States, roughly 4 million women are affected each year.  This is more common in women that live in Western countries.1 A small percentage of women are affected each year with the more extreme form of morning sickness called hyperemesis gravidarum (HG).1

To help with this condition, there are many remedies to consider with your provider.

How can diet help with morning sickness?

With respect to diet, it is best to avoid large meals and eat smaller meals more often throughout the day.  Eating more protein and less fat is advised as well.2

Even though it’s difficult, eating foods that do not have a high flavor profile and ones that are low in fat helps reduce the time it takes for food to leave the stomach.  This in turn helps with reducing the amount of symptoms one would have with morning sickness.2

Which options can help me with morning Sickness?

There are different options to help treat morning sickness. Avoid smells, foods, tastes, and smells that trigger that nauseous feeling. Talk to your healthcare provider before taking any new prescription or over-the-counter (OTC) medications, and nutritional/herbal supplements.

Prescription Options

Disclaimer: Always consult with your provider before taking any medication during pregnancy.

OTC Options

These options for pregnancy related nausea and vomiting are commonly used. The types of medications are available at your neighborhood pharmacy, but it is recommended to monitor for drowsiness or sedation.

Disclaimer: Always consult with your provider before taking any medication during pregnancy.

Prenatal Supplements

It is advisable to talk to a doctor regarding getting a proper prenatal supplementation. You and your provider can discuss how much folic acid you should take. US Department of Health & Human Services Office of Women’s Health (DHHS) recommends taking at least 400 – 800 micrograms of folic acid daily, starting at least three months before conception.3 Prenatal supplements should be taken on an empty stomach. If you experience stomach upset, try taking it before bed with a light snack.

References:


If you’re struggling to afford your medications,
visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you.
You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!

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medications can increase your fall risk - scriptsave wellrx blog image

by Roxanna Orsini
PharmD Candidate Class of 2019, University of Arizona

Falls Happen More Often Than You Think

Every year there are millions of falls occurring in the older population, aged 65 and older.2 About 1 out of 4 older people fall each year, with less than half reporting it to their doctor.2 Your chances of a recurrent fall doubles after your first fall. The emergency department (ED) treats about 3 million older individuals for fall injuries each year.2 The most common injuries seen in the ED after a fall includes fractures, superficial injuries, and head injuries.(2,3) Patients have reported a reduction in their quality of life up to 9 months after being admitted in the ED for a fall.3

After a fall you may develop a fear of falling. This can cause negative health effects including:3

  • Recurrent falls
  • Reduced physical activity
  • Restriction or avoidance of social activities
  • Depression/anxiety

Are You at Risk for a Fall?

Here are a few questions to help you determine if you are at risk of a fall:5

  • Do you rush to use the bathroom?
  • Do you take a medication to help you sleep or improve your mood?
  • Do you take a medication that sometimes makes you feel light-headed or more tired than usual?
  • Do you use or have been advised to use a cane or walker?
  • Have you lost some feeling in your feet?
  • Do you feel unsteady when walking at times?
  • Have you had a previous fall?

Answering yes to any of these questions should warrant a conversation with your doctor about getting screened for your risk of falling.

There are certain chronic medical conditions that can contribute to your chances of a fall such as arthritis, dementia, stroke, cataracts, Parkinson’s disease, and urinary incontinence.1 Some of the medications used for these health conditions can increase your risk of a fall. However, falls can be caused by almost any medication that effects your brain or blood circulation.

Some Medications Can Increase the Risk of a Fall

A few medications that can increase your risk of a fall include:3

Most of these medications can decrease your alertness, cause fatigue, dizziness, and drop your blood pressure when you stand up (also referred to as postural hypotension).1

Postural hypotension occurs in about 30% of older adults and may experience one of these symptoms within 1 minute to several minutes of standing up:4

  • Lightheadedness
  • Blurred vision
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Weakness

If you are taking any of these medications, experiencing any of these symptoms or taking more than 6 medications, talk to your doctor about your risk for a fall.4 Your doctor may need to reduce or change your medication to help reduce your symptoms and fall risk, never make any changes to your medication without consulting your doctor first.

Balance, medications, and home safety should be addressed in everyone at high risk.4 To help maintain the highest level of mobility and reduce your chances of falling or risk of injury, follow up with your doctor. Your doctor can provide tips and recommend exercises designed to prevent falls and help avoid unnecessary trips to the Emergency Department.

 

References:

  1. Berg, R. and Cassells, J. (1992). Falls in Older Persons: Risk Factors and Prevention. [online] Ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK235613/ [Accessed 18 Jul. 2018].
  2. gov. (2018). Important Facts about Falls | Home and Recreational Safety | CDC Injury Center. [online] Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/homeandrecreationalsafety/falls/adultfalls.html [Accessed 20 Jul. 2018].
  3. de Jong, M., Van der Elst, M. and Hartholt, K. (2013). Drug-related falls in older patients: implicated drugs, consequences, and possible prevention strategies. Therapeutic Advances in Drug Safety, 4(4), pp.147-154.
  4. Phelan, E., Mahoney, J., Voit, J. and Stevens, J. (2015). Assessment and Management of Fall Risk in Primary Care Settings. Medical Clinics of North America, 99(2), pp.281-293.
  5. Sri‐on, J., Tirrell, G., Kamsom, A., Marill, K., Shankar, K. and Liu, S. (2018). A High‐yield Fall Risk and Adverse Events Screening Questions From the Stopping Elderly Accidents, Death, and Injuries (STEADI) Guideline for Older Emergency Department Fall Patients. Academic Emergency Medicine.

Download the free WellRx app from the iOS app store or the Google Play Store,
and get registered to take advantage of our free medication adherence tools.

If you’re struggling to afford your prescription medications,
visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you.
You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!

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