humalog blog image - scriptsave wellrx

by Ryan Lowe, PharmD Candidate,
The University of Arizona College of Pharmacy

For many patients with diabetes, insulin has become a mainstay of their therapy. Despite the addition of newer drugs on the market (like the exciting GLP-1 agonists such as Victoza (liraglutide), insulin remains a popular choice among physicians for its numerous benefits. The dose of insulin can be easily adjusted; if your blood sugars are running high then simply try taking two more units and reevaluate in a couple of days. Insulin is also a great drug when used in combination with other medications such as metformin; these combinations allow for greater control of a patient’s diabetes. According to a study from the CDC, the percent of patients taking both insulin and an oral medication increased between 1997 and 2011. This suggests the importance of both types of medication in diabetes management. 1

What are the different types of Insulin available?

Insulin can be divided up into two categories: long acting and short acting. Most patients start out with a long acting insulin before a short acting insulin is added. The most common long acting insulin is Insulin Glargine, or Lantus. Another long acting insulin you may see is Insulin Detemir, or Levemir. These insulins are normally dosed once a day, and they work to keep your fasting sugars (your blood sugar when you’re not eating any food) within normal limits.  The most common side effect of long acting insulin is hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. When you take too much insulin your body eats up too much glucose, resulting in low blood sugar levels. If you are hypoglycemic then you may start shaking, feeling dizzy or faint, and feel confused or anxious. The quickest remedy for this is eating a high sugar snack or drink, such as a glass of orange juice. As noted earlier, one of the main benefits of long acting insulin is being able to adjust the dose more frequently to find the perfect dose for you. With a tablet medication it is harder to find the perfect middle ground; you either take one tablet or you take two. Insulin doesn’t work that way; since insulin is a liquid injection you can easily take a little more or a little less than you were previously to account for your blood sugar levels.

Short acting insulin works much quicker than the long acting insulins, hence the name. There are two common short acting insulins: Insulin Lispro, or Humalog and Insulin Aspart, or Novolog. These insulins are commonly taken after a meal. The idea behind this is that the insulin will counteract a large spike in blood sugar gained by eating a large meal. However, these insulins are rarely taken alone; rather they are normally used in combination with long acting insulin to combat both types of sugars: fasting and post-prandial, or post-eating sugars. Hypoglycemia is still a risk with these short acting insulins, but it isn’t as great a risk as with the long acting insulins. One consideration that has been on many patient’s mind, however, is the rising cost of insulin – and Humalog specifically has been in the news lately.

Why is Humalog making headlines?

Humalog is a short acting insulin manufactured by Eli Lilly, a drug company responsible for numerous popular medications. Eli Lilly released some pricing information about Humalog, and the numbers are raising some eyebrows among patients, healthcare providers, and even politicians. An insured patient will typically pay around $135 a month for Humalog (which is a decrease of 8.1% from 2014). When you don’t factor in the rebates typically covered by an insurance company, the monthly price of Humalog rises to $549.2 These differences have gotten a lot of people talking. Eli Lilly hopes that the information they released will help shed some light on the often-muddled issue of rising drug costs. Politicians on both sides seem to agree that drug costs need to come down in America, but the solution to this issue is not an easy one. Eli Lilly themselves hope to improve the situation by releasing a “half-price” Humalog under the generic name Insulin Lispro. The cost will be $137.35 per vial, which should significantly improve the annual cost for those uninsured patients with diabetes.3

In response to the Eli Lilly price drop for Humalog, Sanofi recently announced a program that they hope will make a difference in the cost of insulin.4 They unveiled a Netflix-like program that takes that model directly to patients, supplying insulin products for a flat monthly rate instead of the usual cost per prescription or refill. The drugmaker will use its Insulin Valyou Savings Program to deliver insulin products for $99 per month. For that monthly fixed price, Sanofi will offer up to 10 boxes of insulin pens and 10 mL vials per month, regardless of a patient’s income. The new $99-per-month price could be as little as one-tenth of the amount patients would have paid previously.

References:

  1. “Age-Adjusted Percentage of Adults with Diabetes Using Diabetes Medication, by Type of Medication, United States, 1997–2011.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 20 Nov. 2012, www.cdc.gov/diabetes/statistics/meduse/fig2.htm.
  2. Lovelace Jr., Berkeley. “Eli Lilly Sheds Light on Confidential Pricing, Discloses Charges for Popular Diabetes Drug Humalog.” CNBC, CNBC, 25 Mar. 2019, cnbc.com/2019/03/25/eli-lilly-discloses-pricing-data-for-its-popular-insulin-humalog.html.
  3. “Lilly to Launch a Half-Price Version of Insulin.” CNBC, CNBC, 4 Mar. 2019, www.cnbc.com/2019/03/04/lilly-to-launch-a-half-price-version-of-insulin.html.
  4. “Sanofi provides unprecedented access to its insulins for one set monthly price” Sanofi, 10 Apr. 2019   http://www.news.sanofi.us/2019-04-10-Sanofi-provides-unprecedented-access-to-its-insulins-for-one-set-monthly-price 

0 views

pneumonia vaccine image - scriptsave wellrx blog

by Cindy Cho, PharmD Candidate Class of 2019,
The University of Arizona College of Pharmacy

In short, no. You cannot get pneumonia from the pneumonia vaccine. With all of the news coverage about vaccines, it is important to equip yourself with the knowledge on what vaccines are, how they work, and why they don’t cause disease, so you can make an informed decision on your health.

What is a vaccine?

A vaccine is a substance that contains very small amounts of weakened or dead germs to stimulate your body to produce immunity against certain diseases. Before the invention of vaccinations, the only way a person’s body can gain immunity to certain diseases is to (hopefully) survive an infection from the germ that causes the disease. For example, if a person gets pneumonia, an infection of the lung, from a certain germ and survives, their body will remember that specific germ if it were to come across it again. By remembering the germ, the body can protect itself and fight off the infection more efficiently to prevent sickness in the future. Vaccines provide a similar immune system response to help the body create immune system cells to remember disease-causing germs to protect your body, but the best part is that vaccines don’t come with the risks of getting the actual disease or its associated complications. Some vaccines can provide protection against multiple types of germs that cause the same disease to better protect against epidemics.1

What are pneumonia vaccines?

Now that you understand how vaccines work, let’s talk about the pneumonia vaccines! There are two pneumonia vaccines intended for use in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which includes the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13 or Prevnar 13) and the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23 or Pneumovax 23).2 Both of these pneumonia vaccines contain inactivated, or dead, germs. Because these vaccines contain dead germs, they cannot replicate in the body or cause disease.1 The differences between the two pneumonia vaccines are shown below:

  • Prevnar 13: this is a conjugated vaccine, which means it contains a protein that is joined to a part of dead bacteria to improve the protection the vaccine provides. Doctors give this vaccine to children at 2, 4, 6, and 12 through 15 months old. Young children need multiple doses of this vaccine to boost their protection since their immune system is not yet mature. Adults who need this vaccine only get a single dose. The vaccine has 13 in its name because it helps protect against 13 types of pneumococcal bacteria that most commonly causes serious infections in children and adults.2
  • Pneumovax 23:  this is a polysaccharide vaccine, which means it is made to look like the surface of certain bacteria in order to help the body build protection against that germ. Doctors give a single dose of this vaccine to people who need it. CDC recommends one or two additional doses for people with certain chronic medical conditions. The vaccine has 23 in its name because it helps protect against serious infections caused by 23 types of pneumococcal bacteria.2

 So, who needs the pneumonia vaccines?

Great question! Pneumonia disproportionately affects the young, the elderly, and the immunocompromised, so the CDC recommends these vulnerable patient populations to receive the pneumonia vaccines.3 The CDC created an immunization schedule that outlines when the two pneumonia vaccines should be received.

CDC recommends vaccination with the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13 or Prevnar 13®) for:2

  • All children younger than 2 years old
  • All adults 65 years or older
  • People 2 through 64 years old with certain medical conditions*

CDC recommends vaccination with the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23 or Pneumovax23®) for:2

  • All adults 65 years or older
  • People 2 through 64 years old with certain medical conditions*
  • Adults 19 through 64 years old who smoke cigarettes

*Certain medical conditions such as: chronic heart disease, lung disease, liver disease, diabetes, HIV, or certain cancers warrant some adults to receive the pneumonia vaccines before the age of 65.4

What are the side effects of the pneumonia vaccines?

Reactions to the pneumonia vaccine can occur, such as cold-like symptoms, but it is important to realize that those are adverse reactions to the vaccine and not pneumonia itself. Talk to your doctor if you have allergies to any ingredients in vaccines. Below are common adverse reactions to the pneumonia vaccines:

Mild side effects reported with Prevnar 13 can include:2

  • Reactions where the shot was given
    • Redness
    • Swelling
    • Pain or tenderness
  • Fever
  • Loss of appetite
  • Fussiness (irritability)
  • Feeling tired
  • Headache
  • Chills

Mild side effects reported with Pneumovax23 can include:2

  • Reactions where the shot was given
    • Redness
    • Pain
  • Fever
  • Muscle aches

Why are the pneumonia vaccines important?

Vaccines, like the pneumonia vaccines, can prevent or decrease the severity of diseases. Unfortunately, around 50,000 people die from pneumonia in the United States each year.3 It is passed along through airborne droplets, such as from a cough or sneeze, so it is a highly contagious infection.2 It is crucial to receive the pneumococcal vaccine to not only protect yourself but to protect your loved ones around you. Especially if you have a breathing condition like asthma or COPD, it is important to have the pneumonia vaccines to prevent respiratory infections that can potentially make your breathing worse. Talk to your provider or local pharmacy if you are due for your pneumonia vaccine today.

References:

  1. Principles of Vaccination. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/prinvac.html. Published September 8, 2015. Accessed February 14, 2019.
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/pneumo/public/index.html. Published December 6, 2017. Accessed February 14, 2019.
  3. Top 20 Pneumonia Facts (2018). American Thoracic Society.  https://www.thoracic.org/patients/patient-resources/resources/top-pneumonia-facts.pdf. Accessed February 14, 2019.
  4. Recommended Adult Immunization Schedule for ages 19 years or older, United States, 2019. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/hcp/imz/adult.html#note-pneumo. Published January 2019. Accessed February 14, 2019.

 


Human score    Trustpilot Stars    number of reviews    Trustpilot Logo

Visit www.WellRx.com to find the
lowest medication prices
at pharmacies near you!
0 views

searching online for health information - scriptsave wellrx - blog image

When it comes to health information on the internet, many patients are no longer sure what to believe. Just as important, patients often don’t know how to apply what they have read. Healthcare providers have the opportunity to help patients navigate through the vast variety of online health information.

Take the Practice Trends Today quiz (here) from the American Pharmacists Association (APhA) to learn more about helping patients understand the results of their online healthcare searches.

Click Here to take the quiz.


Download the free WellRx app from the iOS app store or the Google Play Store,
and get registered to take advantage of our free medication adherence tools.

If you’re struggling to afford your prescription medications,
visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you.
You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!

0 views

best-statin-prices - scriptsave wellrx - blog image

by Jenny Bingham, PharmD, BCACP; Heather Lee, PharmD Candidate; Mitchell Welton, PharmD Candidate

In such a competitive cholesterol medication market, manufacturers have been forced to make drastic cuts to their medication costs. Amgen lowered its product by 60%, followed by a 45-70% reduction from Regeneron. The price reductions occurred in response to the national consumer’s options to trial a multitude of more affordable options for cholesterol management, based on their clinical goals.

To better understand each product, a comparison should be made between each medication’s indication, effectiveness, and price.

Praluent

Praluent is an adjunct for patients who have uncontrolled cholesterol levels despite the presence of high intensity statin therapy.1 It is indicated for patients with atherosclerosic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) who would benefit from an additional reduction of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Praluent has been reported to reduce cholesterol levels by >=40% of patients who taking a maximally tolerated dose of statin.2 It was also reported to be effective at reducing cardiovascular outcomes and all-cause death by 15% in patients who have acute coronary syndrome.3 The primary patient population that would obtain the most benefit from Praluent are patients who have high LDL cholesterol levels.3 A recent price reduction by Regeneron and Sanofi occurred in May 2018. The price decreased from $14,600/year to a range of $4,500 to $8,000/year via rebate.4

Repatha

Repatha is indicated for the treatment of hyperlipidemia and has been reported to reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke.6 Evidence demonstrates the potential for plaque reduction if used with statin therapy. Amgen recently followed suit with lowering the price of Repatha after competitors Regeneron and Sanofi lowered the price of their competing product as mentioned above. Prior to the lowered cost in October the annual price of Repatha was $14,100/year. Amgen initially offered a prescription savings card for eligible patients, however patients with federal, state, or government-funded healthcare insurance were excluded. The new cost is $5,850/year, a nearly 60% decrease in cost. Amgen recently announced new opportunities for Medicare patients to benefit from therapy as the result of the price cut. 7

What to Ask Your Provider and/or Pharmacist

With the new, more affordable prices, you might be curious if these medications are best for your cholesterol management and cardiovascular health. It’s important to maintain routine appointments with your provider to ensure your cholesterol levels are monitored appropriately. Based upon your lab results and medication history, your provider and/or pharmacist may deem it appropriate to trial one of the above noted medications. However, it’s also important to adhere to provider recommendations about lifestyle changes, like diet and exercise.

References:

  1. Accessdata.fda.gov: https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2015/125559Orig1s000lbledt.pdf. Published 2018. (accessed 29 Nov 2018)
  2. Alirocumab (Praluent) to Lower LDL-Cholesterol. JAMA. 2015;314(12):1284. doi:10.1001/jama.2015.11372
  3. American College of Cardiology: https://www.acc.org/latest-in-cardiology/articles/2018/03/05/15/53/sat-9am-odyssey-outcomes-cv-outcomes-with-alirocumab-after-acs-acc-2018 (accessed 29 Nov 2018)
  4. CNBC. https://www.cnbc.com/2018/05/01/regeneron-sanofi-chop-cholesterol-drug-price-in-express-scripts-pact.html. Published 2018. (accessed 29 Nov 2018)
  5. Repatha (Evolocumab Injection, for Subcutaneous Injection): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses. (n.d.): https://www.rxlist.com/repatha-drug.htm#indications.
  6. CBS News: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/drug-repatha-with-a-statin-could-help-reverse-heart-disease/ (accessed 4 Dec 2018)
  7. CNBC: https://www.cnbc.com/2018/10/24/amgen-cuts-price-of-cholesterol-drug-by-almost-60percent.html (accessed 4 Dec 2018).

For the best Rx price on
Crestor (rosuvastatin), Zocor (simvastatin), Lipitor (atorvastatin) and other statins,
visit www.WellRx.com.

Compare prices at more than
62,000 pharmacies nationwide.

0 views

2019 drug formulary changes - scriptsave wellrx - blog image

In the world of prescription drug insurance, there are medications that are covered by a health plan and some medications that are not covered. The list of drugs that are covered is known as the Prescription Drug Formulary (or “Formulary” for short).

What is a Prescription Drug Formulary?

If you’ve ever visited a pharmacy with a prescription in one hand and your insurance card in the other, only to be told that your medication is not covered by your insurance … but if your doctor is willing to change the prescription to a similar drug used to treat the same condition … you have first-hand experience of a Prescription Drug Formulary.

The formulary is a list of approved medications for which an insurer has agreed to help cover the cost. However, there might be multiple manufacturers of numerous drugs designed to treat the same condition. This is an opportunity for the insurance company to trim costs by only agreeing to cover one drug for each health condition.

For pharmaceutical manufacturers, this can be a very big deal to be included or excluded from an insurer’s formulary list. Accordingly, each health plan generally reviews its coverage list on an annual basis. This helps ensure they continue to get the best possible price-points for the competing medications that are available to treat high-cost health conditions.

For patients, this can mean that, each year, they may discover the drug they had been taking is no longer covered. This may require them to switch to an alternative medication to continue receiving help paying for the medication from their insurance provider.

Prescription Formulary Changes for 2019

At the time of this write-up, the calendar is fast approaching year-end, and new insurance plan-years for 2019. Many formulary lists are likely to change. Two of the largest managers of prescription drug formularies in the U.S. are Express Scripts and CVS Caremark. Here are the details of the medications these two companies are REMOVING from their lists for 2019:

Acanya  Humatrope  Saizen 
Acticlate  Invokamet XR  Savaysa 
Alcortin A  Invokamet  Sorilux 
Alocril  Invokana  Sovaldi 
Alomide  Jentadueto XR  Synerderm 
Alprolix  Jentadueto  Targadox 
Altoprev  Lazanda  Tirosint 
Atripla  Levicyn  Topicort spray 
Avenova  Levorphanol  Tradjenta 
Benzaclin  Lupron Depot-Ped  Uroxatral 
Berinert  Mavyret  Vagifem 
Brisdelle  Maxidex  Vanatol LQ 
Brovana  Nalfon  Vanatol S 
Cambia  Namenda XR  Veltin 
Chorionic Gonadotropin Neupro patch  Verdeso foam 
Climara Pro  Norco  Viagra 
Contrave ER  Norditropin  Vivelle-Dot 
Cortifoam  Nutropin AQ Nuspin  Xadago 
Daklinza  Nuvigil  Xerese cream 
Duzallo  Olysio  Xyntha Solofuse 
Eloctate Omnitrope  Xyntha 
Emadine  Onexton  Yasmin 
Embeda  Oxycodone ER  Zemaira 
Extavia  Pradaxa  Ziana 
Fasenra  Praluent  Zolpimist 
Fenoprofen (capsule) Pred Mild  Zomacton 
Fenortho  Pregnyl  Zonegran 
Flarex  Prolastin-C  Zuplenz 
FML Forte  Qsymia  Zurampic 
FML S.O.P.  Recombinate  Zypitamag

If your medications are listed above (and if your insurer uses Express Scripts or CVS Caremark to manage their formulary) you can speak to your doctor or pharmacist about alternative medications designed to treat the same health condition. You can check these alternatives against your insurer’s new formulary list for 2019.

What If My Drugs Are Excluded?

It may also be worth double-checking the cash-price (i.e., the price without insurance) for your current medication. You can do this by clicking the drug name link in the list above. This can be a worthwhile effort, as the cash-price can often be lower than an insurance copay [Read more about Always Ask Cash Price]

What If I Can’t Switch to a Covered Alternative Drug?

If you’re unable to switch medications, you may be able to get some help from the FREE ScriptSave WellRx program. We negotiate savings on the cash-prices of medications at over 65,000 retail pharmacies across the United States. Patients can save up to 80% (relative to the cash price of their prescription).

Our price-check tool is available for free — no sign-up necessary. Go to www.wellrx.com or download the ScriptSave WellRx mobile app on iOS and Android to see how much you’ll save on your prescription costs!


Read public reviews of the ScriptSave WellRx program on Trustpilot. Today we are ranked:
Human score    Trustpilot Stars    number of reviews    Trustpilot Logo

pharmacy gag clause quiz - scriptsave wellrx - blog image

For years, contractual clauses have kept pharmacy employees from telling their customers when a better price was available than their insurance copay for prescription medications. Recent congressional legislation has made changes to how that works.

So, how much do you know about how the Know the Lowest Price Act of 2018 and Patient Right to Know Drug Prices Act? Learn more about the impacts to the pharmacy customer by taking the Practice Trends quiz at pharmacist.com.

For more in-depth information on the latest changes to the ‘Gag Clause’ laws, check out our latest blog post, Outlawing Pharmacy Gag Clauses.

 


For the best Rx price on
prescription medications,
visit www.WellRx.com.
Compare prices at more than
62,000 pharmacies nationwide.

 

Read public reviews of the ScriptSave WellRx program on Trustpilot. Today we are ranked:

Human score    Trustpilot Stars    number of reviews    Trustpilot Logo

0 views

Pharmacy Gag Clause - pharmacist perspective - ScriptSave WellRx blog image

by Mitchell Welton, PharmD Candidate 2019
University of Arizona

After the much anticipated release of the 2016 Gallup poll, which had Americans assign a rating of honesty and ethical standards in professions, Pharmacists found themselves in a top-three ranking for the 14th straight year.1 In last year’s poll however, it seems the general public’s opinion of pharmacists had shifted slightly. With increased news coverage and scrutiny over rising drug prices, it seemed harder for patients to be able to separate the practices of big pharmaceutical companies with the copay price that the pharmacists were asking for at the drug counter.

Pharmacy Gag Clauses

Although the community pharmacist was unable to control the inflating cost from the manufacturers, there was a more insidious practice taking place that kept their hands tied and mouths shut, even though patients might have been paying more for their prescription medications than they needed to. This was due to pharmacy gag clauses, written into the contracts between the pharmacy and pharmacy benefit managers (PBM). These clauses prevented a pharmacist from telling the patient at the point of sale if the cash price was lower than their insurance copay. To violate such a gag order would mean risking the pharmacy’s network contracts with its PBMs and facing other sanctions.2

An example of this practice will help explain why the opinion of pharmacy ethics and honesty were not found in the top-three ranking in last year’s poll: A patient’s spouse went to pick up her generic medication, telmisartan, from their local pharmacy. He paid $285 for a 90-day supply. Before the 90-day period he and his wife decided to go on a trip and would run out of her previous fill before returning home. He went to go purchase another 90-day refill out of pocket and found out the cash price was $40. While a spokesperson for the PBM involved in this event confirmed that the $285 copay was correct he was unable explain why that dollar amount was so much higher than the cash price of the medication.3 Overpayments like this, known as “clawbacks”, have unfortunately not been isolated events, and the occurrence was recently quantified by the University of Southern California’s Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics.

[ Read more about PBM Pharmacy Clawback’s ]

The study which was completed in March of this year looked at available pharmacy claim data from 2013. The study analyzed over nine million claims in which they found close to a quarter of them to involve overpayment. The average amount patients overpaid was $7.69 and overpayments on a brand name medication were significantly higher although not as frequent. 4

States Take the Lead

Between 2016 and August 2018 at least 26 states have enacted laws prohibiting “gag clauses” in pharmacy contracts. The most recent action came from the White House on October 10, 2018, when President Donald Trump signed into law the “Know the Lowest Price Act” and the “Patient’s Right to Know Drug Prices Act” which banned gag clauses immediately upon signature. This has represented a major victory for pharmacists who have had to remain silent while they watched the patients they care about struggle to pay for their medications. 2

How Pharmacists Feel About Gag Clauses

Pharmacists and law makers alike are disturbed that such practices have been allowed to exist. Senator Susan Collins, Republican of Maine, said, “I can’t tell you how frustrated these pharmacists were that they were unable to give that information to their customers, who they knew were struggling to pay a high co-pay.” Senator Martin M. Looney, Democrat of Connecticut said, “This is information that consumers should have, but that they were denied under the somewhat arbitrary and capricious contracts that pharmacists were required to abide by.” 5 Pharmacist Robert Iacobucci Jr., who owns White Cross Pharmacy in North Providence, Rhode Island expressed his frustration,” There’s no other profession in the world where you can’t tell your customer how to best utilize their money.”  When you see a 98-2 vote from the senate in such a divisive political climate to eliminate these gag clauses, it is telling that change was long overdue.

For more than a decade pharmacists have consistently been thought of as the pinnacle of honesty and ethical behavior when evaluating professions. The recent ban on these gag clauses will allow pharmacists to maintain that respected title and get back to what they do best; Improving the health and outcomes of their patients.

 

References

  1. Gallup, Inc, and Jim Norman. “Americans Rate Healthcare Providers High on Honesty, Ethics.” com, 19 Dec. 2016, news.gallup.com/poll/200057/americans-rate-healthcare-providers-high-honesty-ethics.aspx.
  2. Snyder, Lynn S, and John S Linehan. “New Federal Laws Banning ‘Gag Clauses’ in the Pharmacy.” The National Law Review, 30 Oct. 2018, natlawreview.com/article/new-federal-laws-banning-gag-clauses-pharmacy.
  3. Thompson, Megan. “Why a Patient Paid a $285 Copay for a $40 Drug.” PBS, Public Broadcasting Service, 19 Aug. 2018, pbs.org/newshour/health/why-a-patient-paid-a-285-copay-for-a-40-drug.
  4. Van Nuys, Karen, et al. Overpaying for Prescription Drugs: The Copay Clawback Phenomenon. USC Schaeffer, Mar. 2018, http://healthpolicy.usc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/2018.03_Overpaying20for20Prescription20Drugs_White20Paper_v.1-2.pdf.
  5. Pear, Robert. “Why Your Pharmacist Can’t Tell You That $20 Prescription Could Cost Only $8.” The New York Times, The New York Times, 24 Feb. 2018, nytimes.com/2018/02/24/us/politics/pharmacy-benefit-managers-gag-clauses.html.
  6. Povich, Elaine S., and Tribune News Service. “The ‘Gag Clause’.” The Lewiston Tribune, 1 July 2018, lmtribune.com/business/the-gag-clause/article_8c269796-7d54-5116-86ca-f3e59da23fae.html.
  7. Cauchi, Richard. “Ncsl.org – Legislative News, Studies and Analysis.” Prohibiting PBM “Gag Clauses” That Restrict Pharmacists from Disclosing Price Options: Recent State Legislation 2016-2018, 22 Aug. 2018, pm, ncsl.org/.
  8. Gallup, Inc, and Megan Brenan. “Nurses Keep Healthy Lead as Most Honest, Ethical Profession.” com, 26 Dec. 2017, news.gallup.com/poll/224639/nurses-keep-healthy-lead-honest-ethical-profession.aspx.

Download the free WellRx app from the iOS app store or the Google Play Store,
and get registered to take advantage of our free medication adherence tools.

If you’re struggling to afford your prescription medications,
visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you.
You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!

 

Read public reviews of the ScriptSave WellRx program on Trustpilot. Today we are ranked:
Human score    Trustpilot Stars    number of reviews    Trustpilot Logo

get the best rx prescription savings - scirptsave wellrx blog image

For most Americans, chances are good you’re spending too much on your prescription medications. The increasing cost is staggering. And with so many companies offering discounts on prescriptions, it can sound like a scam. As the saying goes, if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

ScriptSave® WellRx is part of Medical Security Card Company, LLC; bringing some of the most advanced technology, pharmacy expertise and customer service in the industry for more than 20 years.

While we can tell you what we do and how we really can help you save on your prescription costs, we’d rather let you see what folks who have saved, some who were skeptics, have to say.

get the best rx savings card free - scriptsave wellrx - blog image find the best rx price - scriptsave wellrx - blog image







And, yes. We even help with the cost of some pet medications!

get your best rx savings card free - scriptsave wellrx blog image

Get your free Rx discount card!

If you need assistance affording your prescriptions, sign up for a free ScriptSave WellRx card or download the free prescription savings app, and save on your medications next time you visit the pharmacy.

 

Read public reviews of the ScriptSave WellRx program on Trustpilot. Today we are ranked:

Human score    Trustpilot Stars    number of reviews    Trustpilot Logo

0 views

rising insulin costs - scriptsave wellrx blog image

by Eli Kengerlinski, 2019 PharmD Candidate
University of Florida College of Pharmacy

Over the years, insulin prices have increased in accordance with newly developed insulins that have come to market. Traditional insulins, short and intermediate acting, as compared to newer rapid and long acting insulins, are less expensive in market value.1 Biosimilar traditional insulins with expired patents (some since 2000) may be a better option for some patients, as their market price has significantly dropped over the years. However, many patients are still having trouble affording their monthly Lantus or Humalog due to their high copays.

Why is insulin important?

Insulin plays an important role in managing patients with Diabetes Mellitus (DM). Patients with Type 1 DM have limited ability to produce endogenous insulin due to their pancreas’s inability to properly function. Patients with Type 2 DM can also have increased dependence on insulin therapy use as their disease state progresses. It is crucial for certain diabetic patient populations to have insulin at hand as they cannot control their sugar levels with just oral medications (eg. Metformin) that have no effect on insulin production. Type 1 DM population, there’s a greater need for basal (intermediate or long acting) as well as mealtime (rapid or short acting) insulin.

What options do you have?

Lifestyle modifications towards a healthier diet and exercise can be the most important changes any diabetic can make, and help ensure proper management of your condition. Monitoring your daily sugar levels, managing your weight via carb counting or following the plate method2, as well as exercising 30 minutes a day, five times a week, are all great habits to ensure effective DM management.

From January 2014 to July 2018, short and intermediate acting insulins have dropped in price equaling less than half of rapid and long acting insulins in the market today.1 Even if newer insulins offer better sugar control, their high prices make it difficult for patient access. For these specific patient populations, traditional insulins should be considered to ensure patient adherence to DM therapy and prevent patients using less of their insulin. If you’re having trouble paying for your insulin, then ask your provider if short and intermediate acting insulins would be right for you. Also contact your insurance company to see if you qualify for additional programs (eg. Medicare, Medicaid).

Furthermore, ask your provider if there are generic alternatives to your rapid or long acting insulin. For example, Admelog costs 12 to 15% less than Humalog while Basaglar costs about 15% less than Lantus on a per insulin unit basis.3 Therefore, it is important to ask for biosimilar generics that have the same active ingredient as they are usually cheaper.

Another affordable alternative to ensure access to insulin would be switching patients on high cost insulin pens to vials. Even though pens are more convenient and patient friendly, vials should be considered, especially if you’re having trouble affording your insulin. However, do ensure that you are instructed on how to properly inject your insulin.

If you’re still having trouble affording your insulin, ask your local pharmacist for a manufacturer savings card. If you need help with diabetic medications, visit www.wellrx.com for substantial prescription savings at pharmacies throughout the U.S. and Puerto Rico.

REFERENCES:

  1. Eisenberg Center at Oregon Health & Science University. Premixed Insulin Analogues: A Comparison With Other Treatments for Type 2 Diabetes. 2009 Mar 25. In: Comparative Effectiveness Review Summary Guides for Clinicians [Internet]. Rockville (MD): Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US); 2007-. [Table], Price of Insulin. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK45287/table/clininsulin.tu1/
  2. Lara Hamilton. “How to Create Your Plate.” Diabetes Forecast, Nov. 2015, diabetesforecast.org/2015/adm/diabetes-plate-method/how-to-create-your-plate.html
  3. “Sanofi Launches Follow-On Insulin Lispro, Admelog.” The Center for Biosimilars Staff, 9 Apr. 2018, www.centerforbiosimilars.com/news/sanofi-launches-followon-insulin-lispro-admelog.

For the best Rx price on
prescription medications,
visit www.WellRx.com.
Compare prices at more than
62,000 pharmacies nationwide.

0 views

immunization changes for 2018 - scriptsave wellrx blog image

by Samantha McKinnon, PharmD Candidate 2019
University of Arizona College of Pharmacy

With flu season right around the corner, what better time to talk about vaccines than right now?  We talk and hear about vaccines a lot, but what exactly is a vaccine, and which vaccine is right for you?

What is a vaccine?

In the simplest terms, a vaccine is medicine created from weakened or dead disease-causing germs given to you to help prevent you from getting sick or prepare your body in case you are infected.1 Vaccines can be created using different strategies, depending on who the vaccine is intended for and what disease is trying to be prevented.  There are live, inactivated, recombinant and toxoid vaccines; each serves a different purpose and treats a different germ.1 The way they work is to expose you to a small and safe amount of the germ so your body will recognize it in the future by creating antibodies.  Antibodies are what allow your body to fight off infections or you experience a much milder version of the illness.2   You may sometimes see terminology like “trivalent” or “quadrivalent” when you’re looking at different flu vaccines.3 Trivalent vaccines contain three different strains of virus whereas quadrivalent vaccines contain four different strains of virus.  There also “high-dose” flu vaccine formulations, these formulations contain extra amount of virus material to help people create more antibodies.1

Live vaccines

Live vaccines are also called sometimes called “attenuated” – which is a fancy term for “weakened”. Some examples of live vaccines you or children may have received would be measles, mumps, rubella (MMR), chickenpox or even smallpox.  Live vaccines take the entire virus and weaken it so that it can’t get you as sick as the regular beefed-up virus.  Imagine you have two runners getting ready to run a marathon, but one of the runners has 20-pound boots on, who will win the race?  It’s going to be much harder for the runner with boots to cross the finish line, this is essentially what attenuating viruses do.  Live vaccines do come with some risks, especially to people with weaker immune systems such as someone that had an organ transplant or someone with cancer.

Inactivated vaccines

Vaccines that inactivate the virus also use the entire virus but instead of being weakened like a live vaccine, it is completely dead.  Inactivated vaccines are the typical flu shots, polio and rabies.  Because these germs are completely dead you will not get sick, but this means you will also not be immune and need more frequent shots.3 This is one reason for an annual flu shot.

Recombinant vaccines

Recombinant is technical term that basically means mixed up, it would be like switching some letters around in the alphabet to be CBADEFG instead of ABCDEFG, it’s still the alphabet but not in the exact order it used to be.  These vaccines use only very specific pieces of the germ, a “target”, which will create a strong response in the person receiving the shot.  The bonus is that the vaccine does not have the entire germ, so you won’t get sick and they can be used on more people than live or inactivated vaccines – a big plus for patients with weaker immune systems.  Some recombinant vaccines currently used are for Hepatitis B, meningitis, shingles and whooping cough.

What changed for this year?

Now that you know about all the different kinds of vaccines we can talk about the new changes for this year.  Besides the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) there is also another government body called The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) that provides recommendations for what immunizations are needed and when.  Previous flu seasons did not have very good coverage against H1N1 so live viruses were not recommended for children.  That has changed this year, ACIP has recommended that eligible patients receive the FluMist intranasal spray, a live attenuated vaccine, this is good news for parents and kids as there is no needle and no shot.4 The recombinant flu shot called Flublok is recommended for pregnant women. For the older population there has been a change to the zoster vaccination recommendation.  ACIP recommends the recombinant Shingrix vaccine for prevention of shingles in adults over the age of 50.4 Shingrix is a two-dose vaccine just like the previous shingles vaccination Zostavax but has been found to be more effective than Zostavax, most especially in patients over the age of 80.5 The final changed recommendation is in regard to the live MMR vaccine.  Traditionally it has been a two-dose vaccine and that covered you for life.  With recent measles outbreaks, patients living in an area with an outbreak are recommended to receive a third dose of MMR.5

What vaccine is right for you?

The CDC releases an immunization schedule for all patient populations and revises it as new evidence comes to light.  The recommendations from ACIP have allowed the CDC to release a newly revised immunization schedule effective for 2018.  Based on your age and your health you may get different versions of vaccines or vaccinated at different times in your life than other people.  Your provider or pharmacist would be happy to let you know which vaccines are right for you and when, since some vaccines are age-specific.  It is especially important to let health professionals treating you know your health status and social history such as if you smoke tobacco or drink alcohol, if you’ve recently been sick or had a fever, what kind of environment you work in, if you’ll be around newborns or elderly people, your HIV status or if you have liver problems or blood factor issues as well as any allergies.  If you travel outside of the US, especially to an area that requires you to use antivirals, let your prescriber know as this may affect your vaccinations.  Some countries also require special immunizations before you may be allowed to enter, be sure to check these recommendations on the CDC website.

The importance of getting vaccinated

Diseases like polio, measles, whooping cough, flu can be prevented with vaccines.  Without vaccines people that caught these viruses could be paralyzed, blinded, lose their hearing, or even die.  In 2015 there were 710,000 people hospitalized for flu and over 56,000 of them died.  There are some patients that can not be vaccinated and depend on others to be vaccinated so they do not get sick.  This is called “herd immunity,” the more people that are vaccinated, the healthier everyone will be.  So don’t wait, get vaccinated today!

 

References

  1. www.vaccines.gov/basics
  2. www.newsinhealth.gov/nih/2016/07/safeguarding-our-health
  3. Felicilda-Reynaldo RF, “Types of flu vaccines for yearly immunization.” MedSurg Nursing, July-Aug. 2014, p. 256
  4. Grohskopf LA, Sokolow LZ, Broder KR, et al. Prevention and control of seasonal influenza with vaccines: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices United States 2018-2019 influenza season. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2018.
  5. Kim DK, Riley LE, Hunter P. Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices Recommended Immunization Schedule for Adults Aged 19 Years or Older – United States, 2018. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2018; 67:158.

If you’re struggling to afford your medications,
visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you.
You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!

0 views

lowest prescription prices - scriptsave wellrx image

Every day we receive phone calls, emails, and comments from patients about the staggering prices they pay for the prescription medications they need. People are struggling to afford their medical bills. We get it. That’s why we are providing tips to help you save money at the pharmacy counter.

Here’s how to receive discounts on your prescription drugs:

1. Compare Rx Drug Prices at Different Pharmacies

It may come as surprise, but medication prices vary from one pharmacy to another. This is because pharmacies negotiate rates with drug manufacturers for the various medications they carry. Each pharmacy negotiates different prices, which means you could be asked to pay $65 when filling your prescription at one pharmacy and only $45 when filling the same prescription at another pharmacy.

One of the easiest ways to save money on your medication is to do a quick price comparison online before heading to the pharmacy. At ScriptSave WellRx, we provide a free cost-checking tool so you can compare Rx drug prices in your area and find the best discount.

2. Use a Prescription Discount Card

Regardless of whether you have health insurance or not, you can save money at the pharmacy counter by using a prescription discount card. Rx savings programs work by negotiating discounted cash prices on both generic and brand name medications. Patients can then receive cheaper prescriptions by showing their Rx card at participating pharmacies. It’s really that simple.

Most savings cards, including ScriptSave WellRx, are totally free to use, and they are accepted at pharmacies nationwide. For some patients, using a prescription discount card to pay cash for their medication may be cheaper than their insurance co-pay!

get a free scriptsave wellrx discount card

3. Ask Your Doctor or Pharmacist About Other Options

Your healthcare provider is also a great resource when looking for alternative ways to save money on your prescriptions. If you’re having trouble affording your medications, remember to ask your doctor or pharmacist if there are cheaper generic versions available, or if any other cost-saving alternatives exist.

4. Redeem Drug Manufacturer Coupons

If you are taking a brand name medication, the drug company manufacturing it may offer a coupon which can be applied to the cash price of your prescription. The best way to find out if there are any manufacturer coupons available for your medication is to check the drug company’s website for valid discount offers.

5. Consider a Prescription Assistance Program

Depending on your situation and what medications you’ve been prescribed, you may be eligible to receive additional help through the Medicine Assistance Tool (MAT) provided by the pharmaceutical industry trade organization PhRMA—Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America. MAT is a program that connects patients with available medication assistance resources based on the information they provide.

How Much Will You Save?

0 views

Prescription options for allergy meds - scriptsave wellrx

by Marcus Harding
PharmD Candidate Class of 2019, University of Arizona

Seasonal allergies affect anywhere between 10-30% of people worldwide.1 Allergies to one or more common allergens are reaching upwards of 40-50% in school children.1 Allergies occur due to an immune response to something the body considers “foreign,” in other words, strange or unfamiliar. When in contact with the “allergen,” the body produces antibodies which release a chemical called histamine. Histamine and some other chemicals are what cause allergic reactions.1,3

Symptoms of a seasonal allergic response include but are not limited to:3

  • Sneezing and a runny nose
  • Itchy nose and throat
  • Itchy, watery eyes

Symptoms of a more severe allergic response include:

  • Shortness of breath
  • Rash
  • Welts
  • Swelling of mucous membranes

What to Do

When seasonal allergic symptoms occur, you should talk to your primary healthcare provider for help. While your physician can prescribe medications to minimize these symptoms, it is rare that they would be covered by your insurance. This is because most of the medications used for allergies are “over-the-counter” (OTC) medications. This means these medications can be purchased without a prescription, and can be easily found at your local drug store. If you are expecting a medication to be covered by your insurance, but find that it is not, there are options for you. Despite these medications being OTC, they can still be rather expensive, and if you need the medication consistently, the cost can add up. So, what are your options when it comes to these medications if your insurance won’t cover them?

There are many resources available to help you find the best price for OTC medications. The ScriptSave® WellRx app is free and can help you find the best price based on your location. If your physician writes a prescription for an OTC medication, you can use the ScriptSave WellRx app or discount card to get savings on that drug. You can visit www.WellRx.com to download a free card and find the cheapest cash price at a nearby pharmacy.

Lastly, your local pharmacist is a great resource when it comes to cost savings. They are a wealth of knowledge as it pertains to medication information and cost, and if they do not know the answer, they will know where and how to find the answer.

Allergy Medication Options

So now that you have the resources to find the best price, how can you decide which medication to choose? There are so many different types of medications for seasonal allergies, it is hard to know which is the best for you.

Antihistamines are the most common type of medication used for seasonal allergies.1 These are divided into two types, which are the first and second-generation antihistamines. The first-generation antihistamines are more likely to cause drowsiness and sedation compared to the second generation.2 The OTC first-generation antihistamines include:

The OTC second-generation antihistamines include

Second-generation antihistamines are not only less sedating, but also last longer, and are most often only needed once a day, whereas first-generation anti-histamines may need to be taken multiple times a day. All of these examples can be found as tablets, capsules, or suspensions.2

Some common side effects to look out for are:2

  • Dizziness/drowsiness (more common in first-generation)
  • Dry mouth
  • Blurred vision
  • Nausea/vomiting
  • Confusion

Another type of medication that can be used for seasonal allergies is nasal decongestants.1 These medications help to shrink the blood vessels in your nose to reduce the amount of leaking from your nose. These medications result in rapid relief of nasal congestion; however, they are only recommended for 3-5 days of use. Using these medications any longer than the recommendation can cause “rebound congestion,” basically making your symptoms worse. There are several different forms of these medications including topical, oral tablets and nasal sprays.4

Some of the side effects of these medications include:4

  • Rapid and irregular heartbeat
  • irritability
  • nasal dryness
  • high blood pressure
  • difficulty sleeping
  • loss of appetite
  • urinary retention
  • dizziness

Keep in mind that there are daily and monthly limits to the amount of Sudafed you can purchase based on state laws. Although these medications can act rapidly and help with symptoms right away, they should not be used for more than 5 days at a time.4

One last common type of OTC medication used for seasonal allergies is nasal corticosteroids1. These medications act to slow down the body’s immune response to the allergen, reducing the amount of inflammation. Although there are corticosteroids that work for the whole body, these are nasal sprays that are directed to the nose to help with symptoms that occur locally or in the general area, therefore, there are very few of the normal side effects of steroids because the medication is specifically targeted to the nose. Most of the side effects that can happen are in the nose/throat area, although they are not very common.4

The current nasal corticosteroids include:

The side effects of these medications can include:4

  • Nausea
  • Headache
  • Cough
  • Nose bleeds
  • Congestion
  • Throat swelling/irritation
  • Upper respiratory infection.

There are many options for treating your allergies with over the counter medications, including medications that are not antihistamines. If your doctor prescribes a medication and it is not covered by insurance, talk to your pharmacist about OTC alternatives and use the resources available to you to find the best price. That way you can treat your symptoms, feel better, and keep more money in your pocket.

 

References

  1. American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. (2018). AAAA. Retrieved from http://www.aaaai.org/. Accessed on 5/16/2018.
  2. Carson S, Lee N, Thakurta S. Drug Class Review: Newer Antihistamines: Final Report Update 2 [Internet]. Portland (OR): Oregon Health & Science University; 2010 May. Introduction. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK50554/
  3. Jeffrey L. Kishiyama, M. (2014). Pathophysiology of Disease: An Introduction to Clinical Medicine, 7e. Gary D. Hammer, MD, PhD, Stephen J. McPhee, MD.
  4. Platt, Michael. International Forum of Allergy & Rhinology. Sep2014 Supplement, Vol. 4, pS35-S40. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25182353

If you’re struggling to afford your medications,
visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you.
You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!

0 views