2019 generics - scriptsave wellrx blog image

by Haley Stenquist, PharmD Candidate Class of 2019
The University of Arizona College of Pharmacy

A new group of generic medications are hitting the prescription drug market in 2019. At ScriptSave, we get a lot of questions about generic medications vs. brand name prescription drugs. “A” rated generics meet the same quality standards as brand name prescription drugs and so they provide the same medical benefits. A drug that is “A” rated by the FDA as a generic equivalent contains identical active ingredients as the brand name drug, the same dosage as the brand name drug, and delivers the same concentrations of drug to the bloodstream within the same amount of time. So what are the differences and what’s coming to a pharmacy near you?

Are Generic Drugs the Same as Brand Name?

Yes, generic drugs are “copies” of the brand name medication that was developed by a company other than the one that originally brought the branded medication to market. Generic drugs are available for a fraction of the price of brand name medications, so consumers are naturally eager for the generics to hit the market. Per the FDA guidelines, a generic drug application must first display the following parameters:

  • The generic drug is “pharmaceutically equivalent” to the brand
  • The manufacturer is capable of making the drug correctly
  • The manufacturer is capable of making the drug consistently
  • The “active ingredient” is the same as that of the brand
  • The right amount of the active ingredient gets to the place in the body where it has effect
  • The “inactive” ingredients of the drug are safe
  • The drug does not break down over time
  • The container in which the drug will be shipped and sold is appropriate
  • The label is the same as the brand-name drug’s label
  • Relevant patents or legal exclusivities are expired2

How Long Does It Take for a Drug to Become Generic?

After an application for a patent of a new drug is filed with the United States, it is granted patent exclusivity for 20 years.  The path to generic drugs coming to market was made cheaper, easier, and faster after the introduction of the Drug Price Competition and Patent-Term Restoration Act of 1984 or known as the Hatch-Waxman Act. This allowed companies to submit an abbreviated new drug application (ANDA). About one year before the expiration of the patent drug, companies that are wanting to manufacture the generic drug will submit the ANDA to the FDA. Generally, after that patent has expired and the ANDA is approved, a generic counterpart can be introduced into the market.1

First Generic Drug Approvals for 2019

Currently, the FDA has approved 16 first-time generics in 2019 between different manufacturers (each manufacturer must submit their own ANDA). These include:

  • pyridostigmine bromide syrup—Mestinon Syrup
    • Improves muscle strengths in patients with myasthenia gravis
    • Novitium Pharma LLC—03/08/2019
  • levofloxacin ophthalmic solution, 1.5%—Iquix Ophthalmic Solution
    • Treatment of corneal ulcer caused by certain bacteria
    • Micro Labs Limited, India—02/27/2019
  • deferiprone tablets, 500mg—Ferriprox Tablets
    • Treatment of transfusional iron overload due to thalassemia syndromes
    • Taro Pharmaceuticals Industries Limited—02/08/2019
  • sevelamer hydrochloride tablets, 400mg, 800mg—Renagel Tablets
    • Control of serum phosphorus in patient with chronic kidney disease
    • Glenmark Pharmaceuticals Limited—02/08/2019
  • levomilnacipran extended-release capsules, 20mg, 40mg, 80mg, 120mg—Fetzima
    • Treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD)
    • Amneal Pharmaceuticals Company GmbH—02/04/2019
  • acyclovir cream, 5%—Zovirax Cream
    • Treatment of recurrent cold sores in immunocompetent patients over 12 years of age
    • Perrigo UK FINCO Limited Partnership—02/04/2019
  • Wixela Inhub (fluticasone propionate and salmeterol inhalation powder, USP) 100mcg/50mcg, 250mcg/50mcg, 500mcg/50mcg—Advair Diskus
    • Treatment of asthma in patient over 4 years of age and COPD maintenance (250mcg/50mcg)
    • Mylan Pharmaceuticals Inc.—01/30/2019
  • sirolimus oral solution, 1 mg/mL—Rapamune
    • Prophylaxis of kidney organ rejection in patient over 13 years of age
    • Novitium Pharma LLC—01/28/2019
  • vigabatrin tablets USP, 500mg—Sabril Tablets
    • Treatment of refractory complex partial seizures (CPS) in patients over 10 years of age that have failed multiple alternative treatments
    • Teva Pharmaceuticals USA, Inc.—01/14/2019
  • ingenol mebutate gel, 0.05%, 0.015%—Picato Gel
    • Treatment of topical acne
    • Perrigo UK PINCO Limited Partnership—01/07/2019 (0.015%) and 01/09/2019 (0.05%)
  • lurasidone hydrochloride tablets, 20mg, 40mg, 60mg, 80mg, 120mg—Latuda Tablets
    • Treatment of schizophrenia and depressive episodes associated with bipolar disorder in adults
    • Torrent Pharmaceuticals Limited, Accord Healthcare Inc., Lupin Limited, InvaGen Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Amneal Pharmaceuticals Company GmbH—01/03/20193

Newest Generics of 2019

  • As of 03/12/2019, the FDA approved a new generic of Diovan (valsartan) among the vast recalls from multiple manufacturers, this was granted to Alkem Laboratories Limited.4
  • Lannett announced FDA approval for aspirin and extended-release dipyridamole capsules, 25mg/200mg—Aggrenox Capsules for secondary prevention of stroke and transient ischemic attacks (TIA) on 03/27/2019.5

Forecasted Generics for the Remainder of 2019

The Impact of Generics

It is a long, grueling process for a brand name medication to finally be released to the market as a generic, taking in excess of 20 years. Generic medications are instrumental in helping alleviate the financial burden of prescription medication costs in patients. Each year, the effect continues to grow. In the first quarter 2019, there is already a large impact with new generic medications coming to market. This impact is forecast to continue throughout the year, especially with the possibility of heavy hitters such as Lyrica and Restasis.

References:

  1. “S.1538 – 98th Congress (1983-1984): An Act to Amend the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act to Revise the Procedures for New Drug Applications, to Amend Title 35, United States Code, to Authorize the Extension of the Patents for Certain Regulated Products, and for Other Purposes.” gov, 24 Sept. 1984, www.congress.gov/bill/98th-congress/senate-bill/01538.
  2. Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Generic Drugs – What Is the Approval Process for Generic Drugs?” U S Food and Drug Administration Home Page, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, www.fda.gov/drugs/resourcesforyou/consumers/buyingusingmedicinesafely/genericdrugs/ucm506040.htm .
  3. Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “First Generic Drug Approvals.” U S Food and Drug Administration Home Page, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, fda.gov/Drugs/DevelopmentApprovalProcess/HowDrugsareDevelopedandApproved/DrugandBiologicApprovalReports/
    ANDAGenericDrugApprovals/default.htm
    .
  4. Office of the Commissioner. “Press Announcements – FDA Provides Update on Its Ongoing Investigation into ARB Drug Products; Reports on Finding of a New Nitrosamine Impurity in Certain Lots of Losartan and Product Recall.” U S Food and Drug Administration Home Page, Office of the Commissioner, fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm632425.htm.
  5. “Generic Drug for Stroke Prevention Granted FDA Approval.” Pharmacy Times, pharmacytimes.com/news/genericdrug-granted-fda-approval.
  6. “Pipeline Report Generic Drugs .” Welldynerx. welldynerx.com/content/uploads/2019/02/Generic-Drugs-Feb-2019-2-12-19.pdf.
  7. “Upcoming Generic Drugs.” Corporate Pharmacy Services, corporatepharmacy.com/page/upcoming_generic_drugs.

 

0 views

hepatitis c medications image - scriptsave wellrx blog

by Jamie L. Voigtmann, PharmD Candidate 2019
Saint Louis College of Pharmacy

In 2014, approximately 4 million people in the United States were infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV).1 According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), acute HCV infections reported in the United States increased approximately 3.5 times from 2010-2016 (from 850 to 2,967 cases).2 The speculated reasons for this massive increase have been due to increased intravenous drug use (IVDU) as well as more specific & sensitive testing.

There are six genotypes of HCV that have been identified; but of these six, only three make up 97% of HCV infections in the United States.1 These three genotypes include Type 1 (both subtypes a & b), Type 2, and Type 3. HCV was initially discovered in 1989 and since then, a search for a cure has become imminent as HCV plays a major role in the development of chronic liver disease, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and commonly ends in the need for liver transplantation.3

Hepatitis Medications Today

Multiple medications have been proven to treat and/or cure of HCV. A cure is defined as a sustained virologic response (SVR) resulting in an undetectable HCV RNA, 12-24 weeks after treatment is completed.1 In the past, a medication called interferons were used to boost the immune system and attack HCV to defend the body; but in the 2017 AASLD/IDSA Guidelines, interferons are no longer recommended in the treatment of HCV.4 Ribavirin has also been used for acute HCV in the past, but now is only indicated for chronic cases of HCV.7 With both interferon and ribavirin, virological response did not often exceed 50%. Since 2014, four once daily HCV medications have been FDA approved for the treatment of acute HCV in naïve patients that exceed a virological response of 90% after 12 weeks of therapy.4

These more novel hepatitis medications consist of multiple drugs with differing modes of action. There are three classes of drugs that are used to treat HCV and they are called direct acting antivirals (DAA) because they directly attack the HCV genome and replication process.4 These three DAA classes include: NS3/4A Protease Inhibitors, NS5A Inhibitors, and NS5B Polymerase Inhibitors (Nucleoside & Non-Nucleoside).4 All of these medications inhibit replication of HCV in the host cell, stopping the life cycle and preventing its transmission to other host cells. Below is a picture that further explains the mechanism of action of each DAA along with each HCV drug and its corresponding DAA class.5

hepatitis c vaccinations - scriptsave wellrx blog imageDirect Acting Antiviral Classes5

  • NS3/4A Protease Inhibitors
    • Boceprevir
    • Telaprevir
    • Simeprevir
    • Asunaprevir
    • Paritaprevir
    • Grazoprevir
    • Glecaprevir
  • NS5A Inhibitors
    • Daclatasvir
    • Ledipasvir
    • Ombitasvir
    • Elbasvir
    • Velpatasvir
    • Pibrentasvir
  • NS5B Polymerase Inhibitors
    • Sofosbuvir
    • Dasabuvir

Comparing Four Novel HCV Medications6

As mentioned previously, there are four HCV medications approved by the FDA that are one pill taken once daily and can result in cure. These medications include Harvoni (ledipasvir/sofosbuvir), Zepatier (elbasvir/grazoprevir), Epclusa (velpatasvir/sofosbuvir), and Mavyret (glecaprevir/pibrentasvir). Harvoni was approved by the FDA in 2014, Zepatier and Epclusa in 2016, and finally Mavyret in 2017. This is relevant because the two more recent drugs, Epclusa and Mavyret, treat all 6 genotypes of HCV while Harvoni and Zepatier are both first line therapy for genotypes 1 and 4.7

Unlike their differing genotype coverage, side effects for all four of these medications are quite similar. The most common side effects include headache, fatigue, and nausea and the instances for these side effects are approximately 16%, 13%, and 9%, respectively. Other more severe side effects (anemia, diarrhea, insomnia, and irritability) have been reported with these medications but only in combination with interferon or ribavirin as well as with prolonged therapy between 16-24 weeks.5

Cost of Therapy

According to current HCV Guidelines, Harvoni, Zepatier, and Epclusa require 12 weeks (84 days) of therapy.7 Mavyret can be either 8 weeks (56 days) or 12 weeks of therapy depending on the patient’s baseline liver disease.7 Unfortunately, considering both the high cost of medication as well as the long duration of therapy does not allow all patient’s to receive treatment. Harvoni and Epclusa have generics available for patients, and the Brand Name options of Zepatier and Mavyret are thankfully in the same price range as the other generic options. The cost of one tablet for these medications is as follows:6

  • Harvoni:
    • Brand Name: $1,350
    • Generic: $500
  • Epclusa:
    • Brand Name: $1,050
    • Generic: $350
  • Zepatier:
    • Brand Name: $300
  • Mavyret:
    • Brand Name: $200

Because these medications are very costly, a 12-week drug treatment regimen of therapy ranges from $16,800 to $113,400. This is a problem. Many patient’s simply do not have this amount of money to spend on one prescription. This further leads to controversial discussions because as mentioned earlier, HCV plays a major role in the development of chronic liver disease, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and commonly ends in the need for liver transplantation.3

Fortunately, there are patient assistance programs and copay cards offered by the manufacturers of these medications which allow a minimum cost of $0 with patient assistance programs and a minimum cost of $5 for copay cards per 4-week supply. Harvoni and Epclusa are manufactured by Gilead Sciences, Zepatier is manufactured by Merck, and Mavyret is manufactured by AbbVie.

Patient assistance programs require paperwork completed by the patient as well as the prescribing physician. Copay cards only work for Brand Name medications and most commonly require private insurance as a primary payor (not government funded insurances such as Tricare, Medicare, or Medicaid). For more information, check out these websites:

If you need help affording other prescription medications, visit www.WellRx.com. Many prices are lower than insurance copay costs!

References

  1. Kohli A, Shaffer A, Sherman A, Kottilil S. Treatment of hepatitis C: a systematic review. JAMA. 2014;312(6):631-640.
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Surveillance for viral hepatitis – united states, 2016. https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/statistics/2016surveillance/commentary.htm. Accessed on February 13, 2019.
  3. Chen SL, Morgan TR. The natural history of hepatitis c virus (hcv) infection. Int J Med Sci. 2006;3(2):47-52.
  4. Geddawy A, Ibrahim YF, Elbahie NM, Ibrahim MA. Direct acting anti-hepatitis c virus drugs: clinical pharmacology and future direction. J Transl Int Med. 2017;5(1): 8–17.
  5. Dugum M, O’Shea R. Hepatitis c virus: here comes all-oral treatment. Clev Clin J Med. 2014;81(3):159-172.
  6. HCV Treatments: Harvoni, Zepatier, Epclusa, & Mavyret. Lexi-Drugs. Lexicomp. Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. Riverwoods, IL. Available at: http://online.lexi.com. February 13, 2019.
  7. Recommendations for testing, managing, and treating hepatitis c. Joint panel from the American Association of the Study of Liver Disease and the Infectious Diseases Society of America. https://www.hcvguidelines.org. Accessed February 13, 2019.

Human score    Trustpilot Stars    number of reviews    Trustpilot Logo

0 views

pneumonia vaccine image - scriptsave wellrx blog

by Cindy Cho, PharmD Candidate Class of 2019,
The University of Arizona College of Pharmacy

In short, no. You cannot get pneumonia from the pneumonia vaccine. With all of the news coverage about vaccines, it is important to equip yourself with the knowledge on what vaccines are, how they work, and why they don’t cause disease, so you can make an informed decision on your health.

What is a vaccine?

A vaccine is a substance that contains very small amounts of weakened or dead germs to stimulate your body to produce immunity against certain diseases. Before the invention of vaccinations, the only way a person’s body can gain immunity to certain diseases is to (hopefully) survive an infection from the germ that causes the disease. For example, if a person gets pneumonia, an infection of the lung, from a certain germ and survives, their body will remember that specific germ if it were to come across it again. By remembering the germ, the body can protect itself and fight off the infection more efficiently to prevent sickness in the future. Vaccines provide a similar immune system response to help the body create immune system cells to remember disease-causing germs to protect your body, but the best part is that vaccines don’t come with the risks of getting the actual disease or its associated complications. Some vaccines can provide protection against multiple types of germs that cause the same disease to better protect against epidemics.1

What are pneumonia vaccines?

Now that you understand how vaccines work, let’s talk about the pneumonia vaccines! There are two pneumonia vaccines intended for use in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which includes the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13 or Prevnar 13) and the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23 or Pneumovax 23).2 Both of these pneumonia vaccines contain inactivated, or dead, germs. Because these vaccines contain dead germs, they cannot replicate in the body or cause disease.1 The differences between the two pneumonia vaccines are shown below:

  • Prevnar 13: this is a conjugated vaccine, which means it contains a protein that is joined to a part of dead bacteria to improve the protection the vaccine provides. Doctors give this vaccine to children at 2, 4, 6, and 12 through 15 months old. Young children need multiple doses of this vaccine to boost their protection since their immune system is not yet mature. Adults who need this vaccine only get a single dose. The vaccine has 13 in its name because it helps protect against 13 types of pneumococcal bacteria that most commonly causes serious infections in children and adults.2
  • Pneumovax 23:  this is a polysaccharide vaccine, which means it is made to look like the surface of certain bacteria in order to help the body build protection against that germ. Doctors give a single dose of this vaccine to people who need it. CDC recommends one or two additional doses for people with certain chronic medical conditions. The vaccine has 23 in its name because it helps protect against serious infections caused by 23 types of pneumococcal bacteria.2

 So, who needs the pneumonia vaccines?

Great question! Pneumonia disproportionately affects the young, the elderly, and the immunocompromised, so the CDC recommends these vulnerable patient populations to receive the pneumonia vaccines.3 The CDC created an immunization schedule that outlines when the two pneumonia vaccines should be received.

CDC recommends vaccination with the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13 or Prevnar 13®) for:2

  • All children younger than 2 years old
  • All adults 65 years or older
  • People 2 through 64 years old with certain medical conditions*

CDC recommends vaccination with the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23 or Pneumovax23®) for:2

  • All adults 65 years or older
  • People 2 through 64 years old with certain medical conditions*
  • Adults 19 through 64 years old who smoke cigarettes

*Certain medical conditions such as: chronic heart disease, lung disease, liver disease, diabetes, HIV, or certain cancers warrant some adults to receive the pneumonia vaccines before the age of 65.4

What are the side effects of the pneumonia vaccines?

Reactions to the pneumonia vaccine can occur, such as cold-like symptoms, but it is important to realize that those are adverse reactions to the vaccine and not pneumonia itself. Talk to your doctor if you have allergies to any ingredients in vaccines. Below are common adverse reactions to the pneumonia vaccines:

Mild side effects reported with Prevnar 13 can include:2

  • Reactions where the shot was given
    • Redness
    • Swelling
    • Pain or tenderness
  • Fever
  • Loss of appetite
  • Fussiness (irritability)
  • Feeling tired
  • Headache
  • Chills

Mild side effects reported with Pneumovax23 can include:2

  • Reactions where the shot was given
    • Redness
    • Pain
  • Fever
  • Muscle aches

Why are the pneumonia vaccines important?

Vaccines, like the pneumonia vaccines, can prevent or decrease the severity of diseases. Unfortunately, around 50,000 people die from pneumonia in the United States each year.3 It is passed along through airborne droplets, such as from a cough or sneeze, so it is a highly contagious infection.2 It is crucial to receive the pneumococcal vaccine to not only protect yourself but to protect your loved ones around you. Especially if you have a breathing condition like asthma or COPD, it is important to have the pneumonia vaccines to prevent respiratory infections that can potentially make your breathing worse. Talk to your provider or local pharmacy if you are due for your pneumonia vaccine today.

References:

  1. Principles of Vaccination. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/prinvac.html. Published September 8, 2015. Accessed February 14, 2019.
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/pneumo/public/index.html. Published December 6, 2017. Accessed February 14, 2019.
  3. Top 20 Pneumonia Facts (2018). American Thoracic Society.  https://www.thoracic.org/patients/patient-resources/resources/top-pneumonia-facts.pdf. Accessed February 14, 2019.
  4. Recommended Adult Immunization Schedule for ages 19 years or older, United States, 2019. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/hcp/imz/adult.html#note-pneumo. Published January 2019. Accessed February 14, 2019.

 


Human score    Trustpilot Stars    number of reviews    Trustpilot Logo

Visit www.WellRx.com to find the
lowest medication prices
at pharmacies near you!
0 views

ScriptSave WellRx app pill refill reminders - blog image

by Dan Johnson, RPh and PharmD,
Vice President of Network Strategy, ScriptSave

The risk for medication interactions dramatically increases as patients take multiple drugs. ScriptSave’s own Dr. Dan Johnson recently had an article published on the Living Better 50 website on steps you can take to protect yourself from dangerous drug interactions.

*****

More than 2 million patients are hospitalized every year after they inadvertently mix their prescription drugs, while another 100,000 die annually. And the statistics get worse with age. The chance of an adverse drug reaction for people over 50 jumps 33 percent versus younger people.

Even over-the-counter medications and supplements can incite dangerous health risks.For example, patients with high blood pressure should avoid taking cough medicines with decongestants and should consult their pharmacist on the best options to seek relief from cold and flu symptoms. Patients taking prescriptions for depression, chest pain, ADHD, gout, arthritis and other common ailments can frequently be at more risk for dangerous reactions if they don’t keep track of their prescription regimen.

How Can Patients Protect Themselves From Drug Interactions?

  1. Ideally, patients should go to the same pharmacist and discuss any other prescriptions they may be taking. This conversation should include over-the-counter and supplements – in addition to any medications.
  2. Be aware of how common household foods can impact medications. People who take Lipitor or Zocor with grapefruit juice may experience muscle pain and other side effects.
  3. As we age, our bodies metabolize drugs slower and at different rates. Because of this, patients should monitor any reactions to any new or existing drugs.
  4. There are many user friendly, free mobile apps that keep track of a patient’s regimen – alerting them to potential dangerous interactions. ScriptSave WellRx has a new “Virtual Medicine Cabinet” that warns patients of hazardous drug interactions. It also sends reminders when patients need to take their next pill, or need a refill.

Read the full story on living50better.com.

 

————–Addendum (13 Mar, 2019)————–

…and check out what Dr Max Gomez had to say on CBS News, including an interview with ScriptSave’s Dr Dan Johnson.

 

 


Human score    Trustpilot Stars    number of reviews    Trustpilot Logo

If you’re struggling to afford your medications,
visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you.
You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!

0 views

does tamiflu help - scriptsave wellrx blog post image

by Terra Leon, PharmD Candidate 2019

Tamiflu (oseltamivir) is a prescription medication used in the treatment of influenza in patients 2 weeks and older. It can also be indicated as prophylaxis treatment from the flu and reduce the chances of getting the flu in patients 1 year and older1.

tamiflu package-flu shot image - scriptsave wellrx blog

How does Tamiflu work?

Tamiflu (oseltamivir) is a prodrug, meaning that the drug is metabolized into the active drug after it is administered. Prodrugs are beneficial when the active drug itself has low availability in circulation and is not absorbed well in the stomach. Prodrugs are designed to not only increase the amount active drug in circulation, improve elimination but they also can reduce adverse effects or unintended side effects. Once Tamiflu is metabolized into the active drug, the active drug blocks replication of the virus in the body3. Tamiflu stops the replication process of the influenza virus in your body, it does not cure you of the flu rather it shortens the duration of flu like symptoms in the body by about 1-2 days.

Can everyone use Tamiflu?

Tamiflu (oseltamivir) is recommended in patients for treatment of influenza who are 2 weeks and older and is to be initiated within 48 hours of influenza symptom onset2. Tamiflu may also be prescribed for patients who were exposed to a confirmed flu diagnosis within 48 hours of close contact with the infected individual2. Patients who use Tamiflu >48 hours of symptom onset or exposure may still benefit from the medication, specifically children4. A study was done in children indicating that if Tamiflu was administered within 5 days of symptom onset that overall flu symptoms were reduced by 1 day when compared to placebo4.

Tamiflu side effects

The main side effects patients experience while using Tamiflu are headache, nausea and vomiting3. Please seek medical attention if you have any serious skin and hypersensitivity reaction.

Misconceptions about Tamiflu

Tamiflu will cure me of the flu

Most patients have the misconception that Tamiflu will cure them of the flu, when in reality the medication works by reducing the number of days with flu like symptoms. There is not direct cure for the flu since it is a viral entity, like the common cold. All we can do is treat our symptoms to ease the burden of the virus on the body. The most effective way to protect yourself from the flu is to receive your flu vaccination annually.

Tamiflu is a replacement for the flu shot

Tamiflu or any antiviral medication is not a replacement treatment for the flu vaccine itself. Receiving the flu vaccine is the primary defense to protect yourself from the flu. Antiviral medications are second line when the flu vaccine is not available or contraindicated for the individual4. Most insurance companies will cover the flu vaccine at little to no cost at all where Tamiflu (oseltamivir) can cost anywhere from $50-$135 depending on insurance and quantity needed5. That being said, receiving the flu vaccine protects you from the unwanted flu symptoms as well as the unwanted cost of medication, doctor office visits, and valuable time off work and school.

When I take Tamiflu I cannot get sick

There is no evidence that Tamiflu has any effect on any other illness in the body that does not contain influenza viruses, including bacterial infections. Some bacterial infections can initially present as influenza, it is important to be tested for influenza before starting Tamiflu as the sole treatment2. Always follow up with your doctor if you suspect a secondary bacterial infection in order to be treated appropriately.

Resources:

  1. “Fever, aches, chills. Check your symptoms and learn more about a prescription flu treatment.” Tamiflu.havaswwsfdev.com. 2019. 15 Jan. 2019 <https://www.tamiflu.com/>.
  2. Tamiflu Prescribing Information. 2018. 15 Jan. 2019 <https://www.gene.com/download/pdf/tamiflu_prescribing.pdf>.
  3. “Tamiflu (oseltamivir).” Facts & Comparisons. 15 Jan. 2019 <https://fco.factsandcomparisons.com/lco/action/search?q=tamiflu&t=name&va=>.
  4. “Influenza (Flu).” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 22 Nov. 2013. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 15 Jan. 2019 <https://www.cdc.gov/flu/news/flu-antiviral-benefits.htm>.
  5. “Tamiflu (oseltamivir).” ScriptSave Wellrx.  Feb 2019 https://www.wellrx.com/prescriptions/tamiflu/

0 views

alternatives toSudafed for HBP patients - allergy image - scriptsave wellrx

by Katie Tam
PharmD Candidate Class of 2019, University of Arizona

It’s allergy season and you can’t breathe the fresh air because your nose is congested and stuffed. You visit the pharmacy and purchase a box of Sudafed. Your pharmacist asks if you have a history of high blood pressure, and you answer “yes.” The pharmacist replies that she does not recommend Sudafed for you, but why?

What you need to know about Pseudoephedrine:

Brands of common over-the counter decongestants that contain pseudoephedrine: Allegra-D, Alka Seltzer Plus Cold Medicine Liqui-Gels, Aleve Cold and Sinus Caplets, Benadryl Allergy and Sinus Tablets, Claritin-D Non-Drowsy 24 Hour Tablets, Robitussin Cold Severe Congestion Capsules, Sudafed 24 Hour Tablets, SudoGest, Wal-phed 12 hour, Suphedrine.2

Indications: nasal congestion, sinus congestion, and Eustachian tube congestion

Adverse side effects of pseudoephedrine:

  • Common: insomnia, nervousness, excitability, dizziness, and anxiety
  • Infrequent: tachycardia (rapid heart beat) or palpitations
  • Rare: dilated pupils, hallucinations, arrythmias (irregular heartbeat), high blood pressure, seizures, inflammation of the large intestine, and severe skin reactions

Contraindications for pseudoephedrine:

  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Severe or uncontrolled high blood pressure
  • Severe coronary artery disease
  • Prostatic hypertrophy
  • Hyperthyroidism
  • Closed angle glaucoma
  • Pregnant women

Pseudoephedrine and High Blood Pressure Interaction

In 2005, a study showed that pseudoephedrine increased systolic blood pressure and heart rate, but had no effect on diastolic blood pressure.1 They also found that higher doses and immediate-release formulations of pseudoephedrine were associated with higher blood pressures.1 In addition, the study revealed that patients with well controlled hypertension had higher systolic and diastolic blood pressures after taking immediate release pseudoephedrine formulations.1

What are safe alternatives to pseudoephedrine in patients with high blood pressure?

There are a few safe and effective alternatives to pseudoephedrine in patients with high blood pressure that can relieve nasal or sinus congestion symptoms. Placing a humidifier in the bedroom keeps moisture in the air, which helps prevent your nasal passages from drying out. Humidifiers can also help break up mucus and soothe inflamed nasal passageways.3 In addition, propping your head up on 2 pillows may help the mucus flow out of your nose and relieve some congestion. Saline sprays are also another safe option that can loosen congestion and improve drainage.3 If a patient with high blood pressure insists on taking a medication that includes pseudoephedrine, their pharmacist or physician will recommend the patient to monitor their blood pressure and take a sustained-release formulation to reduce the risk of increasing blood pressure.3

Next time you have sinus or nasal congestion, ask your physician before using pseudoephedrine if you have high blood pressure. Your local pharmacist can also help manage nasal congestion symptoms, provide valuable information regarding safer alternatives, and ensure optimal drug selection in patients with high blood pressure.

Resources:

  1. Salerno SM, Jackson JL, Berbano EP. Effect of Oral Pseudoephedrine on Blood Pressure and Heart Rate: A Meta-analysis. Arch Intern Med. 2005;165(15):1686–1694. doi:10.1001/archinte.165.15.1686.
  2. Radack  KDeck  CC Are oral decongestants safe in hypertension? an evaluation of the evidence and a framework for assessing clinical trials.  Ann Allergy 1986;56396- 401.
  3. High Blood Pressure and Cold Remedies: Which Are Safe? Mayo Clinic.  https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-pressure/expert-answers/high-blood-pressure/faq-20058281. Published January 09, 2019. Accessed January 20, 2019.

 

0 views

shingrix on backorder - scriptsave wellrx blog image

by Katy Winkel, PharmD Candidate Class of 2019
University of Kansas School of Pharmacy

Shingrix was approved in October 2017, nearly 10 years after Shingles Zostavax came to market. Shingrix is an inactivated, 2-dose series that anyone 50 years or older is eligible to receive. With the 2-dose series you will receive the first vaccine, then 2 to 6 months later you’ll receive the second vaccine. The Shingrix series is proven to be up to 90% effective unlike Shingles Zostavax, which is only 51% effective.

Shingrix is given intramuscularly, which means it will be given in your upper arm muscle much like where the flu vaccine is given. The most common side effects from Shingrix are pain, redness, and swelling at the injection site. Also, flu-like symptoms following the vaccine are common such as muscle pain, tiredness, fever, and upset stomach.1

The pharmacy tells me it’s on “backorder.” What does that mean?

The term “backorder” in terms of pharmacy simply means that the pharmacy went to place an order on a specific item and the wholesaler, or company that sells the item, cannot fulfill the order due to shortages. The manufacturer producing Shingrix is now experiencing shipping delays for their vaccine due to the high levels of demand putting it on “backorder.”3 Unfortunately, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is unsure of the exact date when Shingrix will be available again, and they predict that the manufacturer will continue to only release small amounts through 2019.2

What if I’ve already received the first dose of Shingrix and I’m past the 6-month mark for the second vaccine?

Per the CDC, once the Shingrix vaccine becomes available again you will get the second dose and do not need to restart the series. If you have not received any of the Shingrix series, but are wanting immediate vaccination, the old vaccine, Shingles Zostavax, is still available for use per the CDC. You should wait a minimum of 8 weeks after getting Shingles Zostavax before you receive Shingrix.3

While you wait….

Many pharmacies have started a waiting list for the Shingrix vaccine and prioritize customers who have already had the first dose. Also, any time you are in your local pharmacy be sure and ask if there are any updates on the availability of Shingrix. Pharmacists are here to help!

 

References:

  1. “Healthcare Providers / Professionals.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 19 Nov. 2018, www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/clinical-resources/shortages.html.
  2. “Shingles Vaccine.” SHINGRIX, Apr. 2018, www.shingrix.com/index.html.
  3. “Vaccines and Preventable Diseases.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 20 Nov. 2018, www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/shingles/hcp/shingrix/faqs.html.

People love ScriptSave!

Trustpilot rating
Trustpilot Stars

Trustpilot Logo

0 views

activated charcoal image - scriptsave wellrx blog

by Terra Leon, PharmD Candidate 2019

With all the new diet and detoxification trends arising from celebrities and the media, it’s hard to know harmful from helpful. Activated charcoal has been portrayed as the new “magic bullet” for multiple health issues. Activated charcoal’s popularity is quickly spreading and turning up in supplements, juices, hangover remedies, face masks and even toothpaste. The media and celebrities promise it will reduce bloating, clear skin, whiten your teeth, and detox your organs for a healthier life. But does it work?

What is Activated Charcoal

Charcoal is a fine black powder made from bone char, coal, saw dust, olive pits, coconut shells or petroleum coke4. The charcoal becomes activated when it is heated at a high enough temperature the structure changes and provides a higher surface area for substances to bind to4. Activated charcoal’s oldest use is in medical practice in the Emergency Room as a treatment to detox patients who over dose on certain medications. When a patient over doses on a medication like Tylenol or Aspirin, activated charcoal is utilized to help trap toxins and gases in the gut. Since activated charcoal is not absorbed by the body it carries the toxins bound to its surface area out of your body through feces like a big drug sponge. Due to its highly negatively charged surface, activated charcoal attracts positively charged molecules for excretion, like toxins and gases but it can also have an effect on other medication and lead to lower absorption4.

Alternative Options

An alternative to activated charcoal to reduce gas and bloating, is to stick to a whole food plant-based diet, avoid products with artificial sweeteners, avoid carbonated drinks, and beer, which can release carbon dioxide gas, Also, be sure to eat and drink slowly1. Taking your time eating and drinking can help you swallow less air and reduce gas. Consult your health care provider for other alternative over-the-counter options, such as Gas-X, if natural options still don’t provide relief.

For clear skin try over the counter or prescription products that help reduce oils and clear bacteria on the skin surface. Make sure you wash your face every day and avoid high in oil foods to reduce surface oil1. Consult your healthcare professional if blemishes continue to arise.

If its whiter teeth you seek, try over the counter whitening kits that have hydrogen peroxide. Rinse your mouth after consuming coffee, soda or teas. Activated charcoal lacks published studies on being beneficial for teeth whitening. In fact, the fine black charcoal powder can potentially become embedded into cracks or small holes in the teeth producing the opposite effect1. Consult your dentist for alternative whitening procedures.

Not So Harmless?

Using activated charcoal supplement as a detoxification method is not as harmless as some may think.  Activated charcoal does not have the ability to suck out toxic chemicals from your body, its effects are limited to the GI tract3. Furthermore, it does not discriminate against helpful chemicals in food you consume and can remove beneficial nutrients such as Vitamin C, B6, Thiamine, Biotin and Niacin from the body3. In line with this, there are also concerns that activated charcoal can make medications less effective. In short, to “detox” or cleanse the body make sure to drink plenty of water each day and eat a high in fiber diet to help naturally remove waste from the body.

Medication Interactions

Activated charcoal can reduce the absorption and interrupt the circulation of certain medications and should only be used under the supervision of a health care professional2. If you are taking any prescription medication consult your doctor before using charcoal as a supplement or any other oral ingestible form. Due to its possibility of decreasing absorption of other medication it is recommended to take activated charcoal at least 1 hour before or 2 hours after taking other drugs if approved by your doctor2.

Bottom Line

With all the new health fads and trends offering a one supplement solve all solution or “magic bullet” it is easy to get sucked into the excitement of this new trend. When it comes to activated charcoal there are no strong studies supporting these benefits and weaker studies are not supported by science. Always consult your doctor or health care professional to gain all the information you need about a new product to determine if this product will be helpful or harmful to your personal health.

References:

  1. Calderone, Julia. “Activated Charcoal Isn’t a Magic Health Bullet.” Product Reviews and Ratings – Consumer Reports, Apr. 2017, consumerreports.org/dietary-supplements/activated-charcoal-fad-not-a-magic-health-bullet/.
  2. Charcoal Oral, Facts & Comparisons, 2018, https://fco.factsandcomparisons.com/lco/action/search?q=activated%2Bcharcoal&t=name&va=activated%2Bchar.
  3. Gavura, Scott. “Activated Charcoal: The Latest Detox Fad in an Obsessive Food Culture.” Science-Based Medicine, 28 Jan. 2016, sciencebasedmedicine.org/activated-charcoal-the-latest-detox-fad-in-an-obsessive-food-culture/. https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/activated-charcoal-the-latest-detox-fad-in-an-obsessive-food-culture/
  4. Petre, Alina. “What Is Activated Charcoal Good For? Benefits and Uses.” Healthline, Healthline Media, June 2017, www.healthline.com/nutrition/activated-charcoal#section10.

People love ScriptSave!

Trustpilot rating
Trustpilot Stars

Trustpilot Logo

0 views

searching online for health information - scriptsave wellrx - blog image

When it comes to health information on the internet, many patients are no longer sure what to believe. Just as important, patients often don’t know how to apply what they have read. Healthcare providers have the opportunity to help patients navigate through the vast variety of online health information.

Take the Practice Trends Today quiz (here) from the American Pharmacists Association (APhA) to learn more about helping patients understand the results of their online healthcare searches.

Click Here to take the quiz.


Download the free WellRx app from the iOS app store or the Google Play Store,
and get registered to take advantage of our free medication adherence tools.

If you’re struggling to afford your prescription medications,
visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you.
You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!

0 views

drug recalls - patient guide - scriptsave wellrx - blog image

by Jenny Bingham, PharmD, BCACP
SinfoníaRx

Have you ever experienced the unsettling feeling when you hear a drug recall announcement for a prescription that you take every day? The United States Food & Drug Administration (FDA) recalled over seven different products in December 2018 due to impurities, mislabeling, or performance defects. The FDA works closely with drug manufacturers to recall and remove any defective medications from the consumer market.  They also have laws that require organizations to contact patients subject to the recall.

If you do find yourself not knowing what next steps to take after a drug recall, here are some useful tips to guide you throughout the process.

Step 1: Resources for Recalled Medications

The FDA publicly shares a current listing of all recalled products on their website. If you receive a phone call, email, mailer, or any type of communication from your dispensing pharmacy and/or organization that administers your medication to you, you can use this website to learn more information about the recall and the reason for it.

Patients can also contact their dispensing pharmacy to confirm whether their medication was subject to the recall. Most pharmacies keep a digital log of the lot number, expiration date, and NDC. They can compare it to the FDA’s drug recall tracking information (as shown below), along with product photos on their website.

NDC Manufacturer Product
Description
Lot/Batch Expiration
Date

The FDA classifies drug recalls based on their severity. Class I Recalls pose a risk for serious health problems and death. Class II Recalls pose a risk of temporary or reversible health problems. Class III Recalls are not likely to cause an adverse health problem, but it violated FDA laws. Only your provider can determine what is the best course of action to take in response to the recall.

Step 2: Contact Your Provider

Whether your provider is an ambulatory care pharmacist, nurse practitioner, or a medical doctor, it is imperative that you contact them once you learn about your drug’s recall. Do not abruptly stop therapy without consulting your provider. Some medications pose severe risks if you suddenly stop taking them.

Your provider can work with you to develop a plan. Your pharmacy might be able to refill the medication from a different manufacturer that is not related to the recall. If they are not able to substitute with a different manufacturer, your provider will work with you to determine what is an appropriate alternative therapeutic regimen.

Step 3: Disposing of Your Medication

If your medication is recalled and your provider advises you to discontinue therapy and stop taking it, it is important to properly dispose of your medicine. The Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) announces National Prescription Drug Take-Back events on their website. The FDA also has a website that shares useful tips on how to safely dispose of medicine.

 

Resources:

https://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/DrugRecalls/default.htm

https://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/drug_disposal/takeback/index.html

https://www.fda.gov/drugs/resourcesforyou/consumers/buyingusingmedicinesafely/ensuringsafeuseofmedicine/safedisposalofmedicines/ucm186187.htm#1


It’s cold and flu season.

Need to save money on your
Tussionex or Azithromycin (Z-Pak)
prescription?
Visit www.WellRx.com to find the
lowest medication prices
at pharmacies near you!

 

0 views

Do ARBs cause cancer - scriptsave wellrx - blog image

by Mitchell Welton, PharmD Candidate 2019
University of Arizona

As with all cause and effect scenarios it is always best to cover the basics. Before we ask if ARBs cause cancer let’s discuss what an ARB actually is. An ARB is a family of medications taken by mouth to lower blood pressure. The acronym stands for angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) and its name implies its function. This medication blocks angiotensin II from binding to its respective receptor. When angiotensin II binds to its receptor it causes the blood vessel to contract which increases the blood pressure.1 A patient taking an ARB would have less binding of the receptor and thus no contraction of the blood vessels causing lower blood pressure. Aside from its intended purpose, do ARBs also cause cancer?

Evaluation of Cancer Risk

In 2016 an analysis was done to evaluate the incidence of cancer in patients treated with ARBs for high blood pressure. The review concluded that ARBs had no effect in the incidence of cancer which was consistent with the findings of a similar study conducted in 2011.2 In other words, to say that ARBs as a drug class cause cancer would not be correct. However, in June of 2018 Valsartan, a commonly prescribed ARB, was recalled by the manufacturer citing an impurity found in the medication. The impurity, N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), is a probable cancer-causing agent.

Since then the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) launched an investigation into the affected Valsartan products. That investigation found a second impurity known as N-Nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) also a probable human carcinogen. Further investigation and testing on other ARBs revealed that some irbesartan and losartan products contained NDEA as well. All affected products have been recalled. Not all ARBs are affected by this recall, however a list of all affected products can be found on the FDA website. It is also important to note that the drugs candesartan, eprosartan, olmesartan, and telmisartan belong to the ARB drug class and have not been identified as containing either of the previously mentioned impurities.3

The Impact of Impurities

The effect that these impurities have on cancer rates is difficult to assign a number to. Professionals at the FDA estimate that there would be one additional case of cancer out of 8,000 people taking valsartan contaminated by NDMA.3 This estimate assumes the patient was taking the highest daily valsartan dose of 320 mg over a period of 4 years. Prescribed dosages of valsartan range from 40 mg to 320 mg daily and lower strength tablets would contain less NDMA respectively than a higher strength tablet.3 This estimate also assumes that every tablet taken over the four-year period contained NDMA. Not all batches affected by the recall actually contained the impurities and over a four year period of refilling the prescription it is unlikely that a patient was exposed to the amount of NDMA calculated in the 1 in 8,000 risk.

With that being said, even if the risk of getting cancer is smaller than 1 in 8,000 it doesn’t take into account the emotional toll this recall can have on a patient that has taken a potentially affected blood pressure medication. NDEA was discovered after NDMA and the FDA does not yet have a risk estimate for the later impurity but will update the information as soon as it becomes available.3

What Should You Do?

If you or someone you know is taking an ARB for the treatment of high blood pressure, check the FDA website regularly. A list of affected medication with their lot and expiration dates can be found for all valsartan, irbesartan, and losartan included in the recall. Again, not all ARBs are affected, and if you are unsure how to match the lot and expiration dates on the medication you picked up from the pharmacy, call and talk to your pharmacist. If you are taking a medication affected in the recall, your pharmacist may be able to recommend or provide you with an unaffected medication by a different manufacturer. The FDA recommends you take your current medication as prescribed until you can get a replacement from your pharmacist or doctor.3

 

References

  1. Ogbru, O. (n.d.). Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers (ARBs) Drug Facts, Side Effects and Dosing. Retrieved from https://www.medicinenet.com/angiotensin_ii_receptor_blockers/article.htm
  2. Zhao, Y., Li, P., Zhang, J., Wang, L. and Yi, Z. (2018). Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers and Cancer Risk. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4863811/
  3. Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. (n.d.). Drug Safety and Availability – Questions and Answers: Impurities found in certain generic angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) products. Retrieved from https://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/ucm626122.htm

 


For the best Rx price on
prescription medications,
visit www.WellRx.com.
Compare prices at more than
62,000 pharmacies nationwide.

0 views

best-statin-prices - scriptsave wellrx - blog image

by Jenny Bingham, PharmD, BCACP; Heather Lee, PharmD Candidate; Mitchell Welton, PharmD Candidate

In such a competitive cholesterol medication market, manufacturers have been forced to make drastic cuts to their medication costs. Amgen lowered its product by 60%, followed by a 45-70% reduction from Regeneron. The price reductions occurred in response to the national consumer’s options to trial a multitude of more affordable options for cholesterol management, based on their clinical goals.

To better understand each product, a comparison should be made between each medication’s indication, effectiveness, and price.

Praluent

Praluent is an adjunct for patients who have uncontrolled cholesterol levels despite the presence of high intensity statin therapy.1 It is indicated for patients with atherosclerosic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) who would benefit from an additional reduction of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Praluent has been reported to reduce cholesterol levels by >=40% of patients who taking a maximally tolerated dose of statin.2 It was also reported to be effective at reducing cardiovascular outcomes and all-cause death by 15% in patients who have acute coronary syndrome.3 The primary patient population that would obtain the most benefit from Praluent are patients who have high LDL cholesterol levels.3 A recent price reduction by Regeneron and Sanofi occurred in May 2018. The price decreased from $14,600/year to a range of $4,500 to $8,000/year via rebate.4

Repatha

Repatha is indicated for the treatment of hyperlipidemia and has been reported to reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke.6 Evidence demonstrates the potential for plaque reduction if used with statin therapy. Amgen recently followed suit with lowering the price of Repatha after competitors Regeneron and Sanofi lowered the price of their competing product as mentioned above. Prior to the lowered cost in October the annual price of Repatha was $14,100/year. Amgen initially offered a prescription savings card for eligible patients, however patients with federal, state, or government-funded healthcare insurance were excluded. The new cost is $5,850/year, a nearly 60% decrease in cost. Amgen recently announced new opportunities for Medicare patients to benefit from therapy as the result of the price cut. 7

What to Ask Your Provider and/or Pharmacist

With the new, more affordable prices, you might be curious if these medications are best for your cholesterol management and cardiovascular health. It’s important to maintain routine appointments with your provider to ensure your cholesterol levels are monitored appropriately. Based upon your lab results and medication history, your provider and/or pharmacist may deem it appropriate to trial one of the above noted medications. However, it’s also important to adhere to provider recommendations about lifestyle changes, like diet and exercise.

References:

  1. Accessdata.fda.gov: https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2015/125559Orig1s000lbledt.pdf. Published 2018. (accessed 29 Nov 2018)
  2. Alirocumab (Praluent) to Lower LDL-Cholesterol. JAMA. 2015;314(12):1284. doi:10.1001/jama.2015.11372
  3. American College of Cardiology: https://www.acc.org/latest-in-cardiology/articles/2018/03/05/15/53/sat-9am-odyssey-outcomes-cv-outcomes-with-alirocumab-after-acs-acc-2018 (accessed 29 Nov 2018)
  4. CNBC. https://www.cnbc.com/2018/05/01/regeneron-sanofi-chop-cholesterol-drug-price-in-express-scripts-pact.html. Published 2018. (accessed 29 Nov 2018)
  5. Repatha (Evolocumab Injection, for Subcutaneous Injection): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses. (n.d.): https://www.rxlist.com/repatha-drug.htm#indications.
  6. CBS News: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/drug-repatha-with-a-statin-could-help-reverse-heart-disease/ (accessed 4 Dec 2018)
  7. CNBC: https://www.cnbc.com/2018/10/24/amgen-cuts-price-of-cholesterol-drug-by-almost-60percent.html (accessed 4 Dec 2018).

For the best Rx price on
Crestor (rosuvastatin), Zocor (simvastatin), Lipitor (atorvastatin) and other statins,
visit www.WellRx.com.

Compare prices at more than
62,000 pharmacies nationwide.

0 views