Ask a Pharmacist

What You Need to Know about Morning Sickness

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By Pawel F. Kojs, PharmD Candidate Class of 2019,
University of Arizona College of Pharmacy

Morning sickness or nausea and vomiting in pregnancy (NVP) occurs in 70-80% of pregnant women.  In the United States, roughly 4 million women are affected each year.  This is more common in women that live in Western countries.1 A small percentage of women are affected each year with the more extreme form of morning sickness called hyperemesis gravidarum (HG).1

To help with this condition, there are many remedies to consider with your provider.

How can diet help with morning sickness?

With respect to diet, it is best to avoid large meals and eat smaller meals more often throughout the day.  Eating more protein and less fat is advised as well.2

Even though it’s difficult, eating foods that do not have a high flavor profile and ones that are low in fat helps reduce the time it takes for food to leave the stomach.  This in turn helps with reducing the amount of symptoms one would have with morning sickness.2

Which options can help me with morning Sickness?

There are different options to help treat morning sickness. Avoid smells, foods, tastes, and smells that trigger that nauseous feeling. Talk to your healthcare provider before taking any new prescription or over-the-counter (OTC) medications, and nutritional/herbal supplements.

Prescription Options

Disclaimer: Always consult with your provider before taking any medication during pregnancy.

OTC Options

These options for pregnancy related nausea and vomiting are commonly used. The types of medications are available at your neighborhood pharmacy, but it is recommended to monitor for drowsiness or sedation.

Disclaimer: Always consult with your provider before taking any medication during pregnancy.

Prenatal Supplements

It is advisable to talk to a doctor regarding getting a proper prenatal supplementation. You and your provider can discuss how much folic acid you should take. US Department of Health & Human Services Office of Women’s Health (DHHS) recommends taking at least 400 – 800 micrograms of folic acid daily, starting at least three months before conception.3 Prenatal supplements should be taken on an empty stomach. If you experience stomach upset, try taking it before bed with a light snack.

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