Always ask the cash price - you could save on your prescriptions

The “he said/she said” of Rx pricing tools

If you’ve ever used a prescription price-check tool for an Rx savings program (like ScriptSave WellRx), only to have been told a different price when the time came to collect & pay for the prescription at the pharmacy, then the next few paragraphs are for you.

Regardless of the product or service, it’s an infuriating thing to be quoted one price online, but to then be confronted with a different reality at the store (unless, of course, the price comes down – then we love it).

What can be done to avoid bad price-quotes?

For patients using prescription savings programs, there are a few steps that can be taken to help reduce the potential for errors with an Rx price-check tool.

In short, there are some very important things to keep in mind when doing a price look-up with a prescription discount card and overlooking any single one of them has the potential to make a mess of things.

In no particular order, at ScriptSave WellRx we always recommend that our members keep the following pointers in mind:

    • Potential Problem #1
      Prescription prices can be volatile and it’s not uncommon to find regular (even daily) price changes across pharmacies in any given zip code.
    • Recommendation
      When using a price-check tool or mobile app to review the lowest prescription prices in your zip code, be sure to perform one final look-up on the same day that you end up collecting & paying for your script. As frustrating as it might be to discover that prices changed for your medication overnight, it’s far less frustrating to realize this before you leave home. Especially if you also discover that the same medication actually came down in price at a different pharmacy nearby (perhaps even giving you the opportunity to make arrangements to transfer the prescription).

     

    • Potential Problem #2
      Prescription medications come in many different strengths, forms, quantities, etc. There’s also the matter of brands & generics. However, a price-check tool for a prescriptions savings card like ScriptSave WellRx has to start somewhere – and the default settings on the website will generally only return pricing results for one very specific version of each medication. For example, perhaps the price-check tool will show results for the most commonly filled strength, quantity, form and manufacturer of the medication that you’re searching for.
    • Recommendation
      When the results of your price-check are returned by the website or mobile app, ALWAYS take a few minutes to review the details against the details on your prescription … and make the necessary manual changes (if any are needed) using the drop-down menus that determine the drug’s Strength, Quantity, Form, Brand/Generic, etc. (see Fig.1)

     

    FIGURE 1
    ask cash price filter - results image

    • Potential Problem #3
      Your pharmacist does not recognize or is not familiar with your prescription savings card.
    • Recommendation
      If you’re using the ScriptSave WellRx card or mobile app, you can be confident that if your pharmacy showed up in our price-check tool, it’s more than likely that we have a contract with them to accept your savings card. We do our best to keep our database up-to-date so as not to send members on a wild goose chase. Perhaps the best way to approach using a ScriptSave WellRx card is to do so with confidence. Although this program is NOT insurance, an Rx savings card includes the same pharmacy processing information that pharmacists see & use every day on all the different insurance cards they deal with. That being case, simply hand your ScriptSave WellRx card to the pharmacist, point to where the card shows the Rx BIN, Rx PCN, etc. and ask,

    “Would you please process my prescription using these details and let me know what my out-of-pocket cost will be?”

    U.S. Based Call Center Support

    Another useful hint to keep in mind is that all ScriptSave WellRx members are serviced by a toll-free customer support number (staffed by real people right here in the U.S.). If you ever have a problem, you can call the support line toll-free at 1-800-407-8156, Monday through Friday, from 9am to 8pm EST, and our friendly staff will be glad to help get to the bottom of any issues. Given the real-time need that many patients face with filling their prescriptions, if you’ve had issues at a particular pharmacy in the past, it might be helpful to call our support staff ahead of your next visit to fill your prescription. If necessary, our staff may be able to call your pharmacy on your behalf – ahead of your visit – so that everything is smoothed out before you arrive to pick-up and pay.

    Final Thought – Love your Pharmacist (and Always Ask the Cash Price)

    Please always keep in mind that pharmacists have a LOT going on and they can be incredibly busy. Although they can make it look simple at times, that’s generally a reflection of their professionalism & experience, and their role in a patient’s healthcare is not to be underestimated. Pharmacists are a truly valuable resource and they juggle a lot of different tasks. If you meet a pharmacist who looks at your prescription savings card and doesn’t immediately recognize it, don’t be surprised. We can’t expect every pharmacist, at every pharmacy, to recognize and remember every single savings card and insurance program that they have a contract with. More often than not, if you ask your pharmacist (politely) to try processing your prescription using the details on the card, they will be happy to give it a try. If that doesn’t work, and if you’re using a card from ScriptSave, you have a tollfree support number to call for assistance.

    As for “Always Ask the Cash Price” … that’s a must-do for patients who don’t want to over-pay (especially for those WITH prescription insurance). For more insights on this, read our blog post on why you should Always Ask the Cash Price.


    Download the free WellRx app from the iOS app store or the Google Play Store,
    and get registered to take advantage of our free medication adherence tools.

    If you’re struggling to afford your medications,
    visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you.
    You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!

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pill boxes medication adherence

If your doctor has prescribed a medication for you, you want to be sure you’re getting the most benefit from that drug. Medication adherence is important to get the most benefit from the medications used to treat your condition. The causes of non-adherence, when a patient either accidentally or knowingly does not take medications as prescribed, can be complex. Non-adherence is often the result of cost; patients who simply can’t afford their medications. However, good habits and a good understanding of the medication can also be a big part of adherence, and can help you stick to your medication schedule.

Medication Adherence

World Health Organization defined adherence as “the extent to which a person’s behavior – taking medication, following a diet, and/or executing lifestyle changes, corresponds with agreed recommendations from a health care provider.” The concept that healthcare professionals manage medical conditions is true only in case of hospitalized patients. The bottom line is, medications don’t work in patients who don’t take them, or don’t take them as prescribed.

In an outpatient setting, the healthcare professionals’ role is limited to providing products (medications and/or monitoring devices) and educational tools. Taking medications, on time and properly, is left up to the patient or their in-home caregiver. There are several techniques to help you remember to take your medications as prescribed and manage their own medical condition. As the patient, you have the ultimate control for safe and effective treatment.

Two Steps to Medication Adherence
Adherence to medication can be achieved in two simple steps; understanding and behavior changes. Understanding includes knowledge of your medical condition and how your prescribed medication can help to manage it. Here are a few helpful websites:

  1. http://www.patienteducationcenter.org/ – The health-related content on the website is provided by Harvard Medical School. Medical conditions are listed alphabetically from A to Z.
  2. https://medlineplus.gov/ – Produced by the National Library of Medicine, provides reliable information on medical conditions, drugs, herbs, and supplements.
  3. https://www.wellrx.com/ – ScriptSave® WellRx allows you to search for the lowest prices on prescription medications at nearby pharmacies, and provides overviews of the medications. Our Ask a Pharmacist phone line lets you talk to a pharmacist about prescription medicines, dosing, or medication interaction questions. Registered members have access to a free suite of personal wellness tools in the Medicine Chest, including:
  • Ask a Pharmacist
  • Pill Reminders
  • Refill Reminders
  • Medication Information (in both English and Spanish)
  • Medication Videos
  • Mood-tracking (to review side effects, etc.)
  • Price-check and Pharmacy Locator

Behavioral changes mean finding ways to stay on track with your medication schedule. Finding the right tool or a combination of methods that fit best your lifestyle is key to medication adherence. Here are some ways to stay on track:

  1. Integrate your medication to your daily routine, such as brushing your teeth or watching your favorite TV show.
  2. Set one/multiple daily alarm using a clock, mobile phone, or computer.
  3. Ask a family member and/or friend give you a call remainder.
  4. Pill boxes are another way to organize your scheduled medications. Pill boxes are available in different forms that allow you/your caregiver to fill them daily, weekly, or even monthly.
  5. Medication charts can be developed by own or with the help of a healthcare professional. Keep an updated chart with medication names, dose, when you take them, and what are you taking them for. You can refer to the chart if you get confused with your medications.
  6. Plan ahead for medication refills and mark a calendar to make sure you always have your medication when necessary.
  7. If you have a smart phone, the free ScriptSave WellRx app can be used to remind you to take your medications, refill your medications, and track how the medications make you feel.

We hope these tips on medication adherence have helped. Download our free app from the iOS app store or the Google Play Store, and get registered to take advantage of our free medication adherence tools. If you’re struggling to afford your medications, visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you. You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!


For the best Rx price on
prescription medications,
visit www.WellRx.com.
Compare prices at more than
62,000 pharmacies nationwide.

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Zollinger-Ellison syndrome - stomach image

by Derek Matlock, PharmD

What is Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome?

Do you suffer from Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES)? If so, you may be in rare company. According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome is a rare disorder. It occurs in about one in every 1 million people. Normally, when we eat, our body releases a hormone called gastrin, which tells your stomach to make acid to help break down foods and liquids. For patients with ZES, this mechanism is disrupted by tumors or “gastrinomas.” These tumors form in the pancreas or upper small intestine and secrete abnormally large amounts of gastrin from tumors, resulting in peptic ulcers to be formed.

It Might Be Your Genes

Some people with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome may go undiagnosed as the disorder is rare and its cause is not clear. In 75% of cases, ZES is sporadic or random, whereas in 25% it is associated with MEN 1, an inherited condition characterized by pancreatic endocrine tumors, pituitary tumors, and hyperparathyroidism.  Therefore, your doctor may perform a thorough medical and family history to help diagnose ZES. Additional tests may include endoscopy or various imaging and blood tests. They may even measure the amount of acid in your stomach. For patients with sporadic ZES, the most common symptom is abdominal pain. While patients with the inherited form of ZES mostly complain of diarrhea. Other symptoms include, heartburn, nausea, vomiting, stomach bleeding, and weight loss.

Managing Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome

Currently, the goal of managing ZES is to limit complications of the disorder by suppressing acid secretions. Thus, the main medications used in ZES are proton pump inhibitors, or PPIs, like omeprazole (Prilosec®) or pantoprazole (Protonix®), prescribed at high doses. For patients who do not respond to treatment with PPIs, octreotide is used, which stops the secretion of gastrin, the hormone that tells our body to secrete acid for food breakdown. Currently, the only cure for ZES is surgical removal of the tumor or tumors, but this may not be an option in cases where the tumors have spread to other parts of the body. In that case, chemotherapy with medications like streptozotocin, 5-fluorouracil, and doxorubicin are used to shrink tumors.

Zollinger-Ellison syndrome is a rare disorder that may be suspected in patients with multiple or repeat peptic ulcers. Currently, medications like proton pump inhibitors are the main treatment option, while surgery and chemotherapy are options in certain patients. Remember, when taking proton pump inhibitors, they are best taken 30-60 minutes before a meal and may also come with their own unfavorable side effects. Be sure to talk to your doctor or pharmacist about what can be done to best optimize your treatment options for ZES.

Resources:

  1. Medscape: Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome
  2. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome
  3. UpToDate: Management and Prognosis of the Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome

For the best prescription savings
on medications,
visit www.WellRx.com.
Compare prices at more than
62,000 pharmacies nationwide.

 

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transitions of care home health image

“It all started with pain radiating down my left arm. It was hard to breathe and I was short of breath. I knew something was wrong and called 911. I was rushed to the hospital. I remember the sirens, but they slowly faded away. Then I woke up. There was a man in a white coat telling me that I’d had a heart attack. He handed me some medicine bottles and prescriptions. Before you know it, I was discharged and on my way home.”

This was how Nancy described her heart attack. After several days in the hospital,  Nancy was discharged home, and now has to take four new medications every day. That can add up to a lot of out-of-pocket expense.

This scenario happens all too often, and through an unfortunate set of events, Nancy was re-admitted into the hospital just three weeks later.

Moving Through the Healthcare System

Transition of Care (TOC) is the movement of a patient from one setting of care (hospital, ambulatory primary care practice, ambulatory specialty care practice, long-term care, home health, rehabilitation facility) to another.1 This definition by The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) describes the process of a patient navigating the health care system and the unfortunate, but common reality that gaps in care develop between the hospital and outpatient setting.

A Growing Healthcare Need

This area of healthcare is expanding and becoming more important to help reduce readmission rates and the cost of healthcare. Pharmacists are expanding their roles by providing TOC services to patients newly diagnosed with specific conditions and/or a flare-up of a chronic condition or disease. Quite often will a patient’s medication therapy change upon admittance to a hospital and then at discharge from the hospital. They may be prescribed new medications after a hospital stay. The goal is to ensure the continuity of care for patient and help fill the gap, by:

  • Providing education about a condition
  • Monitoring a condition
  • Helping patients understand their medication.

Why Transition of Care Matters

Helping patients understand their prescription medications allows them to get the most benefit from them, and, to understand why it is important to take their medications as prescribed. Helping patients save on prescription medication costs is what ScriptSave WellRx does.

It is not just pharmacists that are expanding into this role, but other health care professionals like nurses, doctors, and case managers, too. It takes a care team effort and patient-centric approach to ensure that each patient is getting the best, high-quality care available.

 

References:

https://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Legislation/EHRIncentivePrograms/downloads/8_Transition_of_Care_Summary.pdf


For the best Rx price on statins and other medications,
visit www.WellRx.com.

Compare prices at more than
62,000 pharmacies nationwide.

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prescription savings pill-splitting - wellrx

by Hayde Blanco, PharmD Candidate
University of Arizona College of Pharmacy

Pill splitting refers to breaking a pill down to obtain a smaller amount of the whole pill. Your doctor can write a prescription that is usually double the dosage of what you should take in one day. You can then cut the pill in half, making the smaller dose that should actually be taken. For instance, a medication might be prescribed for 40 mg, but then the pill is split so you actually end up taking 20 mg.

Why Split Pills?

Pill splitting can be a huge help in cost savings if the same amount of the larger and smaller doses are sold at a similar price. Some of the most common reasons for pill splitting are:

  • Reduce the costs associated with a medication
  • Take a dosage of a drug that is not already available.

These methods can be useful to help some people save on their prescription medications, but are not suitable for everyone or for every type of pill. There are some risk factors that should be taken into consideration before splitting any pills.

Pill Splitting Concerns

When a pill is split, there may be different amounts in each half of the pill. Since the active ingredient in each pill is not usually evenly distributed throughout the pill, this may lead to one half containing more of the active ingredient than the other, giving it more potency. Some pills may be hard to split due to having an unusual shape, being too hard, or crumbling easily. There are also some medications that should never be split.

Pharmaceutical companies create some pills that are scored, meaning that they have a line down the middle to make it easier to split.

pill splitting sertaline
This pill is generic sertraline 100mg (an antidepressant) with a line down the middle. Generic pricing for 30 tablets of 100mg averages about $11.50. Generic pricing for 30 tablets of 50mg averages about $10.00. By cutting the 100mg dose in half, you would save close to half of the cost.

Some of the risk of pill splitting is related to the individual, instead of being related to the pill. A common issue is forgetting to split a pill, which could lead to taking double the amount of the prescribed dose. The directions might also be unclear if the bottle says to take one daily, but your doctor says to take one-half daily. You should always verify with your doctor if you are not sure about the prescription dosage you should be taking.

​Although there are risks involved with pill spitting, it can be an appropriate cost saving technique for some people. If pills are being split, there are some recommendations that should be followed to reduce the risks.

What are the Risks?

Some of the risk can be related to the individual instead of being related to the pill. A common issue is forgetting to split a pill, which could lead to taking twice or more of the needed dose. The directions might also be unclear if the bottle says to take one daily, but your doctor says to take one-half daily. Always verify with your doctor if you are not sure how much you should be taking.

​Although there are risks involved with pill spitting it can be an appropriate cost saving technique for some people. If pills are being split, there are some recommendations that should be followed to reduce the risks.

Splitting Pills Safely

  1. Always discuss your choices with a pharmacist or doctor before deciding to split a pill.
  2. Have a general understanding of which pills are appropriate to split and which are not.
  3. Use an appropriate pill cutter. Using a pill cutter instead of a knife or other object cuts the pill more evenly and leads to better distribution of the active ingredient.
  4. Cut the pills right before taking them instead of cutting them all at the same time. Since the distribution of the active ingredient is often not the same on both sides, taking both halves on consecutive days allows for a more even intake of the active ingredient. Additionally, a medication might not be as effective at treating your symptoms when it is broken down and exposed to air and moisture over time.
  5. Make sure you are can put this into practice safely or have someone help you if you can’t. If you have any problems with memory, trouble using your hands, or do not think you would be able to split the pills on an ongoing basis this will not be an appropriate technique to use.

These medications are usually appropriate to split, but always check with your pharmacist or doctor if it is okay to split your medication:

  • High blood pressure medications
  • High cholesterol medications (statins, like Lipitor, Crestor, or Zocor)
  • Depression medications.

These pills should not be split:

  • Capsules
  • Enteric-coated medications
  • Extended release or long acting medications
  • Combination pills containing more than one drug
  • Prepackaged pills, like birth control
  • Certain classes of medications, such as chemotherapy drugs
  • Pills with a small therapeutic index (these pills need to be taken at a very precise dose because they can lead to side effects more easily if more than the prescribed dose is taken or they might not be as effective if too little is taken).

Always remember to talk to your healthcare provider to be sure it’s appropriate for you to split a certain pill before using this cost saving technique. When done correctly, pill splitting can be a safe and effective method to reduce prescription medication costs.

 

References:

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/tablet-splitting-risky-practice-stuart-silverman

http://www.consumerreports.org/drugs/is-it-safe-to-split-pills-in-half/

http://www.consumerreports.org/drugs/get-the-right-pill-splitter-and-save-money-on-your-medication/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2827917/


For the best Rx price on statins and other medications,
visit www.WellRx.com.

Compare prices at more than
62,000 pharmacies nationwide.

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ScriptSave WellRx - Statins and Liver Damage

by: James Ketterer, PharmD Candidate
University of Arizona College of Pharmacy

If your doctor has said you have high cholesterol, it’s likely that you’ve heard or read about about the potential side effects of statin drugs and their impact on liver.

Doctors often prescribe statins for people with high cholesterol levels to lower their total cholesterol and reduce their risk of a heart attack or stroke. While statins are highly effective, they have been linked to muscle pain, digestive problems and mental fuzziness in some people and may rarely cause liver damage.

Cholesterol and triglycerides are lipids (fats) that are stored in the body and serve as a source of energy. Lipids, together with proteins and carbohydrates, are the main components of living cells. When lipid levels in the bloodstream are too high or low, this condition is called dyslipidemia. The most common types of dyslipidemia are:

  • High levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL or “bad”) cholesterol
  • Low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL or “good”) cholesterol
  • High levels of triglycerides

You may have heard stories of people who have experienced devastating liver damage from their use of drugs like atorvastatin (Lipitor), rosuvastatin (Crestor) and simvastatin (Zocor). Less than 3% of patients on statins report muscle pain while less than 0.5% report rhabdomyolysis (A breakdown of muscle tissue that releases a damaging protein into the blood).

Recently, the risk of statin-induced liver injury has become a hot topic, since this class of drugs is metabolized by enzymes in the liver. Liver injury has a broad definition, but generally includes, at minimum, highly elevated liver enzymes which are directly correlated with liver function and often a precursor to various liver diseases.

Statin Studies

While studies on the safety of these drugs have included thousands of patients, it’s difficult to determine if something like liver injury is one of the side effects of statin drugs, or happening for some other reason. Drug-induced side effects are more commonly identified after a drug hits the market and patients and physicians begin reporting problem cases to the drug manufacturers.

There have been a few studies around the world that have looked at drug-induced liver injury. A study in Iceland identified 96 patients with drug-induced liver injury. Three of those 96 were due to statins (1 with simvastatin and 2 with atorvastatin). During the trial, over 27,000 people were treated with simvastatin and over 7,000 with atorvastatin. That means that 1 out of 27,000 people on simvastatin and 1 out of 3,500 people on atorvastatin had drug-induced liver injury in Iceland over that 2 year period. Of all statins, simvastatin and atorvastatin are responsible for most reported incidents of liver damage, but this is likely just due to the fact that they are prescribed the most.

The Spanish Hepatotoxicity Registry identified 858 cases of drug-induce liver injury. Of those cases they attributed 47 (5.5%) of them to statin use. The total number of patients on statins was not available.

One of the latest studies from the USA ran from 2004 to 2014, examining drug-induced liver injury identified 1188 cases. They determined that about 2% could be contributed to statin use.

A Swedish study compared the reported statin-induced liver injuries to the total number of statin users (based on sales) and found that 1.2 people experience liver injury due to statins per 100,000 users of statins.

A Rare Occurrence

Outside of these large studies, there have been case reports of patients experiencing liver injury following an increase in dosage of their statins. These are few and far between, and are corrected by decreasing or discontinuing the medication. Some of these patients have been restarted on statins and experienced the same liver problems, confirming the drug as the cause. People that experience statin induced liver injury have a generally positive prognosis. These injuries are usually short-term and reversible. One study of interest that looked at 298 patients whom had experienced drug-induced liver injury and found that only 7 of them had any signs of liver problems one year later.

While there’s a lot of information on the safety of statins in the media, the truth is that side effects of statin drugs, including livery injury, are very rare. That’s not to say that they don’t occur, but rather that the benefits in patients with cardiovascular risk, even those with underlying liver problems, substantially outweigh the potential risks.

 

References

Björnsson, Einar S. “Hepatotoxicity Of Statins And Other Lipid-Lowering Agents”. Medscape. N.p., 2017. Web. 9 Mar. 2017.

Simvastatin.  Micromedex Solutions.  Truven Health Analytics, Inc. Ann Arbor, MI.  Available at: http://www.micromedexsolutions.com.  Accessed March 2, 2017.

 

Have questions? Ask a Pharmacist!

We want to make sure you have the information you need to safely
use your prescription drugs. Connect with a pharmacist at SinfoniaRx
who can help with non-emergency prescription questions
about drug interactions, and other medication-related questions.


For the best Rx price on statins,
visit www.WellRx.com.

Compare prices at more than
62,000 pharmacies nationwide.

generic aspirin tablets

by: Rick Lasica, BS
University of Arizona College of Pharmacy PharmD Candidate, Class of 2017

Many people take aspirin occasionally to provide relief from various conditions (e.g. pain, inflammation, fever, headaches), but what about taking a low-dose aspirin every day for prevention reasons? As with all medications, aspirin poses various benefits and risks that need to be taken into consideration before you start taking it. Studies have shown that certain individuals would benefit the most from taking a low-dose aspirin and others shouldn’t take it at all.

Why Take Low Dose Aspirin?

Our bodies make cells called platelets, which help stop us from bleeding uncontrollably. In order to stop this unnecessary bleeding, a blood clot is formed. In this case, the blood clot is beneficial, but sometimes blood clots are formed when they aren’t needed, which have the potential to lead to a heart attack or stroke. Aspirin is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) commonly referred to as a “blood thinner” because it stops platelets from working together to form a blood clot.

Even though aspirin has many potential benefits, it also has many side effects, some serious, that might occur. Most importantly, it can increase your risk of bleeding, both inside and outside of your body. This might be noticed through your gums bleeding while brushing your teeth, any unexplained bruising on your body, or black/tarry stools. Other side effects that might occur are ringing in the ears, nausea/vomiting, dizziness, or yellowing of the eyes/skin.

The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that people aged 50-59 years with an increased risk of heart problems who have never had a heart attack or stroke in the past would likely benefit from taking a daily low-dose aspirin in order to help reduce the chance of one from happening. Also, people who have had a heart attack or stroke are at an increased risk of having another one, and would likely benefit from it as well.

However, you should never start taking aspirin, or any medication, before talking with your physician or pharmacist about it. They will make an assessment of your condition and weigh the benefits and risks of you taking it and make the ultimate decision of whether or not you should take it as part of your daily regimen. Certain people should not take aspirin if they have had any serious bleeding events, are on certain medications, have a high fall risk, or have specific medical conditions. So, next time you interact with your doctor or pharmacist, ask them if they think it is appropriate for you to take a daily low-dose aspirin.

References:

  1. United States Preventive Services Task Force Recommendations on Aspirin Use to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease and Colorectal Cancer
  2. WebMD: Aspirin
  3. FDA: Safe Daily Use of Aspirin

 

Have questions? Ask a Pharmacist!

We want to make sure you have the information you need to safely
use your prescription drugs. Connect with a pharmacist at SinfoniaRx
who can help with non-emergency prescription questions
about drug interactions, and other medication-related questions.


For the best Rx price on medications,
www.WellRx.com.

Compare prescription drug prices at more than
62,000 pharmacies nationwide.

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ScriptSave WellRx diabetes check image

by:
Jeshvi Manhar, 2017 PharmD Candidate/ Sapna S. Patel, PharmD

ScriptSave WellRx - sound alike-look alike medications and diabetes imageSound-Alike/Look-Alike Medications are very important to identify and help reduce medication errors. There is a list of several medications starting with the letter “T” that have become available to treat diabetes. This may lead to confusion among patients and physicians, so it’s important YOU understand how to safely recognize and use your diabetes medication to minimize problems and possible complications.

Tradjenta® decreases the amount of sugar your liver makes and increases the amount of insulin your pancreas makes. This medicine is the easiest to differentiate, since it is an oral tablet taken once daily.

Tanzeum® and Trulicity® are in the same class of medications called GLP-1 Receptor Agonists. These medications are injected under the skin but, they are not the same as insulin! They decrease your blood sugar by releasing more insulin and slowing down your body’s digestion. The easiest way to differentiate these medications from insulin is that Tanzeum® and Trulicity® are injected under the skin once a week without regard to meals.

Now, let’s discuss the three medications that are insulin: Toujeo® U-300, Tresiba® U-100, and Tresiba® U-200. Insulin works by allowing blood sugar to move into the cells and be used as energy. Toujeo® and Tresiba® are considered long acting insulin and are injected under the skin once daily without regard to meals. These medications are not interchangeable! Toujeo® U-300 is the concentrated form of Lantus®. Toujeo® U-300 is 3 times the concentration of Lantus®! It would be easy to inject the wrong dose (especially when switching from one medication or concentration to another). Tresiba® U-200 is twice as concentrated as Tresiba® U-100! Toujeo® U-300, Tresiba® U-100, and Tresiba® U-200 are all packaged in green boxes, making them look alike. Before injecting your medication, take measures to ensure you know what the name and concentration of your medication is, what the box, pen and/or needle looks like, and how your medication should be used correctly. If in doubt, ask your pharmacist about the brand you’re buying and study the label before using the medication.

GENERAL INJECTION TIPS:

  1. Using 29 gauge 5mm pen needles for under the skin injection may cause less pain
  2. Roll the pen between the palm of your hands before use to decrease discomfort or pain
  3. Common injection sites are stomach and thigh
  4. Make sure to rotate injection sites to prevent buildup of fatty tissue and pain
  5. Wipe injection site with alcohol wipe then wait for a few seconds before injecting to reduce stinging
  6. Be sure to safely dispose and use a new needle prior to each injection to prevent infection.

 

Reference:

LexiComp®, 2.20.17, JM PharmD Candidate at OSU College of Pharmacy/SSP PharmD

Have questions? Ask a Pharmacist!

We want to make sure you have the information you need to safely use your prescription drugs. Connect with a pharmacist at SinfoniaRx who can help with non-emergency prescription questions about drug interactions, and other medication-related questions.


For the best Rx price on medications, like
Tradjenta,
Trulicity,
Lantus,

visit
www.WellRx.com.

Compare prices at more than
62,000 pharmacies nationwide.

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CBO analysis of Congress' Obamacare repeal or replace

It’s a hectic time for anyone trying to predict what will happen to their family’s healthcare costs. Every conceivable think tank, group, association and committee seems to have an opinion about the potential repeal of the Affordable Care Act (ACA, or Obamacare), and many ScriptSave WellRx members are wondering (and worrying) about who to believe.

One thing seems to be certain – change is coming. For some, it’ll be well received, while others may be worse for the change.

At ScriptSave, we keep close watch for signs of higher prescriptions prices. Anyone familiar with us, knows that our long-standing mission has been to close the gaps in prescription coverage. We have a 20-year history of working with health plans and pharmacies to provide consumers with discounts on their prescription medications. We choose not to make political statements, but we will insert ourselves into a discussion if we see opportunities to help inform our members.

After reading the much-anticipated Congressional Budget Office (CBO) analysis of the Republican Obamacare repeal bill, we wanted to summarize some important conclusions that, if you choose to believe the CBO, might be worth taking note of.

The CBO data suggest that roughly 24 million more people would be uninsured by 2026, under the new proposed plan. If the bill is enacted, 14 million more people would be uninsured in 2018 alone.

The nonpartisan CBO also forecasts the GOP plan would cut the deficit by $337 billion over a decade, primarily coming from funding cuts to Medicaid and private insurance subsidies.

An estimated 50 million people were uninsured when Obamacare was enacted in 2010, according to the National Health Interview Survey. This compares to a total of 52 million people who the CBO now estimates would be uninsured by 2026 if the new House bill became law.1

An analysis of the revised Senate amendment of the bill determined that the bill would result in 22 million fewer people with health insurance by 2026, and 15 million fewer just in the next year.5

An Increase on Premiums Through 2020

The CBO analysis of comparative projections, relative to the Affordable Care Act (ACA), shows how the Republicans’ Affordable Health Care Act would lead to higher average premiums in the individual market prior to 2020—15% in 2018 and 20% in 2019. The CBO made note that premium changes under the new proposal would differ “significantly” for people of different ages. In particular, the bill would allow insurance companies to charge older customers up to five times more for coverage similar to younger customers.2

Opposition from Healthcare Organizations

Independent of the CBO analysis, the American Hospital Association and the Federation of American Hospitals commissioned a study of the impact of the bill. Their findings led them to send a letter of opposition to Congress. Their study shows hospitals would be burdened with a loss of $165.8 billion in Medicaid reimbursements by 2026. They further noted “reversal of coverage would represent an unprecedented public health crisis” resulting from the loss of insurance coverage.3

Rising Prescription Drug Costs

The national association, America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP), also recently completed a study showing the majority of health insurance premiums are going towards the cost of prescription drugs.4

Regardless of how things shake out, ScriptSave will continue to do what we’ve done for the past 20 years—provide options to patients who struggle with non-covered and high deductible prescriptions. For those facing high out-of-pocket costs for prescription medications, a free download of the ScriptSave WellRx prescription savings card may help lower healthcare costs in this area. As a patient, the card (or mobile app) is free to download and free to use. The average savings rate for ScriptSave members is 45% (with many saving up to 80%*), and the ScriptSave WellRx program is contracted with over 62,000 pharmacies, nationwide.

For anyone wondering how it works, we just wrote a blog post on that subject. Learn more in our Honesty 1.01 article (and don’t forget to sign up, regardless of how you voted).


References:

1 https://www.cbo.gov/sites/default/files/115th-congress-2017-2018/costestimate/americanhealthcareact_0.pdf

2 http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/aca/cbo-republican-healthcare-bill-would-cover-millions-fewer-than-aca-but-reduce-federal-deficit

3 http://www.aha.org/content/16/impact-repeal-aca-report.pdf

4 https://ahip.org/health-care-dollar/

https://www.cbo.gov/publication/52849

* Average and up to savings percentages are based on all discounted prescriptions that were run through the ScriptSave WellRx program in 2016. Discount percentages represent savings provided off of pharmacies’ retail prices for consumers who do not have a discount program and pay cash.

 

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Crestor (rosuvastatin),
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ScriptSave WellRx - diabetes glucose monitor check image

by:
Cherokie S. Boyd
Pharmacy Intern P1
SinfoniaRx Florida

What a time to be a person with diabetes! These days there are more medications on the market than ever to help you control your diabetes. But how do you know which medication is right for you?

Of course you should always consult your physician or your local pharmacist for medical advice. However, here is some information about these new medications so that you don’t feel out of the loop.

Some of the current insulin medications that you are used to are Lantus, Humalog, and NovoLog. These medications deliver the hormone insulin to your blood so that insulin can tell your cells to take in more glucose. This keeps your blood sugar down.

Then there are oral medications, like Metformin and Januvia. They both work by making your liver produce glucose less often. Metformin also makes your body more sensitive to the insulin that is already made in your body, while Januvia works to help your body increase insulin production. All of that keeps your blood sugar down.

Now we have the new kids on the block. The GLP’s (glucagon-like peptides), sometimes referred to as Incretin mimics. The GLP’s that are available by brand name are Victoza and Saxenda, Byetta and Bydureon, Tanzeum, and Trulicity. These medications work in three ways.

  • They increase the hormone incretin which triggers your pancreas to make its own insulin
  • They inhibit the hormone glucagon which is responsible for telling your liver to make more blood glucose
  • They make you feel fuller for longer by delaying gastric emptying, which helps you lose weight.

Now that last point is what has caught most people’s attention. It is true that some of these GLP’s can be used for weight loss, too. If you have type 2 diabetes, you know that losing weight is a benefit to help control blood sugar in overweight patients. These medications in particular can also affect your natural insulin production, which means you can get a lower dose of your insulin medications. It’s a win-win! But these medications are not to be used as a first line of defense against your diabetes. These medication’s main claim to fame is that they lower your A1C by 1% in most patients.

Your A1C is a blood test you get at the doctor’s office. It’s a measurement that can detect how well your blood sugar is being controlled over a period of 3 months. Usually you want this result to be somewhere under 7%. This reflects that your blood sugar is being controlled for a longer amount of time. Controlled blood sugar limits your risk for complications such as nerve pain and kidney problems.

Did I mention that these GLP medications can cost you around $700 a month? Not to worry. If these medications sound like something you want to add to your regimen don’t hesitate to talk to your doctor about them. They might be on your health plans insurance formulary, or you might qualify for a prescription discount with the ScriptSave WellRx savings program. Compare it to your insurance copay. It may be cheaper!

Keeping your diabetes in control can be a struggle. Never forget the amazing impact that a diet full of vegetables can have for your body. Keep your body moving. Ample exercise each week is another natural way that you can get your prescribed insulin dose lowered.


ScriptSave WellRx Prescription Savings & Wellness News

Do you need to save money on insulin medications, like Lantus, Humalog, and NovoLog?

Visit www.WellRx.com to compare prices at pharmacies near you.

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