Prevent shingles - ScriptSave WellRx image

by Alyssa Kasher
PharmD Candidate of 2018

It’s likely you’ve heard about shingles, or may even know someone who has had the painful rash, but what exactly is shingles, and how can you prevent it? The varicella-zoster virus (VSV) causes two distinct forms of infection, chickenpox and shingles. It’s important to recognize how you can contract this virus and what you can do to protect against it.

If You’ve Ever had Chickenpox, You Can Develop Shingles

A primary VSV infection occurs when you’re first exposed to the virus, referred to as varicella or chickenpox. Chickenpox is a highly contagious condition spread through direct person-to-person contact, sneezing, or coughing. Most people recognize it from the itchy blisters or “pox” that appear all over the body.  In healthy people, the condition is mild and resolves within 5-10 days1.  As chickenpox resolves, the varicella-zoster virus retreats into the nerve cells and goes into hiding. The virus’s ability to evade the immune system allows it to lay dormant until future reactivation1. Although anyone previously infected with chickenpox will carry VSV in their system, not everyone will experience the virus’s reactivation.

According to the CDC, 1 in 3 Americans will experience the reactivation of the VSV. When this occurs, it manifests as a secondary infection called herpes zoster or shingles1. The virus travels down a nerve and produces a patch of painful lesions on the skin that may permanently scar or discolor the skin.

Shingles is More Dangerous Than Chickenpox

As the infection moves down the nerve, it causes inflammation resulting in damage or cell death2. This causes the most painful and lasting effect of the infection, called peripheral neuropathy or nerve pain. Inflammation may also occur in the eyes and the brain causing serious and potentially fatal complications1. Shingles is more dangerous than chickenpox, especially because it usually occurs in older people who may have weaker immune systems with less ability to fight off the infection.

How Can You Prevent Shingles? Vaccination

The first vaccine to prevent the primary VSV infection, or chickenpox, was not developed until 1995. This means much of the older population has been exposed to chickenpox. Zostavax, the first vaccine to prevent the reactivation of the virus (shingles), did not come out until 20064.  Many people may have already received the Zostavax vaccine. However, a better vaccine has taken its place.

Shingrix: A Better Way to Prevent Shingles

In the fall of 2017, Zostavax was replaced by Shingrix as the CDC recommended vaccine to best prevent shingles and related complications. Shingrix, unlike Zostavax, is not a live vaccine and cannot cause shingles. Shingrix is given in two doses, and is over 90% effective at preventing shingles3. The CDC recommends that everyone over the age of 50 of receive Shingrix. You should get the Shingrix vaccine if you have already had shingles, previously received Zostavax or if you’re not sure you had chickenpox as a child. Studies show that 99% of Americans over 40 have been exposed to the chickenpox virus whether they realize it or not3.

Patient populations at the highest risk of shingles include:

  • those over 50
  • immunocompromised patients
  • females
  • anyone with underlying chronic lung and kidney disease.

Facts About Shingrix3

  • After your first dose of Shingrix, you should receive the second dose within 2-6 months.
  • You can receive the vaccine at your community pharmacy without a prescription.
  • Shingrix is covered by Medicare Part D. Ask your pharmacist to see if your plan covers it.
  • Shingrix can cause injection site soreness and pain. Using ibuprofen or Tylenol can help.
  • Talk to your pharmacist or doctor to see if Shingrix is right for you.
  • Always discuss all conditions/medications with a doctor or pharmacist before getting a vaccine.

References

  1. Albrecht, MA. Clinical manifestations of the varicella-zoster virus infection: Herpes zoster. In: Basow DS, ed., UpToDate. Waltham (MA).: UpToDate; 2016.
  2. Albrecht, MA. Epidemiology and pathogenesis of varicella-zoster virus infection: Herpes zoster. In: Basow DS, ed., UpToDate. Waltham (MA).: UpToDate; 2016.
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Vaccines & Preventable Diseases. Vaccines by Disease. Shingles. Retrieved at https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/shingles/public/zostavax/index.html. Accessed 2018 Jan 22.
  4. Immunization Action Coalition. Chickenpox (Varicella): Questions and Answers. Retrieved at: http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p4202.pdf. Accessed 2018 Jan 22.

If you’re struggling to afford your medications,
visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you.
You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!

0 views

Medicine Chest Must Haves - image

Here are ten must-haves for every home medicine chest:

Plain soap

Good ol’ soap and water is still the best way to clean minor cuts and scrapes. It works just as well as antibacterial soap—and it’s less expensive!

A compression wrap

If you twist your ankle or wrist, remember the RICE treatment: Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation. Elastic wraps, such as those made by ACE, are the compression component of the RICE equation. “These are excellent for giving support to a sprained joint,” says Jennifer Zimmer, MD, an internal medicine doctor at the Dallas Diagnostic Association and the Baylor Regional Medical Center in Plano, Texas.

Aspirin

Not only for headaches and hangovers, but if you’re at risk for something far more serious: “If you have chest pain, chew up 325 mg of uncoated aspirin,” advises Singh. “Heart attacks can happen any time and taking aspirin as soon as possible can help reduce the damage.” Aspirin can help break down the blood clot in your artery and limit the injury to your heart. Keep in mind, however, that there are many different types of chest pain and that aspirin is not the right treatment for many of them. Rare use is relatively safe but repeated aspirin use can cause harm. Talk to you doctor to learn about your heart-disease risk and what to do in an emergency.

Bandages (assorted sizes)

Not just for kids! You need these, as well, to keep your boo-boos and owies from becoming infected.

A thermometer

Experts recommend a digital thermometer over the mercury type (which are just as accurate but difficult to read). “A good thermometer can monitor for temperature elevation that could indicate infection in a wound or worsening of an illness,” says Zimmer.

Mild pain relievers

Stock acetaminophen or ibuprofen for minor pain and fever. “Remember to check doses, though, as children take a dose based on their weight,” advises Singh.

Antibacterial ointment

Apply after cleaning a wound to help reduce infection risk and increase healing time.

An antihistamine

Use to relieve minor allergy symptoms like sneezing, itching and swelling. Call 911 if you have a severe allergic reaction—such as difficulty breathing, or swelling of the tongue or lip—as an antihistamine won’t help.

Hydrocortisone cream

This is useful for taking itch out of rashes and insect bites.

Phone numbers

Inside the door of your medicine cabinet, adhere contact info for your family members, doctors, pharmacy, and your local poison control center. If there is an emergency, this cost-you-nothing strategy can prove to be priceless.

Remember to check the contents of your kit every 6 to 12 months to ensure that medicines haven’t expired, and that your contact numbers are still up-to-date.

Finally, it’s also handy to keep a first-aid kit in your car and your day-trip backpack. And think about other places a kit could be useful. Going on vacation? Remember to take one with you to the cabin, boat, or wherever else your road leads. Go well!

Nancy Gottesman, a health and nutrition writer in Santa Monica, CA, is stocking her first-aid kit now.

Copyright © 2018 Healthnotes, Inc. All rights reserved. www.healthnotes.com

Learn more about Healthnotes, the company.


If you’re struggling to afford your medications,
visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you.
You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!

0 views

Treating and preventing osteoporosis - image - wellrx

by Tek Neopaney, University of Arizona College of Pharmacy Student

Each year, millions of Americans, who may otherwise feel fine, are diagnosed with Osteoporosis. Developing osteoporosis puts people at higher risk for fractures, especially in the hips, spine, and wrists. Women are at much higher risk, with 10 percent of women age 50 and older affected by osteoporosis, compared with just two percent of men that age.

What is Osteoporosis?

Osteoporosis is defined by low bone mass that results in decreased bone density, and bones become more prone to fracture. Osteoporosis often has no symptoms until there is a bone fracture. Bone strength decreases with the loss of bone mass, which is related to many factors such as, a decrease in bone mineral density, rate of bone formation and turnover, and the shape of the bones.

Postmenopausal women often have low bone density due to estrogen deficiency. With early diagnosis of bone loss and fracture risk, available therapies can slow or even reverse the progression of osteoporosis and help prevent bone fracture1. Vertebrae and hip fracture is common in osteoporosis patients. About two-thirds of the bone fractures are asymptomatic2, meaning patients won’t even be aware they have a fracture. Many patients without symptoms assume they don’t have osteoporosis, so it’s important for all post-menopausal women to get an osteoporosis evaluation.

Calcium Vitamin Supplements

If you are unable to achieve adequate amounts of calcium and vitamin D from diet alone, you should take supplements for bone growth and development. Children ages 9 to 18 should consume approximately 1300 mg of calcium per day from calcium rich food sources, and 600 mg of vitamin D from vitamin D-fortified food. Children who have a wide variety of foods in their diet, and are growing well, should not need calcium and vitamin D supplementation3. Calcium and vitamin D supplementation likely only benefits children with inadequate calcium and vitamin D intake3.

Most postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, 1200 mg calcium (total dietary and supplement) and 800 international units of vitamin D are recommended. Although optimal intake of calcium (diet plus supplement) for pre-menopausal women and men with osteoporosis is not established, generally suggested doses are 1000 mg of calcium (diet and supplement) and 600 international units of vitamin D4.

Exercise – It’s Important!

Exercise is strongly associated with a reduction in hip fractures in older women5. Regular exercise has shown to have positive effect on bone mineral density (BMD). BMD is the measure of calcium in your bone. In studies, a variety of exercises such as, jogging, resistance training, swimming, and walking were effective. Women with osteoporosis should exercise for at least 30 minutes a day, three days a week, to build bone strength and help prevent fractures. Exercise helps to increase muscle strength, reducing the risk of fracture from fall.

Pharmacological Therapy

In addition to lifestyle measures and calcium and vitamin D supplementation, patients at high risk for fractures should also receive drug therapy. Patients with a history of fragility fracture or osteoporosis based on BMD, benefit from medication. All patients treated with medication should have a normal calcium and vitamin D level prior to starting drug therapy, and should also receive vitamin D and calcium supplements if their dietary source is inadequate6.

Oral bisphosphonates such as, alendronate (Fosamax), ibandronate (Boniva) are the first line of therapy for postmenopausal women. These agents decrease the rate of bone breakdown leading indirectly to an increased BMD. Bisphosphonates are effective, inexpensive, and have long-term safety data on preventing hip and vertebrate fracture6. These drugs are usually taken once a weekly.

Putting it All Together

With so many Americans developing osteoporosis, it’s important to realize it could happen to you, so talk to your doctor about your risks. To help prevent, and possibly reverse Osteoporosis:

  • Bond density screening is important to detect osteoporosis
  • Get enough calcium and Vitamin D in your diet or take supplements to help prevent osteoporois
  • Exercise helps build bone mass and strengthen your bones
  • There are available drugs to treat osteoporosis that are inexpensive and have proven safe to take over time.

References:

  1. Cosman F, de Beur SJ, LeBoff MS, et al. Clinician’s Guide to Prevention and Treatment of Osteoporosis. Osteoporos Int 2014; 25:2359.
  2. World Health Organization. Assessment of fracture risk and its application to screening for postmenopausal osteoporosis. Geneva 1994. http://whqlibdoc.who.int/trs/WHO_TRS_843.pdf  (Accessed on March 09, 2012).
  3. Winzenberg TM, Shaw K, Fryer J, Jones G. Calcium supplementation for improving bone mineral density in children. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2006; :CD005119.
  4. Cosman F, de Beur SJ, LeBoff MS, et al. Clinician’s Guide to Prevention and Treatment of Osteoporosis. Osteoporos Int 2014; 25:2359.
  5. Gregg EW, Cauley JA, Seeley DG, et al. Physical activity and osteoporotic fracture risk in older women. Study of Osteoporotic Fractures Research Group. Ann Intern Med 1998; 129:81.
  6. Crandall CJ, Newberry SJ, Diamant A, et al. Comparative effectiveness of pharmacologic treatments to prevent fractures: an updated systematic review. Ann Intern Med 2014; 161:711.

If you’re struggling to afford your medications,
visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you.
You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!

0 views

asthma inhaler image

by Tek Neopaney

What is Asthma?

Asthma is a chronic disease that affects the airway tubes of the lungs. During asthma attacks, the walls inside of the airway become sore, swollen, and red and produce mucus, making it harder to breathe. The airway tubes become very sensitive when they are inflamed and may react strongly to allergens. Air movement in and out of the lungs is constricted when inflammation is present, resulting in shortness of breath.

What Makes Asthma Worse?

There are many triggers of asthma. Common inhaled allergens that you may encounter at a daycare, home, school or work can trigger an asthma attack. Some avoidable allergens include mold, excretions from dust mites, cockroaches, and mice.

It’s common for many patients with high blood pressure to also have asthma. Some of the most effective and proven blood pressure medications are known to cause negative effects in people with asthma, so care is required in developing effective treatment plans.

Of the many different drugs available for treating hypertension, beta blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have the most potential to cause problems for asthma patients.

Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) are medications commonly used for pain. However, NSAIDs, like naproxen (Aleve), and ibuprofen (Motrin) can sometimes make asthma symptoms worse. Other body reactions, including upper airway illness, hormonal fluctuation, and extreme emotions, can trigger asthma attacks.

How Can You Control Your Asthma?

Influenza can worsen asthma symptoms and cause complications, so it’s important to get a flu vaccine annually. The best way to treat asthma is identifying and avoiding triggers, taking medication regularly in order to prevent symptoms, and treating asthma episodes as they occur. Home monitoring of the peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) can be very helpful, because it measures the airflow through airway and thus the degree of obstruction of airways. A peak flow meter is inexpensive and an easy way to assess asthma control.

Symptoms of Uncontrolled Asthma

If you have any of the following symptoms it’s considered uncontrolled asthma:

  • Coughing, wheezing, rapid breathing, or tightness of the chest experienced daily
  • Nighttime awakening more than twice a week
  • Need to use a short acting inhaler more than twice a week
  • If the asthma symptom is interfering with normal activities

Medications Used in Asthma Treatment

Long acting anticholinergic agents or beta agonists are the mainstay of asthma therapy. Common medications include:

These medications should be used regular for asthma control. Often, these medications can be combined. For example, in case of severe asthma, patients are often prescribed Acidinium and formoterol fumarate to use together on a regular basis.

Short acting inhalers, sometimes called rescue inhalers, are used for immediate symptomatic control:

How Do Asthma Medications Work?

Long acting anticholinergic agents work by competitively inhibiting the action of airway constriction. Short acting inhalers help to open up the airways by relaxing muscles of airway tubes.

Making an Asthma Action Plans

When you have asthma, your goal is to have a normal active life, and good control of your asthma. If your asthma is not well controlled, you may need to increase your medication and learn more about what triggers your asthma attacks. Your physician and pharmacist can provide you with information and an action plan to take care of your condition, so you can continue to be active and healthy.

References:

  1. Bateman, Eric D., et al. “Overall asthma control: the relationship between current control and future risk.” Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology 125.3 (2010): 600-608.
  2. Kew, K. M., & Dahri, K. (2016). Long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMA) added to combination long-acting beta2-agonists and inhaled corticosteroids (LABA/ICS) versus LABA/ICS for adults with asthma. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, (1).
  3. Friedman, B. C., & Goldman, R. D. (2010). Influenza vaccination for children with asthma. Canadian Family Physician56(11), 1137-1139.
  4. Zheng, T., Yu, J., Oh, M. H., & Zhu, Z. (2011). The atopic march: progression from atopic dermatitis to allergic rhinitis and asthma. Allergy, asthma & immunology research3(2), 67-73.

Download the free WellRx app from the iOS app store or the Google Play Store,
and get registered to take advantage of our free medication adherence tools.

If you’re struggling to afford your medications,
visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash discount price at pharmacies near you.
You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!

0 views

Medication for insomnia image

by Alyssa Kasher, PharmD Candidate 2018
University of Arizona College of Pharmacy

Sleep is a precious commodity that everyone needs to function. Individual sleep needs are different; some people need a few extra hours while others need less. Some people are light sleepers, while others “sleep like logs.” Sleep habits can also change temporarily, for example during college or after a baby is born. Despite varying needs, all people need adequate sleep to function. Sleep loss negatively affects work performance, mood and overall health. In light of this, it is important to identify factors that are causing you to lose sleep. It’s important to speak with your doctor to see if ongoing sleep problems are caused by clinical insomnia.

How do I know it’s clinical insomnia?

Clinical insomnia is diagnosed by having all of the following 3 conditions1:

  1.       Difficulty falling asleep, staying asleep, or waking up too early
  2.       The above difficulty occurs even with plenty of time to sleep in an ideal environment
  3.       Sleep loss causes decreased function during the daytime

What causes insomnia?

Historically, insomnia has been viewed as a condition that occurs secondary to another disease or condition. Recent studies show us that insomnia does occur by itself without any identifiable reasons1. You should still check with your doctor to see if another medication you take or condition you have is causing insomnia.

Treatment of insomnia

First line treatment for insomnia includes behavioral counseling and improving sleep hygiene. For information on non-drug therapies, check out our previous blog post written by Jenny Bingham, PharmDShould you and your doctor decide to use medication to treat insomnia, it is important to tell your doctor about other medication you are taking as well as any conditions you have.

Over the Counter Medications

  • Antihistamines purchased over the counter are commonly used to induce sleep as they can cause drowsiness1. While they are helpful, these medications should only be used short term. If your problems with sleep continue, you should consult with your doctor to ensure you get the appropriate treatment.

Prescription Medications

  • Non-benzodiazepines include other sleep drugs with varying mechanisms. They differ from benzodiazepines in that they usually have less anti-anxiety effects. Some of these drugs are approved only for short term use; while drugs formulated as extended release are better suited for long term use1.
  • Antidepressants can be used for sleep as many of them have a sedating effect. These are particularly useful in people who concurrently suffer from depression or anxiety, because the drug is also treating a potential cause of insomnia. The only antidepressant specifically FDA approved for insomnia is Silenor (doxepin) 1.
  • Other drugs are used for insomnia that have unique mechanisms
    • Rozerem (ramelteon) is a drug that encourages your body to release melatonin, which makes you sleepy. It has less side effects and less addiction potential than other drug types. It is also not a controlled substance.
    • Belsomra (suvorexant) is a first of its kind drug that blocks molecules in your brain that encourage wakefulness1. Because it has a long half-life, it can still cause day time drowsiness. It is a controlled substance due to abuse potential.

General Considerations

  • Sleep medications can make you drowsy, dizzy or experience day time sedation.
  • Many medications used to treat insomnia have a potential to be habit forming. They may also worsen insomnia if stopped suddenly. Use them exactly as directed by your doctor.
  • Sleep medications can impair your ability to perform tasks, so it is crucial to only take them once you are ready for bed. Do not use alcohol as impairment may be worsened.

Considerations in the Elderly

  • Since most sleep medications cause drowsiness to induce sleep, they can be especially dangerous when used in the elderly. This is true of both over the counter sleep medications (like diphenhydramine) as well as prescription drugs. This drowsiness can cause confusion, memory issues and serious falls. Consult your pharmacist or doctor before starting sleep medication.

 

References:

  1. Arand DL, Bonnet MH. Treatment of insomnia in adults. In: Basow DS, ed., UpToDate. Waltham (MA): UpToDate; 2016

Download the free WellRx app from the iOS app store or the Google Play Store,
and get registered to take advantage of our free medication adherence tools.

If you’re struggling to afford your medications,
visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash discount price at pharmacies near you.
You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!

0 views

managing-insomnia

by Jenny Bingham, PharmD, BCACP
SinfoniaRx

What is insomnia?

The prevalence of insomnia increases with age, especially in women. Individuals can experience one of two different types: acute or chronic. Acute or transient insomnia lasts for days to weeks. Chronic insomnia lasts for more than one month. 1

A general consensus estimates that approximately one-third of adults experience insomnia. Characteristic symptoms include: difficulty initiating sleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, waking up too early, and/or poor quality of sleep. 2

Why is it important to treat insomnia?

Untreated insomnia can have negative outcomes on an individual’s overall health. It is been associated with altered physical health, emotional health, mental health, social functioning, pain control, and overall health perception. 3

What can you do to treat insomnia?

There are two approaches to treating insomnia without medications. 4

Sleep hygiene

  • Keep a regular sleep schedule.
  • Do not exercise immediately before bedtime.
  • Avoid alcohol and stimulants (caffeine, nicotine) in the late afternoon and evening.
  • Maintain a comfortable sleeping environment that is dark, quiet, and free of distractions.
  • Avoid consuming large amounts of food or liquids immediately before bedtime.

Stimulus control

  • Go to bed only when you are sleepy.
  • Avoid daytime naps.
  • If unable to sleep, get out of bed and go to another room— only return to your bed when you feel the need to sleep.
  • Do not eat or watch TV in bed.
  • Wake up at the same time each day.

Individuals should also ask their provider about management of other underlying causes of insomnia, like psychiatric or other medical conditions. It’s important to limit prescription sleep aids to short-term use. After initiating any treatment for insomnia, whether behavioral or prescription, it’s important to reevaluate after a few weeks.

References:

  1. Schutte-Rodin S, Broch L, Buysse D, et al. Clinical guideline for the evaluation and management of chronic insomnia in adults. J Clin Sleep Med 2008; 4:487–504.
  2. Ancoli-Israel S, Roth T. Characteristics of insomnia in the United States: results of the 1991 National Sleep Foundation Survey. I. Sleep. 1999 May 1; 22 Suppl (2):S347-53.
  3. Katz DA, McHorney CA. The relationship between insomnia and health-related quality of life in patients with chronic illness. J Fam Pract. 2002 Mar; 51(3):229-35
  4. Dopp JM, Phillips BG, Chisholm-Burns M. Sleep Disorders. Pharmacotherapy Principles & Practice and. 3e; 41: 737-747.

Download the free WellRx app from the iOS app store or the Google Play Store,
and get registered to take advantage of our free medication adherence tools.
If you’re struggling to afford your medications,
visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you.
You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!

Controlling Your Fibromyalgia

by Kali Schweitzer, PharmD candidate 2018
University of Arizona College of Pharmacy

Dull, aching pain throughout your entire body. Trouble sleeping. Irritable mood. What could possibly be going on? Is it just in your head? Does anyone else feel like this? Well, if you experience some of these symptoms, one potential cause could be fibromyalgia, which affects the lives of almost 4 million Americans.

Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain condition that, while common, is not entirely understood or easy to manage.  Because the exact cause of this condition is not known, effective treatments are difficult to come across, and it’s common for patients to find themselves spending a lot of money trying to find a cure. Often times the suggested treatment is a combination of both lifestyle changes and medications. Ideally, by following the recommendations of your health care team and putting effort into your treatment plan, you will be in a good position to prevent your fibromyalgia from controlling your life and emptying your wallet.

Lifestyle Changes Can Help Fibromyalgia Symptoms 

First and foremost, physical therapy as well as certain daily exercises may be the key to keeping your symptoms at bay.  Suggested exercises include yoga, tai chi, walking, swimming, biking, and other low impact activities. Exercise has the potential to increase quality of life and reduce severity of pain over time.

Another way to improve your symptoms is sleep hygiene, which involves evaluating and making changes to some of your day time habits that may keep you from getting a good night’s sleep.  Some things to try include avoiding caffeine too late in the day and removing screens (phones, computers, televisions) from the bedroom.  By getting more quality sleep at night, you have the potential to majorly improve your symptoms.

In addition to exercising and changing your sleep habits, certain types of therapy may also be beneficial for some patients. This could include both group sessions and one-on-one sessions to address any potential underlying problems that may be making your symptoms worse.

Medications for Fibromyalgia

When it comes to medications, there are multiple options available, and occasionally, combinations may be necessary.  Many of the medications used for fibromyalgia can also be used to treat other things, such as depression, seizures, muscle spasms, and more.  Your doctor may prescribe one or more of the following medications to help control your symptoms:

It is important to keep in mind that with fibromyalgia, there is no miracle cure.  Some people may wonder whether or not opiates or narcotics (such as oxycodone, morphine, etc,) can be used to help with their pain, but these do not have proven benefit with fibromyalgia and are generally not recommended. Trying medication after medication can become costly, especially if you need to start taking multiple medications.  By working on lifestyle changes and giving the medications a chance to work, you will be on the right track to saving money and energy as well as getting back to a normal life.

 

References

  1. https://www.cdc.gov/arthritis/basics/fibromyalgia.htm
  2. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/fibromyalgia/home/ovc-20317786
  3. Goldenberg DL. Initial treatment of fibromyalgia in adults. In: UpToDate, Schur PH (Ed), UpToDate, Waltham, MA

Download the free WellRx app from the iOS app store or the Google Play Store,
and get registered to take advantage of our free medication adherence tools.

If you’re struggling to afford your medications,
visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you.
You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!

0 views

Don't forget your meds on vacation

by Hayde Blanco, 2018 PharmD Candidate

Whether you’re heading for the ski slopes or escaping the cold in a tropical destination, medications are likely the last thing on your mind as you pack for vacation. Between booking a flight, making sure you have your passport, or packing last minute luggage, medications can be easy to forget. However, if you take medications regularly, they should be one of the first things you should be thinking about. Whether you’re just going to the next state or to another country may determine what you need to do before packing your medications.

Things to remember before leaving

Check if you can fill your medications in a different state in case you are not able to receive a refill before leaving. You might also need additional travel insurance, in case something happens when on vacation.

Medications cannot be mailed in the U.S. except under certain circumstances, so if you forget to take them, you might have to pick some up when you arrive at your destination. ​​

A few days or even weeks before leaving, make sure you will have enough medications for a little longer than your planned vacation. In case there is a delay in getting home, you will be prepared without having to worry about getting more medicine.

If you will be traveling into a different time zone, you might need to adjust when you’re taking your medications. Talk to your physician or pharmacist, if there are any medications that need be taken at the same time daily, or to check if you should change how you are taking any of your medicines.

Planes, trains, or automobiles?

If traveling by plane, make sure to take medications in a carry-on bag, in case checked luggage gets lost and so they are easy to access. All medications are allowed on a plane including insulin, inhalers, and over the counter medication. If anything needs to be refrigerated, such as insulin, remember to pack it in an insulated medicine bag or container.

Taking prescription medications internationally

If you are going into another country, some of the medications you are taking might be illegal there. If you are traveling internationally, check that your medications are not on the country’s list of illegal medications. Additionally, take them in their original containers and bring a copy of the prescription, just to stay on the safe side.

Some countries are significantly more strict than others in what medications are allowed into the country. Narcotics or medications with a higher potential for addiction tend to have more restrictions in some countries. This is particularly important to look into ahead of time as it can lead to your medications being confiscated and serious drug related charges such as drug trafficking. Check the international narcotics board if you need to take any opioids to see if they are permitted in your destination country.  Always remember to check for any medication restrictions in the country you are traveling to especially if it is somewhere you have never been before.

If you need to take an EpiPen or other similar medication for an allergic reaction, make sure it is under your name. If you are likely you get a severe allergic reaction, such as anaphylaxis, consider wearing a medical identification bracelet that includes what to do in case of an unexpected reaction.

Do you need a vaccine?

Get informed on any vaccines you might need before traveling to a certain location. It’s important to get vaccinated before traveling, because in the rare instance you would catch something, you don’t want to bring it back to the U.S. and cause a possible outbreak. To read more about getting travel vaccines, check out this previous post.

Know your medications and diagnosis

If you are traveling for an extended time, ask your doctor about a list of possible generic alternatives, as well as a prescription, and diagnoses of what you are taking your medications for. Since some areas will only fill prescriptions written in that country, they might need to write a new prescription, and the medication you are currently taking might not be an option where you are staying.

Although forgetting to pack a vitamin is usually not something to worry about, not taking a chronic medication, such as a blood thinner or a blood pressure medication, for a few days or weeks can lead to more serious consequences and potentially even a trip to the emergency department. In the excitement of planning and packing, don’t forget to pack your medications for your next vacation.

 

References:

  1. https://www.cheapflights.com/news/traveling-with-medication/
  2. https://www.osac.gov/pages/ContentReportDetails.aspx?cid=17386
  3. http://www.miusa.org/resource/tipsheet/medications
  4. http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=63470
  5. https://pe.usps.com/text/pub52/pub52c4_019.htm#ep290406

Do you need to save on your prescription medications?
Visit www.WellRx.com to compare prices on medications at pharmacies near you.
Same medications. Same pharmacies. Better prices.

 

0 views

Rhabdomyolisis can cause muscle cramps, particularly in the legs.

by Sapna S. Patel, PharmD (2017)

For many who have been diagnosed with hypercholesterolemia, commonly known as high cholesterol, changes in diet and exercise may not be enough. If your doctor has prescribed a statin medication to lower your cholesterol, you may have heard or read about the potential side effects of statin drugs and their impact on liver function.

Doctors will often prescribe statins to lower the total cholesterol and reduce the risk of a heart attack or stroke in people with high cholesterol levels. While statins are highly effective, they have been linked to muscle pain in some people, and in rare cases, even cause liver damage.

So what is rhabdomyolysis?Coca-Cola colored urine caused by rhabdomyolysis

Rhabdomyolysis is a severe, debilitating muscle pain (interferes with your ability to perform normal daily tasks) due to muscle damage and breakdown. This causes your damaged muscle to release their proteins into your bloodstream, become eliminated through your kidneys (ultimately leading to your kidney(s) shutting down), and appearing in your urine (which explains why the urine color of a patient experiencing rhabdomyolysis is referred to as “Coca-Cola” or “reddish-brown” color).

Some common statin medications are:

Statin medications can be very beneficial to your health. Statins can decrease the amount of “bad” cholesterol, which can clog your arteries, preventing oxygen-rich blood from reaching essential organs. Decreasing your “bad” cholesterol can lower your risk of having a heart attack or stroke. Ultimately, this leads to living a longer and healthier life.

The majority of Patients benefit from using statin medications if indicated by their physician. Less than 3% of patients on statins report muscle pain while less than 0.5% report rhabdomyolysis. So, don’t stop using your statin medication until your physician confirms this side effect.

Common Symptoms of Rhabdomyolysis are:

In the larger muscle groups, like your thighs, shoulders, lower back, and calves:

  • Muscle tenderness
  • Severe muscle pain
  • Muscle weakness/fatigue
  • Muscle Stiffness
  • Muscle Cramping

Other signs of rhabdomyolysis are:

  • “Coca-Cola” or “reddish-brown” urine
  • Skin changes (discoloration or blisters)

How do I know if a statin medication is causing my symptoms?

Ask your Physician for bloodwork to check for abnormal Creatinine Kinase (CK, CPK) levels, liver function, and kidney function tests. These labs are not routinely checked during bloodwork.

Symptoms of rhabdomyolysis usually occur 4-6 weeks after first starting on a statin medication. However, they can occur years after being on a statin medication, so it’s important to always be aware of the symptoms of rhabdomyolysis.

If your only symptom is muscle pain, think about other reasons why your muscles may be painful, sore, stiff, or crampy. Could it be due to unusual physical activity such as hiking up a new trail, shoveling the driveway after a massive snowstorm, or trying a vigorous exercise routine, like spin cycling or high intensity interval training?

What if I do have rhabdomyolysis?

If you do end up with a diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis, your physician will likely stop your statin medication. There are statins that have a lower risk for rhabdomyolisis, such as pravastatin (Pravachol) and fluvastatin (Lescol).

As a final note, if you’re taking a statin, you should also avoid eating grapefruit or drinking grapefruit juice. Grapefruit contains compounds called furanocoumarins that stop your body’s natural enzymes from doing their job. As a result, more of the statin drug is absorbed, making it more powerful than it would normally be.


Download the free WellRx app from the iOS app store or the Google Play Store,
and get registered to take advantage of our free medication adherence tools.

If you’re struggling to afford your medications,
visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you.
You may find prices lower than your insurance copay!

0 views

Pharmacogenomics pharmacogenetics image

by Leah Samera, PharmD Candidate, Class of 2018

As with most things, when it comes selecting a drug regimen for the treatment of chronic disease, one size does not fit all. If you take medications, you may have wondered why that is the case. One reason is because of pharmacogenomics.

Pharmacogenomics refers to “the entire spectrum of genes that interact to determine drug efficacy and safety.” In practice, many people may use the terms pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics interchangeably.

Pharmacogenetics, however, also refers to variants of one gene that affect drug response. The study of both pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics can help to optimize drug therapy and minimize drug toxicity based on an individual’s genetic profile.

What is a gene?

A gene is a series of codons that specify a particular protein. Genetic variation may result in altered protein sequence and function or in altered protein levels. This is significant, because these proteins can have an effect on how your body interacts with medications.

How do pharmacogenomic variations affect drug response?

The impact of pharmacogenomic variations on drug response have traditionally been divided into four categories:

  1. Those that affect drug pharmacokinetics. Pharmacokinetics refers to how a medication moves through a person’s body, i.e., how the drug is absorbed, distributed, metabolized, and eliminated.  An example of a genetic variation that affects pharmacokinetics is one in which drug metabolism is altered, subsequently affecting plasma concentration.
  2. Those that effect on pharmacodynamics. Pharmacodynamics refers to a person’s therapeutic response to a medication; this depends on a medication’s affinity and activity at its site of action. An example of a genetic variation that affects pharmacodynamics is one in which binding of a drug to its receptor is reduced, thereby decreasing therapeutic efficacy.
  3. Those that affect idiosyncratic reactions. An idiosyncratic reaction is an adverse reaction to a medication that is both rare and unpredictable. An example of a genetic variation that affects idiosyncratic reactions is one in which the likelihood of a hypersensitivity reaction to a certain drug is increased.
  4. Those that affect disease pathogenesis or severity and response to specific therapies. Pathogenesis refers to the origination and development of a disease. An example of a genetic variation that affects pathogenesis is a specific molecular defect related to the development of certain malignancies for which there are targeted therapies.

How can the study of pharmacogenomics help to optimize your drug therapy and minimize side effects?

Organizations like 23andMe allow people to “access, understand, and benefit” from the study of pharmacogenomics. With their simple home-based saliva collection kits, all you have to do is order their Health + Ancestry service; register, and spit into, the provided tube; and mail the kit back to their lab via the pre-paid package. Next, their lab extracts, processes, and analyzes the DNA from the cells in your saliva. Within 6 to 8 weeks, you get an email notifying you that you can view your results in your online account and discover what your DNA says about you. By sharing those results with your healthcare providers, they then can use that information to ensure that you get the most benefit from your medications while minimizing the risk of side effects.

References:

  1. Cavallari LH, Lam Y. Pharmacogenetics. In: DiPiro JT, Talbert RL, Yee GC, Matzke GR, Wells BG, Posey L. eds. Pharmacotherapy: A Pathophysiologic Approach, 10e New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; . http://accesspharmacy.mhmedical.com.ezproxy4.library.arizona.edu/content.aspx?bookid=1861&sectionid=146077703. Accessed September 12, 2017.
  2. Roden DM. Pharmacogenetics. In: Brunton LL, Knollmann BC, Hilal-Dandan R. eds. Goodman & Gilman’s: The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 13e New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; . http://accesspharmacy.mhmedical.com.ezproxy4.library.arizona.edu/content.aspx?bookid=2189&sectionid=167889559. Accessed September 12, 2017.
  3. Tantisira K, Weiss ST. Overview of pharmacogenomics. Post TW, ed. UpToDate. Waltham, MA: UpToDate Inc. http://www.uptodate.com. Accessed September 13, 2017.
  4. Our Mission. 23andMe.com. https://mediacenter.23andme.com. Accessed September 13, 2017.
  5. How it works. 23andMe.com. https://www.23andme.com/howitworks. Accessed September 13, 2017.
  6. Our science. 23andMe.com. https://www.23andme.com/genetic-science. Accessed September 13, 2017.

ScriptSave WellRx Prescription Savings & Wellness News

Do you need to save money on your IBS, Chronic Pain, Cholesterol or other medications?

Visit www.WellRx.com to compare prices at pharmacies near you.

0 views