Emergency Preparedness - medications, ScriptSave WellRx

by Leah Samera
University of Arizona College of Pharmacy
PharmD Candidate, Class of 2018

Ready, a public service campaign designed to educate and empower citizens to prepare for emergencies such as natural and man-made disasters, proclaims September to be National Preparedness Month (NPM). In the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey and in anticipation of Hurricane Irma, you may be wondering how to go about preparing for such events. This is especially important to consider if you have a chronic disease or condition.

Illness Follows Disaster

Studies have found that upwards of 70% of the Hurricane Katrina survivors had at least one chronic condition. Additionally, 58% of the visits to emergency treatment facilities in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina were due to illness, 24% of which were associated with chronic diseases. The research on disasters’ effects on chronically ill patients only serves to reinforce the fact that these emergency situations can lead to both exacerbation and death from chronic illnesses due to direct stress of the disaster, interruption of care, or both.

Emergency Plans and Kits

Organizations like the American Red Cross recommend having an emergency plan and kit prepared for use during a disaster. Some obvious items that should be included in such a kit are water, food, and first aid supplies. However, it is also critical that you have a 7-day supply of your medications on hand as well as any other tools or devices used for your health such as hearing aids with extra batteries, syringes, blood pressure cuffs, et cetera. In order to have at least a 7-day supply of your medications, you must order refills of your prescription medications as soon as you are able rather than before you run out. It is best to keep these items together and in a location that is easy to get to in an emergency.

Planning Ahead

Medications should be stored away from heat, light, and moisture; if possible, keep them in their original bottles and store the bottles in a waterproof bag or container. If you have medications such as insulin that need refrigeration, have a freezer pack and cooler available. It is also important to stay up-to-date on all immunizations, including tetanus, especially if you have diabetes. Additionally, because the stress of these disasters can exacerbate your conditions, it is best to also make appropriate lifestyle changes such as restricting salt intake if you have high blood pressure or learning the carbohydrate counting approach if you have diabetes.

Other Handy Emergency Items

Other items that you should have handy in case of an emergency include any over-the-counter medications you may need like pain relievers, as well as your medication list and insurance card. It is important to keep an up-to-date medication list that not only catalogs the names of your current medications but also their strengths, indications, directions, and prescribers; any bad or allergic reactions you may have had to medications in the past should also be documented. Your prescription benefit card may be needed for approval of an emergency supply if you run out of or lose your medications, or if your medications get damaged or contaminated.

In the event that you end up requiring medications and health resources:

  • RxOpen.org maps open and closed pharmacies, American Red Cross shelters, and infusion centers in areas affected by disasters.
  • The charity Direct Relief provides free prescription drugs and medical supplies to low-income patients at community health centers or clinics.
  • Keep a list of nearby pharmacies and hospitals as well as their phone numbers.

By doing what you can to prepare for disasters, you can lower your risk of exacerbations of your health conditions. As the theme for NPM states: “Disasters Don’t Plan Ahead. You Can.”

References:

  • National Preparedness Month. https://www.ready.gov/september. Accessed September 7, 2017.
  • Kessler RC, Hurricane Katrina Community Advisory Group Hurricane Katrina’s impact on the care of survivors with chronic medical conditions. J Gen Intern Med. 2007;22(9):1225–1230. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2219784. Accessed September 8, 2017.
  • Sharma AJ, Weiss EC, Young SL, et al. Chronic disease and related conditions at emergency treatment facilities in the New Orleans area after Hurricane Katrina. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2008;2(1):27–32. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18388655. Accessed September 8, 2017.
  • Be Prepared for an Emergency. Be Red Cross Ready! http://www.redcross.org/get-help/prepare-for-emergencies/be-red-cross-ready/get-a-kit. Accessed September 7, 2017.
  • Emergency Preparedness for Prescription Medications. http://www.mayo.edu/pmts/mc6000-mc6099/mc6012-39.pdf. Published 2016. Accessed September 7, 2017.

Are you concerned Hurricane Irma
may impact your prescription refills?
The State Law may be on your side; early refills are permissible.

For medications not covered by insurance,
the ScriptSave® WellRx program is here to help.

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high medication prices image

by Leah Samera
University of Arizona College of Pharmacy
PharmD Candidate, Class of 2018

It’s one of the most common questions we hear at ScriptSave: “Why are prescription medications so expensive?” With insurance deductibles going up and insurance companies providing less reimbursement, drug prices are outpacing the inflation rate. So why do drug companies continue to charge exorbitant prices for medications? The simple answer is, because they can.

There are a number of factors that affect the cost of medications. In the United States, drug costs are vastly higher relative to other countries. What sets the U.S. apart is that drug manufacturing companies are permitted to set their own price for a given prescription drug. Conversely, in countries with national health insurance systems, a separate organization negotiates drug prices or rejects coverage if the manufacturer proposes what is felt to be an excessive cost.

Market Exclusivity

The reason why brand name drug manufacturers are able to set such high prices in the United States is because they are “protected” from competition, and they have a lot of negotiating power; this leads to those manufacturers having market exclusivity. Market exclusivity is when the FDA allows a manufacturer to market their drug without generic competition. According to Kesselheim, et al. the median length of post-approval market exclusivity is 12.5 years for widely used drugs and 14.5 years for highly innovative, first-in-class drugs.

New medications are automatically protected from generic competition for anywhere between 5 and 12 years. On top of that, manufacturers may also receive patents that can last 20+ years. These companies can even extend their patent period by testing in children through the pediatric exclusivity program. They can also apply for additional patents on nontherapeutic aspects of a drug, such as the method of administration, coating, and formulation. Manufacturers can thus periodically implement and patent small changes to a drug, thus prolonging their market exclusivity.

Pay for Delay

Aside from legal protection, some brand-name manufacturers have historically negotiated with and offered financial incentives to generic manufacturers to defer introduction of a generic product until a later time; this is referred to as pay for delay. Some brand-name manufacturers have even paid generic manufacturers to cancel introduction of their generic product altogether. Brand-name manufacturers have also offered rebates to third party administrators of prescription drug plans to promote their product versus others in its class.

What About Generic Drugs?

Generic products can become expensive as well because, for some drugs, there is lack of motivation to create additional generic competitors. The number of generic manufacturers for a given drug depends on factors such as the size of the target population for the drug, availability of ingredients, and mergers in the industry. Those generic manufacturers with little competition may then raise prices.

Dispense As Written

It is also important to note that there are several laws and people involved in the process of writing and distributing a prescription medication. Physicians write prescriptions, pharmacists fill and sell prescription medications, and patients and/or insurers pay for said medications. The separation in these roles can often lead to physicians being unaware of drug prices and therefore not taking this consideration into account in clinical decision making. Several states also may not require pharmacists to conduct generic substitution, and all states allow physicians to write dispense as written prescriptions that pharmacists cannot substitute with a generic product.

How to Save Money on Prescription Drugs

Fortunately, the ScriptSave WellRx prescription savings program offers instant prescription discounts at the register on both brand name and generic prescription medications. Over 62,000 pharmacies across the U.S. participate, and there’s no enrollment fee or usage limits. Although there are many forces in the market that increase drug costs, ScriptSave WellRx delivers prescription savings solutions that can help you and everyone in your household save money on medications — even pets!

Registered members have access to a free suite of personal wellness tools in the Medicine Chest, including:

  • Ask a Pharmacist
  • Pill Reminders
  • Refill Reminders
  • Medication Information (in both English and Spanish)
  • Medication Videos
  • Mood-tracking (to review side effects, etc.)
  • Price-check and Pharmacy Locator

Download the free WellRx app from the iOS app store or the Google Play Store, and get registered to take advantage of our free medication adherence tools. If you’re struggling to afford your medications, visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you. You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!

References:

  • Kesselheim AS, Avorn J, Sarpatwari A. The high cost of prescription drugs in the United States: origins and prospects for reform. JAMA 2016; 316:858–871. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27552619
  • https://www.wellrx.com/faq

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prescription medications,
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pill boxes medication adherence

If your doctor has prescribed a medication for you, you want to be sure you’re getting the most benefit from that drug. Medication adherence is important to get the most benefit from the medications used to treat your condition. The causes of non-adherence, when a patient either accidentally or knowingly does not take medications as prescribed, can be complex. Non-adherence is often the result of cost; patients who simply can’t afford their medications. However, good habits and a good understanding of the medication can also be a big part of adherence, and can help you stick to your medication schedule.

Medication Adherence

World Health Organization defined adherence as “the extent to which a person’s behavior – taking medication, following a diet, and/or executing lifestyle changes, corresponds with agreed recommendations from a health care provider.” The concept that healthcare professionals manage medical conditions is true only in case of hospitalized patients. The bottom line is, medications don’t work in patients who don’t take them, or don’t take them as prescribed.

In an outpatient setting, the healthcare professionals’ role is limited to providing products (medications and/or monitoring devices) and educational tools. Taking medications, on time and properly, is left up to the patient or their in-home caregiver. There are several techniques to help you remember to take your medications as prescribed and manage their own medical condition. As the patient, you have the ultimate control for safe and effective treatment.

Two Steps to Medication Adherence
Adherence to medication can be achieved in two simple steps; understanding and behavior changes. Understanding includes knowledge of your medical condition and how your prescribed medication can help to manage it. Here are a few helpful websites:

  1. http://www.patienteducationcenter.org/ – The health-related content on the website is provided by Harvard Medical School. Medical conditions are listed alphabetically from A to Z.
  2. https://medlineplus.gov/ – Produced by the National Library of Medicine, provides reliable information on medical conditions, drugs, herbs, and supplements.
  3. https://www.wellrx.com/ – ScriptSave® WellRx allows you to search for the lowest prices on prescription medications at nearby pharmacies, and provides overviews of the medications. Our Ask a Pharmacist phone line lets you talk to a pharmacist about prescription medicines, dosing, or medication interaction questions. Registered members have access to a free suite of personal wellness tools in the Medicine Chest, including:
  • Ask a Pharmacist
  • Pill Reminders
  • Refill Reminders
  • Medication Information (in both English and Spanish)
  • Medication Videos
  • Mood-tracking (to review side effects, etc.)
  • Price-check and Pharmacy Locator

Behavioral changes mean finding ways to stay on track with your medication schedule. Finding the right tool or a combination of methods that fit best your lifestyle is key to medication adherence. Here are some ways to stay on track:

  1. Integrate your medication to your daily routine, such as brushing your teeth or watching your favorite TV show.
  2. Set one/multiple daily alarm using a clock, mobile phone, or computer.
  3. Ask a family member and/or friend give you a call remainder.
  4. Pill boxes are another way to organize your scheduled medications. Pill boxes are available in different forms that allow you/your caregiver to fill them daily, weekly, or even monthly.
  5. Medication charts can be developed by own or with the help of a healthcare professional. Keep an updated chart with medication names, dose, when you take them, and what are you taking them for. You can refer to the chart if you get confused with your medications.
  6. Plan ahead for medication refills and mark a calendar to make sure you always have your medication when necessary.
  7. If you have a smart phone, the free ScriptSave WellRx app can be used to remind you to take your medications, refill your medications, and track how the medications make you feel.

We hope these tips on medication adherence have helped. Download our free app from the iOS app store or the Google Play Store, and get registered to take advantage of our free medication adherence tools. If you’re struggling to afford your medications, visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you. You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!


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prescription medications,
visit www.WellRx.com.
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62,000 pharmacies nationwide.

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Behavioral health medications for anxiety or depression - image

Jenny Bingham, PharmD
University of Arizona College of Pharmacy

There are a number of mental conditions that shape mood and behavior. Any condition that affects a person’s thinking, feeling or mood, falls into a medical classification of Behavioral Health.  Such conditions may affect someone’s ability to relate to others, or maintain reasonable function every day. Each person may have different experiences, even if they have the same diagnosis as someone else.

Depression is the most common behavioral health condition in the general population1. Without treatment, depression can lead to decreased quality of life2, increased suicidal thoughts, and overall worsened health outcomes. The most common method of treating depression is to target serotonin and how the body uses it.  Serotonin regulates mood and ultimately is what makes you feel happy. When we have low serotonin levels, you can feel depressed or anxious. Antidepressants each have their own unique mechanism of action that are specific to certain neurotransmitters in the brain.

Anxiety can affect our ability to function due to excessive worry. Without treatment, anxiety can also lead to a worsened quality of life and can even be debilitating for some patients3. Anxiolytics are the medication class used to treat anxiety. The most common method of treating anxiety is to target serotonin and/or norepinephrine.  Norepinephrine is responsible for motor action, cognition, the body’s alert system, and feeling energetic.  When we have low norepinephrine, it is harder to cope with every day stressors and things that are beyond our control.

How do these medications work?  

These medications are often classified as reuptake inhibitors. They target the neurotransmitters serotonin and norepinephrine, to name a few.  Medications prevent the body from recycling these neurotransmitters. By preventing them from being recycled too soon, it allows the body a better chance to use them to improve mood and/or relieve anxiety.

What can you do to make them work better for you?

We know that the body needs certain building blocks to make serotonin and norepinephrine. An important concept to remember is that no matter how many medications are prescribes to treat these conditions, they don’t stand a chance at being effective without the right precursors; an interesting concept in today’s world. The majority with these conditions take more than one medication.

Step 1: What is your protein source?

The greatest building blocks for serotonin are things that you might already have in your kitchen.

Complete proteins are the main precursor for tryptophan, which is later turned into serotonin. You might think that tryptophan only comes from turkey on Thanksgiving, but did you know that you can also get it from eating beef, venison, buffalo, pork, fish, shellfish, cheese, cottage cheese, milk, yogurt, and eggs? 

The building blocks for norepinephrine are also found in your kitchen.

In addition to eating complete proteins, it’s also important to eat incomplete proteins as well. You can find these in nuts, grains, beans, legumes, and soy.

Step 2: What else is included on your meal plan?

When we think about serotonin building blocks, key vitamins play an important role as well.

  • Vitamin B6. Great nutritional sources of this vitamin are found in whole grains, vegetables, and nuts.
  • Vitamin B12. This vitamin is found in meats, fish, liver, and milk.
  • Folic acid and Vitamin D3 are often found in fortified foods.
  • Omega-3 Fatty Acids are found in fish, dairy, and grains.

Step 3: Don’t forget about your supplements and vitamins.

Over-the-counter supplements can help you fulfill your dietary need of the vitamins mentioned above. But, there is a caveat.  Did you know that you can actually take “too much” of a vitamin? When in doubt always review your supplements and medications with your pharmacist for safe use.

As a patient, take comfort knowing that you can control how well your medications work for you. You are the rate limiting factor in the equation. These simple modifications can make a world of difference with managing depression and anxiety. After all, the best investment you’ll ever make is in yourself.

References:

  1. Kessler RC, Ormel J, Petukhova M, et al. Development of lifetime comorbidity in the World Health Organization world mental health surveys. Arch Gen Psychiatry 2011; 68:90.
  2. Daly EJ, Trivedi MH, Wisniewski SR, et al. Health-related quality of life in depression: a STAR*D report. Ann Clin Psychiatry 2010; 22:43. 
  3. Kessler RC, Chiu WT, Demler O, et al. Prevalence, severity, and comorbidity of 12-month DSM-IV disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication. Arch Gen Psychiatry 2005; 62:617.

For the best Rx price on prescription
depression or anxiety medications,
visit www.WellRx.com.

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Is your blood pressure too high?

by Rick Lasica, PharmD
Post-Graduate Year 1 Resident

High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, affects nearly 1 in every 3 adults in the United States. Hypertension is often referred to as the “silent killer,”  because for the most part, hypertension doesn’t have any warning signs or symptoms. You might not even know you have it. If left untreated, hypertension increases your risk for heart disease and stroke, two of the leading causes of death in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). So when is high blood pressure too high?

Blood Pressure by the Numbers

Blood pressure is reported as two numbers: systolic blood pressure (top number) and diastolic blood pressure (bottom number). Systolic pressure is the pressure of your blood against the walls of your heart when it beats, while diastolic pressure is when it rests (between beats). Normal blood pressure is less than 120/80 and pre-hypertension (the range before an actual diagnosis of hypertension) is between 120-139 for the top number and 80-89 for the bottom number. A consistent blood pressure reading of 140/90 or greater means you have hypertension.

Preventing and Treating Hypertension

Luckily, there are many ways to prevent and treat hypertension. Lifestyle factors such as smoking tobacco, eating foods high in sodium, not exercising enough, being obese, and drinking alcohol, all increase the likelihood of developing hypertension. These are manageable risk factors that should be minimized or avoided. If all of these lifestyle factors for hypertension are modified in a positive manner and your blood pressure is still high, your doctor might start you on a medication to help it stay controlled. There are several classes of hypertension medications, all of which work differently in the body. Each class of medications works differently to lower your blood pressure, and has unique side effects you should be aware of. Your doctor or pharmacist can discuss these with you.

Common High Blood Pressure Medications

The angiotensin II receptor blocker Valsartan (Diovan) is one of the top high blood pressure medications, followed by the beta blocker Metoprolol Hydrocholorothiazide (Lopressor HCT), Olmesartan (Benicar), and Olmesartan and HCTZ (Benicar HCT).

Other frequently prescribed high blood pressure medications are the ACE inhibitor, Lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), Amlodipine besylate (Norvasc), a calcium channel blocker, and the generic diureticHydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ).

See Your Doctor for High Blood Pressure

It’s important to see your healthcare provider regularly so that they can monitor your blood pressure. Let them know all of the medications you are taking, including anything that doesn’t require a prescription, such as herbals and supplements, since these might be contributing to your high blood pressure. Also, if a new medication to treat your high blood pressure is needed, they will work with you to find a blood pressure medication that doesn’t interact with a medication you might already be taking.

By working with your healthcare provider, you can keep your blood pressure under control to help ensure a long and healthy life!

Resources:

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  2. Mayo Clinic
  3. WebMD

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visit www.WellRx.com.

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Role of vitamin d and statin induced muscle pain

by James Ketterer, PharmD

Statins are a class of drugs used to lower cholesterol and decrease the risk of cardiovascular events. They work by inhibiting an enzyme from completing an early step in the body’s process of synthesizing cholesterol. Statins are among the most commonly prescribed medications in the country. Approximately 1-2% of patients on statins report experiencing muscle pain. This pain can present itself in a variety of ways but most often results in flu-like aches and pains. The muscles may feel stiff or sore like the feeling after working out. This usually effects the larger muscles of the body such as parts of the back or thighs. This side effect is often responsible for patients discontinuing the use of these drugs.

Does Vitamin D Play a Role in Statin-induced Muscle Pain?

Do statins cause muscle pain? The exact cause of this phenomenon is not completely understood, but many researchers have hypothesized that vitamin D levels may play a role. Vitamin D is mainly produced in the skin from sun exposure. However, this source is not active. The liver and kidneys are responsible for activating the vitamin D which then plays a role in facilitating intestinal absorption of essential nutrients as well as balancing bone health homeostasis. Vitamin D deficiencies often present with similar muscle pain as those found as a side effect in statins.

Some researchers have theorized that statins could reduce vitamin D levels because certain types of cholesterol carry vitamin D and when the cholesterol is reduced, less vitamin D could be transported. On the other hand, many have theorized that since both vitamin D and statins are metabolized by the same enzyme in the liver, the use of statins could delay metabolism of vitamin D, thus increasing levels in the blood.

Muscle Pain in Clinical Trials

Clinical trials and various other studies and reports have yielded mixed results on muscle pain in statin users with low compared to high levels of vitamin D. A large analysis of these trials showed that more studies resulted in statin users having higher levels of vitamin D on average. One retrospective study divided statin users into 4 groups, 1 being the lowest vitamin D levels and 4 being the highest. Group 1 was 1.21 times more likely to develop muscle pain than group 4. Another study showed statin users with vitamin D levels of less than 15 ng/mL were 1.9 times more likely to experience muscle pain compared with non-statin users. The statin users with higher levels of vitamin D did not have higher risk for muscle pain compared with non-statin users.

When a patient experiences what is believed to be the side effect of a drug, they are often taken off of the drug to see if the symptoms resolve. If they do resolve, sometimes the patient is started back on the drug to see if the symptoms return. This a referred to as a “rechallenge”. One chart review showed that returning vitamin D levels to a sufficient level before a rechallenge in statin users who had experienced muscle pain, increased their tolerability to statins.

Do Vitamin D Supplements Help Reduce Statin-induced Muscle Pain?

Some studies have given vitamin D supplements to statin users experiencing muscle pain. While these studies were uncontrolled, they did show improvement in muscle pain in nearly 90% of patients.

These are just a few of the examples of research looking at the correlation between stain use and vitamin D levels as a possible cause of muscle pain. While nothing is definitive at this point, patients on statins that are experiencing muscle pain may want to explore vitamin D supplementation as a possible resolution plan. The benefits of statins are well documented in patients with heart risks. Any side effects should be attempted to be overcome before giving up on the statin and assuming it is the cause.

References:

Gregory, Philip J. ” Vitamin D and Statin-Related Myalgia”. Medscape. 2017. Web. 10 Mar. 2017.

Simvastatin.  Micromedex Solutions.  Truven Health Analytics, Inc. Ann Arbor, MI.  Available at: http://www.micromedexsolutions.com.  Accessed March 20, 2017.


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ScriptSave WellRx - Heliobactor Pylori stress image

Heliobacter pylori Eradication and Antibiotics

by: Derek Matlock
Pharm.D. Candidate 2017
Washington State University

Heliobacter pylori is a bacteria highly prevalent worldwide and is closely linked to duodenal ulcers (which affect the upper section of your small intestine), gastric ulcers, and peptic ulcer disease. It is also linked to an increased risk of developing gastric cancer in an infected person. Despite being more common in developing countries with poor socioeconomic conditions, the American College of Gastroenterology states that 30-40% of the U.S. population is infected with H. pylori, putting them at risk for conditions such as peptic ulcer disease — which affects the stomach lining — and gastric cancer.

Anitbiotics for Ulcers?

Numerous research studies and testing have not only supported these correlations, but they have also demonstrated the benefits of eradication using medications, specifically antibiotics, for patients suffering from complications of H. pylori.

Prior to the discovery of H. pylori, lifestyle factors such as smoking, eating spicy and acidic foods, and stress, were considered the major causes of ulcers. Thus, the main treatment choices were popular acid suppressing medications such as ranitidine (Zantac®) or omeprazole (Prilosec®). These medications can help improve ulcer-related pain and symptoms, and might even heal the ulcer, but they do not treat the underlying H. pylori infection. Without treating the infection, symptoms and complications are likely to reappear.

Triple Therapy for Ulcers

After the discovery of the bacteria causing these conditions, appropriate antibiotics have been able to eliminate the infection in the majority of individuals, thus resolving the infection and its complications. The following antibiotic regimens are being used, and the triple therapy is the most common.

  1. Triple therapy: Omeprazole 20 mg twice daily + Clarithromycin 500 mg twice daily + Amoxicillin 1,000 mg twice daily or Metronidazole 500 mg twice daily
  2. Concomitant quadruple therapy: Omeprazole 20 mg twice daily + Clarithromycin 500 mg twice daily + Amoxicillin 1,000 mg twice daily + Metronidazole 500 mg twice daily
  3. Bismuth quadruple therapy: Omeprazole 20 mg twice daily + Bismuth subsalicylate 262 mg four times daily + Tetracycline 500 mg four times daily + Metronidazole 250 mg four times daily

Although the triple therapy remains an effective choice, a preference for quadruple therapies may soon become more common, as the risk for patients to fail treatment due to antibiotic resistance becomes a growing concern in the science community.

As the United States prevalence of H. pylori continues to decline, the resistance to antibiotics, specifically Clarithromycin, makes the infection more difficult to treat. As a patient, it is essential to inform your doctor about any recent antibiotics you may have taken, as this may help in the selection of a better treatment option.

References:

  1. American College of Gastroenterology Guideline on the Management of Heliobacter pylori Infection
  2. CDC: Heliobacter pylori Fact Sheet for HCPs
  3. Medscape: Heliobacter pylori Infection
  4. WebMD: What is H. Pylori?

 

Have questions? Ask a Pharmacist!

We want to make sure you have the information you need to safely use your prescription drugs. Connect with a pharmacist at SinfoniaRx who can help with non-emergency prescription questions
about drug interactions, and other medication-related questions.


For the best Rx price on medications,
visit
www.WellRx.com.

Compare prescription drug prices at more than
62,000 pharmacies nationwide.

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generic aspirin tablets

by: Rick Lasica, BS
University of Arizona College of Pharmacy PharmD Candidate, Class of 2017

Many people take aspirin occasionally to provide relief from various conditions (e.g. pain, inflammation, fever, headaches), but what about taking a low-dose aspirin every day for prevention reasons? As with all medications, aspirin poses various benefits and risks that need to be taken into consideration before you start taking it. Studies have shown that certain individuals would benefit the most from taking a low-dose aspirin and others shouldn’t take it at all.

Why Take Low Dose Aspirin?

Our bodies make cells called platelets, which help stop us from bleeding uncontrollably. In order to stop this unnecessary bleeding, a blood clot is formed. In this case, the blood clot is beneficial, but sometimes blood clots are formed when they aren’t needed, which have the potential to lead to a heart attack or stroke. Aspirin is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) commonly referred to as a “blood thinner” because it stops platelets from working together to form a blood clot.

Even though aspirin has many potential benefits, it also has many side effects, some serious, that might occur. Most importantly, it can increase your risk of bleeding, both inside and outside of your body. This might be noticed through your gums bleeding while brushing your teeth, any unexplained bruising on your body, or black/tarry stools. Other side effects that might occur are ringing in the ears, nausea/vomiting, dizziness, or yellowing of the eyes/skin.

The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that people aged 50-59 years with an increased risk of heart problems who have never had a heart attack or stroke in the past would likely benefit from taking a daily low-dose aspirin in order to help reduce the chance of one from happening. Also, people who have had a heart attack or stroke are at an increased risk of having another one, and would likely benefit from it as well.

However, you should never start taking aspirin, or any medication, before talking with your physician or pharmacist about it. They will make an assessment of your condition and weigh the benefits and risks of you taking it and make the ultimate decision of whether or not you should take it as part of your daily regimen. Certain people should not take aspirin if they have had any serious bleeding events, are on certain medications, have a high fall risk, or have specific medical conditions. So, next time you interact with your doctor or pharmacist, ask them if they think it is appropriate for you to take a daily low-dose aspirin.

References:

  1. United States Preventive Services Task Force Recommendations on Aspirin Use to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease and Colorectal Cancer
  2. WebMD: Aspirin
  3. FDA: Safe Daily Use of Aspirin

 

Have questions? Ask a Pharmacist!

We want to make sure you have the information you need to safely
use your prescription drugs. Connect with a pharmacist at SinfoniaRx
who can help with non-emergency prescription questions
about drug interactions, and other medication-related questions.


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ScriptSave WellRx diabetes check image

by:
Jeshvi Manhar, 2017 PharmD Candidate/ Sapna S. Patel, PharmD

ScriptSave WellRx - sound alike-look alike medications and diabetes imageSound-Alike/Look-Alike Medications are very important to identify and help reduce medication errors. There is a list of several medications starting with the letter “T” that have become available to treat diabetes. This may lead to confusion among patients and physicians, so it’s important YOU understand how to safely recognize and use your diabetes medication to minimize problems and possible complications.

Tradjenta® decreases the amount of sugar your liver makes and increases the amount of insulin your pancreas makes. This medicine is the easiest to differentiate, since it is an oral tablet taken once daily.

Tanzeum® and Trulicity® are in the same class of medications called GLP-1 Receptor Agonists. These medications are injected under the skin but, they are not the same as insulin! They decrease your blood sugar by releasing more insulin and slowing down your body’s digestion. The easiest way to differentiate these medications from insulin is that Tanzeum® and Trulicity® are injected under the skin once a week without regard to meals.

Now, let’s discuss the three medications that are insulin: Toujeo® U-300, Tresiba® U-100, and Tresiba® U-200. Insulin works by allowing blood sugar to move into the cells and be used as energy. Toujeo® and Tresiba® are considered long acting insulin and are injected under the skin once daily without regard to meals. These medications are not interchangeable! Toujeo® U-300 is the concentrated form of Lantus®. Toujeo® U-300 is 3 times the concentration of Lantus®! It would be easy to inject the wrong dose (especially when switching from one medication or concentration to another). Tresiba® U-200 is twice as concentrated as Tresiba® U-100! Toujeo® U-300, Tresiba® U-100, and Tresiba® U-200 are all packaged in green boxes, making them look alike. Before injecting your medication, take measures to ensure you know what the name and concentration of your medication is, what the box, pen and/or needle looks like, and how your medication should be used correctly. If in doubt, ask your pharmacist about the brand you’re buying and study the label before using the medication.

GENERAL INJECTION TIPS:

  1. Using 29 gauge 5mm pen needles for under the skin injection may cause less pain
  2. Roll the pen between the palm of your hands before use to decrease discomfort or pain
  3. Common injection sites are stomach and thigh
  4. Make sure to rotate injection sites to prevent buildup of fatty tissue and pain
  5. Wipe injection site with alcohol wipe then wait for a few seconds before injecting to reduce stinging
  6. Be sure to safely dispose and use a new needle prior to each injection to prevent infection.

 

Reference:

LexiComp®, 2.20.17, JM PharmD Candidate at OSU College of Pharmacy/SSP PharmD

Have questions? Ask a Pharmacist!

We want to make sure you have the information you need to safely use your prescription drugs. Connect with a pharmacist at SinfoniaRx who can help with non-emergency prescription questions about drug interactions, and other medication-related questions.


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Congress just unveiled their long-awaited replacement plan for the Affordable Care Act (ACA, or Obamacare). Unfortunately, it’s likely to leave a huge hole in insurance coverage for many in the U.S.While America waits for the final “yay or nay” from Congress, a recent study from the Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) makes note of how many are already struggling with healthcare costs,making it difficult to for those trying to find low-cost prescriptions.

Cutting Back to Pay Bills

According to the study, 43 percent of adults with health insurance report problems affording their deductible, and 29 percent say they have difficulty paying medical bills. Among those citing trouble paying their medical bills, more than 70 percent have cut back on vacations, spending on food, clothing or basic household consumer items. We feel these people should get assistance when it comes to paying for the prescription drugs they need. That’s why ScriptSave helps consumers find low-cost prescriptions at pharmacies near them—for free.

Making cuts to pay for medical bills - finding low-cost prescriptionsRising Prescription Drug Costs

The national association, America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP), has completed a study showing the majority of health insurance premiums are going towards the cost of prescription drugs.3

For those facing high out-of-pocket costs for prescription meds due to an insurance gap or high premiums, a free download of the ScriptSave WellRx prescription savings card might help. As a patient, the card (or mobile app) won’t cost a penny to use. If it helps, great—enjoy the benefit of a lower-cost medication. If not, then it didn’t cost you anything. That said, our average savings rate is 45% (with reports of savings up to 80%*), and the ScriptSave WellRx program is contracted with over 62,000 pharmacies, nationwide. You might be surprised to find out you’re eligible for low-cost prescriptions with your ScriptSave WellRx card.

ScriptSave’s long-standing mission has been to close the gaps in prescription coverage, and has a 20-year history of working with health plans and pharmacies to provide consumers with discounts on prescribed medications.

If you need to lower your prescription drug costs, ScriptSave WellRx offers help to everyone – regardless of income, age, or insurance coverage. Sign up today and save a little extra money next time you pick up your prescriptions.

 

References:

1 http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/03/07/519001659/7-things-to-watch-in-the-gops-american-health-care-act

2 http://kff.org/health-costs/poll-finding/data-note-americans-challenges-with-health-care-costs/

3 https://ahip.org/health-care-dollar/

 

* Average and up to savings percentages are based on all discounted prescriptions that were run through the ScriptSave WellRx program in 2016. Discount percentages represent savings provided off of pharmacies’ retail prices for consumers who do not have a discount program and pay cash.


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