2019 drug formulary changes - scriptsave wellrx - blog image

In the world of prescription drug insurance, there are medications that are covered by a health plan and some medications that are not covered. The list of drugs that are covered is known as the Prescription Drug Formulary (or “Formulary” for short).

What is a Prescription Drug Formulary?

If you’ve ever visited a pharmacy with a prescription in one hand and your insurance card in the other, only to be told that your medication is not covered by your insurance … but if your doctor is willing to change the prescription to a similar drug used to treat the same condition … you have first-hand experience of a Prescription Drug Formulary.

The formulary is a list of approved medications for which an insurer has agreed to help cover the cost. However, there might be multiple manufacturers of numerous drugs designed to treat the same condition. This is an opportunity for the insurance company to trim costs by only agreeing to cover one drug for each health condition.

For pharmaceutical manufacturers, this can be a very big deal to be included or excluded from an insurer’s formulary list. Accordingly, each health plan generally reviews its coverage list on an annual basis. This helps ensure they continue to get the best possible price-points for the competing medications that are available to treat high-cost health conditions.

For patients, this can mean that, each year, they may discover the drug they had been taking is no longer covered. This may require them to switch to an alternative medication to continue receiving help paying for the medication from their insurance provider.

Prescription Formulary Changes for 2019

At the time of this write-up, the calendar is fast approaching year-end, and new insurance plan-years for 2019. Many formulary lists are likely to change. Two of the largest managers of prescription drug formularies in the U.S. are Express Scripts and CVS Caremark. Here are the details of the medications these two companies are REMOVING from their lists for 2019:

Acanya  Humatrope  Saizen 
Acticlate  Invokamet XR  Savaysa 
Alcortin A  Invokamet  Sorilux 
Alocril  Invokana  Sovaldi 
Alomide  Jentadueto XR  Synerderm 
Alprolix  Jentadueto  Targadox 
Altoprev  Lazanda  Tirosint 
Atripla  Levicyn  Topicort spray 
Avenova  Levorphanol  Tradjenta 
Benzaclin  Lupron Depot-Ped  Uroxatral 
Berinert  Mavyret  Vagifem 
Brisdelle  Maxidex  Vanatol LQ 
Brovana  Nalfon  Vanatol S 
Cambia  Namenda XR  Veltin 
Chorionic Gonadotropin Neupro patch  Verdeso foam 
Climara Pro  Norco  Viagra 
Contrave ER  Norditropin  Vivelle-Dot 
Cortifoam  Nutropin AQ Nuspin  Xadago 
Daklinza  Nuvigil  Xerese cream 
Duzallo  Olysio  Xyntha Solofuse 
Eloctate Omnitrope  Xyntha 
Emadine  Onexton  Yasmin 
Embeda  Oxycodone ER  Zemaira 
Extavia  Pradaxa  Ziana 
Fasenra  Praluent  Zolpimist 
Fenoprofen (capsule) Pred Mild  Zomacton 
Fenortho  Pregnyl  Zonegran 
Flarex  Prolastin-C  Zuplenz 
FML Forte  Qsymia  Zurampic 
FML S.O.P.  Recombinate  Zypitamag

If your medications are listed above (and if your insurer uses Express Scripts or CVS Caremark to manage their formulary) you can speak to your doctor or pharmacist about alternative medications designed to treat the same health condition. You can check these alternatives against your insurer’s new formulary list for 2019.

What If My Drugs Are Excluded?

It may also be worth double-checking the cash-price (i.e., the price without insurance) for your current medication. You can do this by clicking the drug name link in the list above. This can be a worthwhile effort, as the cash-price can often be lower than an insurance copay [Read more about Always Ask Cash Price]

What If I Can’t Switch to a Covered Alternative Drug?

If you’re unable to switch medications, you may be able to get some help from the FREE ScriptSave WellRx program. We negotiate savings on the cash-prices of medications at over 65,000 retail pharmacies across the United States. Patients can save up to 80% (relative to the cash price of their prescription).

Our price-check tool is available for free — no sign-up necessary. Go to www.wellrx.com or download the ScriptSave WellRx mobile app on iOS and Android to see how much you’ll save on your prescription costs!

 

 

0 views

pharmacy gag clause quiz - scriptsave wellrx - blog image

For years, contractual clauses have kept pharmacy employees from telling their customers when a better price was available than their insurance copay for prescription medications. Recent congressional legislation has made changes to how that works.

So, how much do you know about how the Know the Lowest Price Act of 2018 and Patient Right to Know Drug Prices Act? Learn more about the impacts to the pharmacy customer by taking the Practice Trends quiz at pharmacist.com.

For more in-depth information on the latest changes to the ‘Gag Clause’ laws, check out our latest blog post, Outlawing Pharmacy Gag Clauses.

 


For the best Rx price on
prescription medications,
visit www.WellRx.com.
Compare prices at more than
62,000 pharmacies nationwide.

0 views

patient focused care - scriptsave wellrx - blog image

by Robert “Jed” Swackhammer, Ohio State University

The Patient Dilemma

A patient recently had a primary care follow-up appointment with her physician. She was concerned about waking up during the middle of the night sweaty, shaky, and dizzy. The patient’s physician decided to decrease, her insulin dosage of Lantus, a long-acting insulin.

A few weeks later, the patient received a phone call from her community pharmacist regarding a refill gap on her insulin. The patient stated that her doctor decreased her dosage of Lantus due to low blood sugars in the middle of night. The pharmacist then asked, what insulin where you injecting in the evening? The patient responded, “My Humalog,” a rapid acting insulin.

The patient had been mistakenly taking her Humalog before bed without eating, but her doctor assumed she was using the Lantus, as prescribed. It was at this time the pharmacist counseled the patient on the differences between her insulins and the appropriate time to inject them. After concluding the phone call, the pharmacist advised the patient to follow-up with her physician if her blood sugars remained uncontrolled within a week. A month later, the patient called her community pharmacist to report her symptoms resolved and her blood sugars were controlled!

Working With All Healthcare Providers

Currently, many healthcare professionals are having problems balancing the numerous responsibilities present in their day-to-day jobs. Consequently, this impacts patient care. A difficult and complicated question to ask is what should patients look for in a healthcare professional? The solution is to observe their willingness to work with all your healthcare providers. Consequently, it is important that your healthcare professional is an excellent communicator and prioritizes your needs.

Patient-focused Care

Recent studies by BioMed Central Health Services Research identified 25 different patient-centered care models. The main takeaway from the study was patient-care models consisted of communication, partnership, and health promotion to meet the needs of patients.[1] Similarly, the Nursing Clinics of North America states that in order to improve quality of care in the United States, there needs to be continued focus on 6 dimensions: safe, effective, patient-centered, timely, efficient, and equitable.[2]

It’s vital that healthcare professionals (i.e. physician, nurse practitioner, physician assistant, pharmacist, psychiatrist, psychologist, dentist, cardiologist, endocrinologist, oncologist, and many others) work with one another so that you, as a patient, receive optimal care. With this collaboration, your healthcare team will be able to appropriately share information, deliver compassionate and empowering care, and consider the sensitivity of you as an individual while addressing your needs.[3]

With the aging Baby Boomer population, all healthcare professionals should appropriately equip themselves to focus on taking care of each patient individually instead of just isolated conditions. In dealing with the rise in our elderly population, the American College of Clinical Pharmacy states that “multiple articles have been published in support of clinical pharmacists’ involvement in patient-centered medical homes (PCMH) to help complete team‐based care, enhance patient access, transitions of care, and improve the quality and safety of patient-care”.[4] All professions have a unique position on this team, including pharmacists, because we all bring a different perspective and lens with which to view and treat our patients.

It is vital that all healthcare professionals work together to help deliver optimal patient care. As a patient, you can ensure that this by observing current and future healthcare professional’s ability to communicate with one another. Remember, communication is vital, so that you can be treated as a patient and your needs are addressed.

References:

[1] Bmchealthservres.biomedcentral.com. (2018). [online] Available at: https://bmchealthservres.biomedcentral.com/track/pdf/10.1186/1472-6963-14-271 [Accessed 27 Aug. 2018].

[2] Owens L, Koch R. Understanding Quality Patient Care and the Role of the Practicing Nurse. Science Direct. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnur.2014.10.003. Published 2018. Accessed August 27, 2018.

[3] Bmchealthservres.biomedcentral.com. (2018). [online] Available at: https://bmchealthservres.biomedcentral.com/track/pdf/10.1186/1472-6963-14-271 [Accessed 27 Aug. 2018].

[4] Onlinelibrary-wiley-com.proxy.lib.ohio-state.edu. (2018). Shibboleth Authentication Request. [online] Available at: https://onlinelibrary-wiley-com.proxy.lib.ohio-state.edu/doi/abs/10.1002/phar.1357 [Accessed 27 Aug. 2018].


For the best Rx price on
prescription medications,
visit www.WellRx.com.
Compare prices at more than
62,000 pharmacies nationwide.

0 views

lab tests - scriptsave wellrx - blog image

by Samantha McKinnon, PharmD Candidate 2019
University of Arizona College of Pharmacy

Diabetes, Cancer, HIV, seizures, pregnancy, organ transplant… chances are high that you or someone you know have experienced or are currently suffering from one of these conditions. But what do they all have in common? They’re all diagnosed or screened for with lab tests. Diagnostic lab test results influence approximately 60 to 70 percent of medical decisions. Without lab tests, we wouldn’t know what to do!1

What Are Lab Tests?

A lab test is searching for something specific in your body, and can use your blood, saliva, urine, feces, breath, or organ tissue (tissue biopsy). These tests can help you and your physician determine the presence, absence, or extent of disease or monitor the effectiveness of a treatment2. They are performed by having blood drawn, spitting into a cup, having your cheek swabbed, urinating into a cup, or breathing into a special device. Some examples of lab tests you may already be familiar with are a DNA test to determine if a man is the father of a child, a urine drug test for employment, an HIV screen to test if someone does or does not have HIV, a finger-prick blood sugar test, or an alcohol breath test (breathalyzer).

Why Should I Get a Lab Test?

If you’re experiencing any unusual symptoms, a lab test may help guide you toward a diagnosis. For example, if you’ve been feeling tired and fatigued lately a lab test may determine if your thyroid is underperforming, if you have anemia, if you have an electrolyte imbalance, or if you’re developing a chronic disease such as diabetes. Sometimes, lab tests are repeated to confirm a diagnosis. If you know you’re a carrier for a disease or have a close relative with a disease you should be screened regularly3.

Catching a condition or disease early gives you more treatment options, more opportunity for lifestyle modifications, and saves you time and money4. Screenings help establish a baseline that is unique to you, and some screenings (such as breast or colon cancer) become mandatory with age. A lab test can determine how well certain organs are working, and monitor their function – most especially the kidneys, liver, heart, thyroid, and pancreas, this is especially handy as you age.

Anyone needing an organ transplant or anyone wanting to donate an organ or blood will have blood typing and compatibility testing done. Certain medications, called narrow therapeutic index drugs, as well as antibiotics, are monitored to make sure those levels don’t get too high or too low and verify treatment is working. Lab tests also can be used to substantiate specific events; such as an exposure to heavy metals, or the administration of a rape kit.

What Lab Tests are Important?

Critical or required lab tests vary by individual and their current health levels. An 80-year-old man with diabetes and a foot infection is going to need different tests than a healthy 28-year-old pregnant woman. Some lab tests are precise and reliable, while others provide general clues to possible health problems. For a generally healthy individual, some common tests that are done at your routine checkup that establish your baseline are things like:

  • Complete Blood Count (CBC) which differentiates types of blood cells
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP) that determines your cholesterol, hormone levels, electrolytes, and enzymes;
  • Hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C or A1C) which measures how much sugar is attached to your hemoglobin (the stuff in your blood that carries oxygen) and determines your risk of developing diabetes.

If you have an infection, a culture and sensitivity test will be ordered so your physician knows what the offending bacteria is and the appropriate antibiotic to treat it. Participating in your own health care is paramount to your well-being, so ask your doctor what tests are right for you.

Important Questions to Ask Your Doctor Before Having a Lab Test5

  • What will this test measure? A patient on the “blood-thinner” warfarin would want to check their INR, a patient with diabetes would measure their A1C. Knowing what you’re measuring will ensure you get only the necessary tests.
  • Why is this test necessary? Someone that has seizures may need their medication levels monitored to ensure the levels are safe and appropriate. A person with an unsteady gait may need a test to rule in or rule out Huntington’s Disease. If it’s necessary, your doctor will be able to explain the test and why.
  • Are there risks or side effects to this test? Most lab tests are benign, but some do come with some risks or negative side effects. A biopsy patient may want to have someone else to drive them to and from their appointment. Ask your physician so you can prepare accordingly.
  • How do I prepare for this test? Some tests require fasting, others require drinking a special preparation beforehand, while some require no preparation at all. Every test is different, but it’s important to follow the directions so you don’t have to repeat the test.
  • What results should I expect from this test? Results can be confusing. Sometimes you want a positive, sometimes you want a negative, other tests you may want a high number or a low number. Understanding what a normal value is will help you to interpret your result.
  • How often will I need to do this test? As mentioned earlier, some tests will be repeated to ensure the diagnosis is correct. Some screenings are done annually to monitor any changes.  Some tests are daily or weekly. Other tests are only done once, so be sure to ask how often a test is needed.

If you don’t understand something, be sure to ask your doctor to explain it to you. Some additional factors that may influence your lab test results are:

  • age
  • sex
  • race
  • weight
  • diet
  • alcohol or tobacco use
  • caffeine intake
  • stress level, and,
  • hydration status

Always request a copy of your results, and retain it for your personal medical record. After all, it is your health!

References

  1. Ngo, Andy, et al. “Frequency That Laboratory Tests Influence Medical Decisions.” The Journal of Applied Laboratory Medicine, The Journal of Applied Laboratory Medicine, 1 Jan. 2017, jalm.aaccjnls.org/content/1/4/410.
  2. Kennedy, A G. “Evaluating Diagnostic Tests.” Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice., U.S. National Library of Medicine, Aug. 2016, ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27091221.
  3. Elmore, Joann G. “Screening for Breast Cancer.” JAMA Internal Medicine, American Medical Association, 9 Mar. 2005, jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/200479.
  4. Yong, PL. Saunders, R. and Olsen, L. (2018) Missed Prevention Opportunities from The Healthcare Imperative: Lowering Costs and Improving Outcomes Roundtable. Available at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK53914
  5. Talking with your doctor. No author. Available at https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/doctor-patient-communication

 


For the best Rx price on
prescription medications,
visit www.WellRx.com.
Compare prices at more than
62,000 pharmacies nationwide.

0 views

bleeding risk - scriptsave wellrx blog image

by Randall Flores, PharmD Candidate 2019
University of Arizona

Bleeding can manifest itself in a variety of different ways which, at times, may not be easy to recognize. Some bleeds are also more serious than others and may require emergency medical attention. Bleeding frequency may also vary depending on a variety of factors such as underlying bleeding disorders or the use of certain medications.5

Potential Signs of Different Types of Bleeding

Gastrointestinal Bleeds5 
  • Bloody or black, tar-like stool
  • Weakness
  • Paleness
  • Swollen or firm abdomen
  • Vomiting or coughing blood
  • Abdominal or stomach pain
Urinary Tract Bleeds5  
  • Bright red or brown-colored urine
  • Pink urination
  • Frequent urination
  • Pain while urinating
  • Lower-back pain
Nosebleeds5  
  • Prolonged headache
  • Confusion, lethargy, and/or slurred speech
  • Discomfort to bright light
  • Double vision
  • Enlarged pupils or different size pupils
  • Dizziness and/or stumbling
  • Stiff neck or back
  • Seizures
  • Irritability
  • Loss of appetite
  • Sudden or forceful vomiting not due to upset stomach
Throat Bleeds5  
  • Choking
  • Vomiting or coughing up blood
  • Swelling or discoloration in the neck
  • Change in tone of voice
Eye Bleeds5  
  • Swelling or pain within or around the eye
  • Reddening of the white part of the eye
  • Double or blurred vision
  • Change in vision

Monitoring Lab Results While Taking Anticoagulants

Anticoagulation therapy is vital to the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic diseases; however, close monitoring is very important to treat and prevent harmful adverse effects. Lab monitoring is an important part of anticoagulation therapy to determine if it is necessary to counterbalance the anticoagulant effect of the drug4. Each drug has its own recommendations on lab monitoring depending on how it works in the body and possible adverse effects.

Coumadin (warfarin) remains the most prescribed oral anticoagulant medication worldwide despite the higher risk for bleeding compared to alternative anticoagulants1. The use of warfarin entails frequent blood tests and patient education about food and drug interactions4. The laboratory test that are most frequently monitored are prothrombin time (PT) and international normalized ratio (INR). PT is a test used to measure the number of seconds it takes for a clot to form3. INR on the other hand, is a more standardized PT measure so that it may serve as a reference value on how to adjust the dose depending on the result3. Higher INRs represent thinner blood, while lower INRs represent thicker blood.  [ Read more on our blog post, Losing the War With Warfarin? ]

New oral anticoagulants (NOACs) now formally known as direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have a few advantages over the use of warfarin. DOACs include dabigatran (Pradaxa), rivaroxaban (Xarelto), and apixaban (Eliquis). One of the biggest advantages over warfarin is that DOACs typically do not require dose adjustments and routine monitoring4. There are however some recommendations of monitoring certain parameters in patients with specific circumstances and comorbidities. Kidney function is an important parameter to monitor because all DOACs are eliminated by the kidney and impairment is a risk factor for bleeding1.

Antidote Medications to Reverse the Effects of Anticoagulants?

There are several reversal agent options for warfarin, despite its challenging management. The reversal agents used for warfarin include phytonadione (vitamin K), fresh frozen plasma (FFP), and prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC)2. The availability of these agents makes warfarin a viable option for patients who are at increased risk of bleeding and enables it to still be recommended by guidelines2.

DOACs are becoming more popular due to safety and efficacy over other anticoagulants, however only one of these agents has an FDA-approved reversal agent. Praxbind (idarucizumab) received accelerated FDA approval due to its promising results in clinical trials as a reversal agent to dabigatran (Pradaxa)2.

Currently, there is one agent called andexanet alfa that in phase III clinical trials as a reversal agent to the remaining DOAC agents2. As the use of DOAC agents become more popular, the need for effective antidotes is demanded.

Whether a someone is on anticoagulant therapy or not, it is important for people to have a general understanding about bleeding risks and how to identify different types of bleeds. Patients on anticoagulant therapy should also have a general idea about the monitoring that their therapy entails, potential risks, and management of those risks. The more patients know, the lower their chance of hospitalization from bleeding.

References:

1 Conway, S. E., Hwang, A. Y., Ponte, C. D., & Gums, J. G. (2016). Laboratory and Clinical Monitoring of Direct Acting Oral Anticoagulants: What Clinicians Need to Know. Pharmacotherapy, 37(2), 236-248. doi:https://doi.org/10.1002/phar.1884

2 Griffiths, C., Vestal, M., Livengood, S. and Hicks, S. (2017). Reversal agents for oral anticoagulants. [online] The Nurse Practitioner. Available at: https://journals.lww.com/tnpj/fulltext/2017/11000/Reversal_agents_for_oral_anticoagulants.2.aspx [Accessed 21 Sep. 2018].

3 Hull , R., Garcia, D., Vazquez, S. (2018). Warfarin (Coumadin) Beyond the Basics. UpToDate. Retrieved from https://www.uptodate.com/contents/warfarin-coumadin-beyond-the-basics

4 Ramos-Esquivel, A. (2015). Monitoring anticoagulant therapy with new oral agents. World Journal of Methodology5(4), 212–215. http://doi.org/10.5662/wjm.v5.i4.212

5 The Basics of Bleeding Disorders. (2018). National Hemophilia Foundation. Retrieved September 19, 2018, from https://stepsforliving.hemophilia.org/basics-of-bleeding-disorders/identifying-types-of-bleeds


If you’re struggling to afford your medications,
visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you.
You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!

0 views

personalized wellness - scriptsave wellrx blog image

As a nation, we spend over $5 trillion a year to feed our bodies.[1] That’s the value of food sold each year in the United States through retail and food service including nearly 38,000 supermarkets, an estimated 150,000 convenience stores, and over one million restaurants. The U.S. food industry is immense, touching every person in the nation every day.

We then spend trillions more each year taking care of ourselves. The U.S. healthcare industry is massive, projected to be over $5 trillion a year by 2025 and representing an estimated 20% of the country’s GDP.[2]

So we have two titanic industries that touch each consumer… and yet food and healthcare are largely disconnected. Plus, with 40,000+ unique products in a typical grocery store, the choices are overwhelming to the average consumer trying to shop for foods to appease any number of nutrition-sensitive health conditions.

Personalized Wellness

At ScriptSave, our vision of personalized wellness aligns managed care organizations, healthcare providers, employers, food manufacturers and retailers to improve and maintain the wellness of each individual. The power of the personalized wellness vision lies in the economic benefits provided to each member of this ecosystem.

hippocrates quote - food - scriptsave wellrx blog image

The personalized wellness food-health supply chain begins with the individual consumer, an understanding of his or her health condition, and food products beneficial to that condition. As the source of food, retailers become, in a sense, an extension of personalized healthcare, and a trusted partner in wellness for each individual. What better loyalty for a retailer than helping customers live healthier lives?

Public Health Implications

The implications from a public health perspective are enormous. 70% of Americans are on at least one prescription drug and 60% of the U.S. population is dealing with at least one chronic health condition. Our aim is to evaluate food products based on their nutritional attributes and provide insight to possible grocery alternatives that are more favorably aligned with each shopper’s personal health and wellness goals.  Our vision is no less ambitious than to improve health outcomes for millions of individuals.

ScriptSave is mobilizing key participants to realize the Personalized Wellness vision. Purchase validation of beneficial products creates a powerful feedback loop:

  • Improves future recommendations
  • Powers performance-based incentives provided by managed care organizations
  • Helps providers drive improved outcomes
  • Provides brand manufacturers powerful insight to shopper needs

holistic food focus on health - scriptsave wellrx blog image

The Rise of Artificial Intelligence

It is only recently that artificial intelligence data and technologies are available to personalize, at a product level, food recommendations that are beneficial to each individual. Deconstructing nutrition information to countless data attributes enables powerful linkage between health conditions and the hundreds of thousands of food products available across the United States. What makes it all work is the ability to convey personalized food guidance to the individual via the smartphone in their hand while in the store aisle.

“Food is the area consumers really want to deal with the most,” states Jane Sarasohn-Kahn, health economist for Think Health. “Nobody really wants to take medicine. People would rather project-manage health through food as prescription.”[3] A recent meeting with a physician group highlighted the shortcomings of efforts to date as doctors explained patients forget nearly everything within 24 hours of leaving the office.

Perhaps what is most powerful about the personalized wellness vision is that everyone across the food-healthcare supply chain benefits from improved health outcomes and quality of life for the individual. Retailers gain stronger customer relationships as they come to be viewed as true partners in wellness, and consumer goods brand manufacturers have a path to redemption from the processed foods abyss.

About ScriptSave:

For more than two decades, ScriptSave has been closing the gaps in healthcare and prescription coverage with innovative savings programs for the uninsured, under-insured, and insured. Headquartered in Tucson, ScriptSave solutions, analytics, and unique expertise save consumers money and increase medication adherence, while attracting and retaining loyal, profitable customers, members, and patients for our clients. ScriptSave is a member of the MedImpact, Inc. family of companies. For more information on ScriptSave WellRx – Personalized Wellness, go to www.wellrxplus.com. Follow us: @SSWellRx (Twitter), ScriptSave WellRx (Facebook).

References:

[1] “U.S. Food Retail Industry – Statistics & Facts”, Statista, www.statista.com/topics/1660/food-retail/

[2] Mark Hagland, “Medicare Actuaries: U.S. Healthcare Spending to Soar to $5.631 Trillion and 20.1 Percent of GDP in 2025”, www.healthcare-informatics.com, (July 18, 2016)

[3] Drug Store News, Future Trends: Self care, wellness shift to drive innovation in new, emerging health segments, www.drugstorenews.com, (August 18, 2017)


This blog post has been excerpted from the ScriptSave WellRx Personalized Wellness Whitepaper. You can read the full whitepaper content at Winsight Media:

http://www.winsightgrocerybusiness.com/wellness/health-wellness-gets-personal

http://www.winsightgrocerybusiness.com/wellness/personalized-wellness-virtual-dietitian

http://www.winsightgrocerybusiness.com/wellness/healthcare-food-align-benefit-individual

 

0 views

obesity in the U.S. - scriptsave wellrx blog image

by Randall Flores, PharmD Candidate 2019
University of Arizona

In the past few decades, there has been an alarming and steady increase in obesity rates in the U.S. This affects people of all races and ages. More Americans live with obesity than breast cancer, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and HIV all together. The medical community has been aware of the rising epidemic for many years, yet its response has not been effective at addressing the problem.

What is a Healthy Weight (BMI)?

Obese or overweight is defined as weight that is higher than what is considered a healthy weight for a given height measured as Body Mass Index (BMI)1. The levels of weight measured by BMI are listed below:

  • BMI < 18.5 = underweight
  • BMI 18.5 to <25 = within normal weight
  • BMI 25 to <30 = overweight
  • BMI >30 = obese

The Facts About Obesity

With an estimated population of 328.73 million people in the U.S.,6 the prevalence of obesity was 39.8% between 2015-2016, affecting nearly 93.3 million people.1 The estimated health care cost of obesity was $147 billion in 2008 which was $1,429 higher than those of normal weight. Obesity seems to have a racial/genetic link as Hispanic and non-Hispanic blacks had the highest prevalence with 47% and 46.8% respectively.2 Much of the obesity seen in the U.S. starts at a younger age and transcends into adulthood with a prevalence of 18.5% (ages 2-19) nearly affecting 13.7 million children.2 Similar to adults, obesity in children is more common in certain populations; Hispanics having the highest prevalence (25.8%) followed by non-Hispanic blacks (22%).2

Obesity-Related Health Conditions

The most common obesity-related diseases that result in premature deaths include type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and certain types of cancers such as colorectal, pancreatic, and endometrial cancer.1,4 People who have obesity are also at increased risk for serious diseases including the following;3

High blood pressure Low quality of life
High levels of bad cholesterol &
low levels of good cholesterol
Sleep apnea & breathing problems
Gallbladder disease Mental illness, depression, anxiety, &
other mental disorders
Osteoarthritis Body pain & difficulty with physical functioning

A Push for Prevention

The epidemic of overweight and obese citizens in the nation is complex and has no simple solution. There are many factors that play a role in obesity. Due to its complexity, the epidemic of obesity needs to be approached through multiple outlets, with tactics in local, state, and federal organizations as well as professional health organizations.5 The long-term goal to decreasing obesity is shifting to norms of a healthy lifestyle, which include healthy eating and regular physical activity.5 Healthcare should also shift more of its efforts towards preventing obesity. Another key player in reversing the obesity epidemic is implementing community efforts that support a healthy lifestyle, such as food services, schools, childhood care, and clinics/hospitals.

Obesity and being overweight affects millions of people in our nation and worldwide. Obesity is associated with an increased risk of many serious diseases that are otherwise preventable. We must shift our efforts to the epidemic of obesity to halt its progression and strive towards a healthier future for younger generations to come.

 

References:

  1. Adult Obesity Facts | Overweight & Obesity | CDC. (2018). Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/adult.html
  2. Children Obesity Facts | Overweight & Obesity | CDC. (2018). Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/childhood/index.html
  3. Adult Obesity Causes & Consequences | Overweight & Obesity | CDC. (2018). Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/childhood/index.html
  4. Obesity and Cancer. (2018). Retrieved from https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/obesity/obesity-fact-sheet
  5. Strategies to Prevent Obesity. (2015). Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/strategies/index.html
  6. S. and World Population Clock. (2018). Retrieved from https://www.census.gov/popclock/

Download the free WellRx app from the iOS app store or the Google Play Store,
and get registered to take advantage of our free medication adherence tools.

If you’re struggling to afford your prescription medications,
visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you.
You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!

0 views

Pharmacy Gag Clause - pharmacist perspective - ScriptSave WellRx blog image

by Mitchell Welton, PharmD Candidate 2019
University of Arizona

After the much anticipated release of the 2016 Gallup poll, which had Americans assign a rating of honesty and ethical standards in professions, Pharmacists found themselves in a top-three ranking for the 14th straight year.1 In last year’s poll however, it seems the general public’s opinion of pharmacists had shifted slightly. With increased news coverage and scrutiny over rising drug prices, it seemed harder for patients to be able to separate the practices of big pharmaceutical companies with the copay price that the pharmacists were asking for at the drug counter.

Pharmacy Gag Clauses

Although the community pharmacist was unable to control the inflating cost from the manufacturers, there was a more insidious practice taking place that kept their hands tied and mouths shut, even though patients might have been paying more for their prescription medications than they needed to. This was due to pharmacy gag clauses, written into the contracts between the pharmacy and pharmacy benefit managers (PBM). These clauses prevented a pharmacist from telling the patient at the point of sale if the cash price was lower than their insurance copay. To violate such a gag order would mean risking the pharmacy’s network contracts with its PBMs and facing other sanctions.2

An example of this practice will help explain why the opinion of pharmacy ethics and honesty were not found in the top-three ranking in last year’s poll: A patient’s spouse went to pick up her generic medication, telmisartan, from their local pharmacy. He paid $285 for a 90-day supply. Before the 90-day period he and his wife decided to go on a trip and would run out of her previous fill before returning home. He went to go purchase another 90-day refill out of pocket and found out the cash price was $40. While a spokesperson for the PBM involved in this event confirmed that the $285 copay was correct he was unable explain why that dollar amount was so much higher than the cash price of the medication.3 Overpayments like this, known as “clawbacks”, have unfortunately not been isolated events, and the occurrence was recently quantified by the University of Southern California’s Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics.

[ Read more about PBM Pharmacy Clawback’s ]

The study which was completed in March of this year looked at available pharmacy claim data from 2013. The study analyzed over nine million claims in which they found close to a quarter of them to involve overpayment. The average amount patients overpaid was $7.69 and overpayments on a brand name medication were significantly higher although not as frequent. 4

States Take the Lead

Between 2016 and August 2018 at least 26 states have enacted laws prohibiting “gag clauses” in pharmacy contracts. The most recent action came from the White House on October 10, 2018, when President Donald Trump signed into law the “Know the Lowest Price Act” and the “Patient’s Right to Know Drug Prices Act” which banned gag clauses immediately upon signature. This has represented a major victory for pharmacists who have had to remain silent while they watched the patients they care about struggle to pay for their medications. 2

How Pharmacists Feel About Gag Clauses

Pharmacists and law makers alike are disturbed that such practices have been allowed to exist. Senator Susan Collins, Republican of Maine, said, “I can’t tell you how frustrated these pharmacists were that they were unable to give that information to their customers, who they knew were struggling to pay a high co-pay.” Senator Martin M. Looney, Democrat of Connecticut said, “This is information that consumers should have, but that they were denied under the somewhat arbitrary and capricious contracts that pharmacists were required to abide by.” 5 Pharmacist Robert Iacobucci Jr., who owns White Cross Pharmacy in North Providence, Rhode Island expressed his frustration,” There’s no other profession in the world where you can’t tell your customer how to best utilize their money.”  When you see a 98-2 vote from the senate in such a divisive political climate to eliminate these gag clauses, it is telling that change was long overdue.

For more than a decade pharmacists have consistently been thought of as the pinnacle of honesty and ethical behavior when evaluating professions. The recent ban on these gag clauses will allow pharmacists to maintain that respected title and get back to what they do best; Improving the health and outcomes of their patients.

 

References

  1. Gallup, Inc, and Jim Norman. “Americans Rate Healthcare Providers High on Honesty, Ethics.” com, 19 Dec. 2016, news.gallup.com/poll/200057/americans-rate-healthcare-providers-high-honesty-ethics.aspx.
  2. Snyder, Lynn S, and John S Linehan. “New Federal Laws Banning ‘Gag Clauses’ in the Pharmacy.” The National Law Review, 30 Oct. 2018, natlawreview.com/article/new-federal-laws-banning-gag-clauses-pharmacy.
  3. Thompson, Megan. “Why a Patient Paid a $285 Copay for a $40 Drug.” PBS, Public Broadcasting Service, 19 Aug. 2018, pbs.org/newshour/health/why-a-patient-paid-a-285-copay-for-a-40-drug.
  4. Van Nuys, Karen, et al. Overpaying for Prescription Drugs: The Copay Clawback Phenomenon. USC Schaeffer, Mar. 2018, http://healthpolicy.usc.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/2018.03_Overpaying20for20Prescription20Drugs_White20Paper_v.1-2.pdf.
  5. Pear, Robert. “Why Your Pharmacist Can’t Tell You That $20 Prescription Could Cost Only $8.” The New York Times, The New York Times, 24 Feb. 2018, nytimes.com/2018/02/24/us/politics/pharmacy-benefit-managers-gag-clauses.html.
  6. Povich, Elaine S., and Tribune News Service. “The ‘Gag Clause’.” The Lewiston Tribune, 1 July 2018, lmtribune.com/business/the-gag-clause/article_8c269796-7d54-5116-86ca-f3e59da23fae.html.
  7. Cauchi, Richard. “Ncsl.org – Legislative News, Studies and Analysis.” Prohibiting PBM “Gag Clauses” That Restrict Pharmacists from Disclosing Price Options: Recent State Legislation 2016-2018, 22 Aug. 2018, pm, ncsl.org/.
  8. Gallup, Inc, and Megan Brenan. “Nurses Keep Healthy Lead as Most Honest, Ethical Profession.” com, 26 Dec. 2017, news.gallup.com/poll/224639/nurses-keep-healthy-lead-honest-ethical-profession.aspx.

Download the free WellRx app from the iOS app store or the Google Play Store,
and get registered to take advantage of our free medication adherence tools.

If you’re struggling to afford your prescription medications,
visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you.
You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!

get the best rx prescription savings - scirptsave wellrx blog image

For most Americans, chances are good you’re spending too much on your prescription medications. The increasing cost is staggering. And with so many companies offering discounts on prescriptions, it can sound like a scam. As the saying goes, if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

ScriptSave® WellRx is part of Medical Security Card Company, LLC; bringing some of the most advanced technology, pharmacy expertise and customer service in the industry for more than 20 years.

While we can tell you what we do and how we really can help you save on your prescription costs, we’d rather let you see what folks who have saved, some who were skeptics, have to say.

get the best rx savings card free - scriptsave wellrx - blog image find the best rx price - scriptsave wellrx - blog image







And, yes. We even help with the cost of some pet medications!

get your best rx savings card free - scriptsave wellrx blog image

Get your free Rx discount card!

If you need assistance affording your prescriptions, sign up for a free ScriptSave WellRx card or download the free prescription savings app, and save on your medications next time you visit the pharmacy.

 

0 views

what to tell the dentist about medicine you take - scriptsave wellrx - blog image

by Heather Lee, PharmD Candidate
University of Arizona

A Guide to Medication Warnings

When you visit the dentist, you expect to answer typical questions regarding your oral health, such as how often you are brushing your teeth or the infamous question of whether or not you floss. It may surprise you when your dentist asks what medications you take at home. Why would it matter if the dentists knows what you’re taking? Many medications, which includes prescriptions, over-the-counter, and even herbal medications, can affect your oral health and it is important for the dentist to know what you take so they can determine the best course of action for your oral health.

Blood Thinners

Many patients are currently on blood thinners or antiplatelet therapy to prevent the risk of blood clots. Common examples of blood thinners include warfarin (Coumadin), dabigatran (Pradaxa), apixaban (Eliquis), rivaroxaban (Xarelto), and edoxaban (Savaysa). Common examples of antiplatelet medications include clopidogrel (Plavix), ticlopidine (Ticlid), prasugrel (Effient), ticagrelor (Brilinta), and/or aspirin. Taking these medications is important to prevent blood clots, but they can also increase the risk of bleeding, especially during a dental procedure. The risk increases if you are taking multiple medications to prevent clots.  It is important for the dentist to know if you are taking these medicines so they can take extra precautions to prevent bleeding, such as stopping the medication temporarily or controlling the bleeding through local measures. They can control the bleeding through various methods, such as mechanical pressure, agents that stop the bleeding, or suturing. The dentist can make a more informed decision with what they want to do with the medication when they have a better knowledge of the type of medication you’re taking, your bleeding risk, and what procedure you’re going in for.1

Dry Mouth

Having a dry mouth can be caused by a variety of different factors, such as a medication’s side effect, having a certain medical condition, or personal habits (mouth breathing and alcohol/tobacco use).

Saliva plays an important role in maintaining your oral health through multiple ways by:

  • Reducing the population of bacteria in the mouth
  • Neutralizing acid caused by bacteria, which damages your teeth
  • Repairing tooth enamel that may have been damaged by acid
  • Washing food particles away2

A lack of saliva can cause dry, cracked lips, bad breath, infections in your mouth, and cavities. Medications that can cause this include medications used to control allergies, asthma, blood pressure, pain, and depression.

Your dentist can help by:

  • Recommending a special gel or rinse to keep your mouth moist
  • Prescribing or applying a fluoride containing toothpaste or mouthwash to prevent cavities3

Other ways to relieve this symptom can include:

  • Chewing sugar-free gum or sucking on sugar-free hard candies to increase the flow of saliva
  • Sucking on ice chips
  • Drinking water with meals to help with chewing and swallowing food
  • Using alcohol-free mouthwash
  • Avoiding carbonated drinks, caffeine, tobacco, and alcohol
  • Using a lanolin-based lip balm to soothe dry lips3

Enlarged Gum Tissue

There are some medications that may increase your risk of getting enlarged gum tissue, which is also known as “gingival overgrowth”. This is usually associated with antiseizure medications (phenytoin), immunosuppressive drugs (cyclosporine), and calcium channel blockers (including nifedipine, verapamil, diltiazem, and amlodipine). If your dentist is aware you are taking these medications, they may encourage you to do professional cleaning more often throughout the year and educate you on how to improve your brushing technique.4

Jaw Pain

There have been some reports of individuals who had difficulty healing or jaw pain after going through invasive dental procedures or even a tooth extraction. This can be due to bone death caused by a lack of blood supply (osteonecrosis). The common factor in these individuals were that they were taking a medication from the bisphosphonate class. Bisphosphonates are usually used to prevent bone weakening or destruction and are commonly prescribed to treat osteoporosis. Examples include risedronate (Actonel), zoledronate (Zometa), alendronate (Fosamax), and ibandronate (Boniva).

Over 90% of cases were in patients receiving an IV form of the drug. The risk is thought to be less than 1% of patients receiving an IV form, but they were at least ten times more likely to be affected than those who took the oral form. If you are on this medication, your dentist can discuss ways to minimize the risk of needing invasive procedures, such as tooth extractions and surgery. They may consider more conservative treatments, such as a root canal procedure. They can provide preventative advice regarding whether you need professional cleaning more often, how to observe any changes in your mouth, and how to be more careful with taking care of your teeth and gums.5

The following may increase your risk of developing jaw pain:

  • Older age (greater than 65 years)
  • Treatment with chronic corticosteroids
  • Long-term use of bisphosphonates
  • Gum infection that damages the gum and can destroy the jawbone (periodontitis)6

Signs to watch out for:

  • Gum wounds that heal very slowly or do not heal for six weeks or more after a procedure
  • Exposed bone
  • ”Roughness” on gum tissue
  • Pain if the open wound becomes infected
    • Pus or swelling
    • Numbness, especially in the lower jaw, if the infection lasts long enough5

Current treatment options include:

  • Antiseptic rinses to help prevent the growth of bacteria
  • Antibiotics
  • Cleaning/removal of dead bone from the affected area
  • Possible referral to a specialist or a surgeon for further evaluation5

Updating Your Dentist Regarding Medications

These are just a few of the reasons of why it is important to inform your dentist regarding what medications, over-the-counters, and herbal supplements you take. Your dentist can take extra precaution when you come in and educate you as to the best way to maintain your oral health when they are aware of what medications may be affecting it. The next time you go in, bring an updated medication list so your dentist is on the same page as to what you are taking at home.

References:

  1. Anticoagulant and Antiplatelet Medications and Dental Procedures. https://www.ada.org/en/member-center/oral-health-topics/anticoagulant-antiplatelet-medications-and-dental-. Accessed October 31, 2018.
  2. Department of Health & Human Services. Teeth and drug use. Better Health Channel. https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/conditionsandtreatments/teeth-and-drug-use. Published June 30, 2014. Accessed November 1, 2018.
  3. Managing dry mouth. The Journal of the American Dental Association , Volume 146 , Issue 2 , A40
  4. Staff SBI. Gingival Enlargement. The American Academy of Oral Medicine. http://www.aaom.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=132:gingival-enlargement&catid=22:patient-condition-information&Itemid=120. Accessed November 2, 2018.
  5. Staff SBI. Bisphosphonate Therapy. The American Academy of Oral Medicine. http://www.aaom.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=78:bisphosphonate-. Accessed November 2, 2018.
  6. Dental management of patients receiving oral bisphosphonate therapy. The Journal of the American Dental Association. 2006;137(8):1144-1150. doi:10.14219/jada.archive.2006.0355.

Download the free WellRx app from the iOS app store or the Google Play Store,
and get registered to take advantage of our free medication adherence tools.

If you’re struggling to afford your prescription medications,
visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you.
You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!

0 views

avoiding hospital readmissions - scriptsave wellrx - blog image

by Eli Kengerlinski, PharmD Candidate 2019
University of Florida, College of Pharmacy

Congestive Heart Failure (CHF), occurs when your heart muscle doesn’t work as well as it should to pump blood. Some conditions, like narrowed arteries in your heart (coronary artery disease) or high blood pressure, gradually leave your heart too weak or stiff to pump efficiently. Most patients struggling with CHF usually present to the hospital with shortness of breath, the most frequent symptom in patients with deteriorating CHF.1 It is crucial to be able to identify if your CHF is worsening. Early management of CHF can prevent hospitalization and equip you with the proper knowledge to identify trigger factors, improve the signs and symptoms of heart failure, and help you live longer.

Presenting CHF Symptoms

Usually CHF patients present to the hospital with worsening symptoms of:

  • Shortness of breath and/or difficulty breathing while lying down
  • Weight gain (over 2 kg), usually due to leg or ankle swelling caused by fluid retention.

However, there are major medical conditions reported in literature that can occur simultaneously in a patient with CHF, such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and Coronary Heart Disease (CHD).1 Therefore, patients hospitalized with worsening CHF can be admitted for more than one reason such as pneumonia (respiratory infection due to COPD worsening), pulmonary edema (fluid built up in lungs due to CHF), or CHD event (heart attack or stroke).

Hospital Readmissions

Patients readmitted following COPD exacerbation have 10-20% readmission rate within 30 days post hospital discharge, especially during May to November compared to January indicating seasonal admissions.4 Accordingly, it is crucial to use your inhalers, as prescribed with proper technique throughout the year, and inform your doctor if your symptoms are getting worse during seasonal changes. Also, management of other conditions like CHF, high blood pressure and cholesterol, can help reduce COPD readmission rates, as one condition can worsen another if not properly managed.

How to Tell if  Your Condition is Worsening

Congestive Heart Failure Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Shortness of breath when active or at rest Shortness of breath, especially when active or during exercise
Shortness of breath when lying down or at night Chronic cough (dry or productive) with clear white, yellow, or greenish mucus
Wheezing & coughing Wheezing
Rapid or irregular heartbeat Chest congestion, tightness, discomfort
Swelling in your ankles & feet Unintended weight loss
Frequent urination especially at night Increased usage of short acting inhalers
Weight gain of 2-3 lbs/day or 5 lbs/week Frequent respiratory infections
Feeling fatigued or weak Feeling fatigued or weak

Preventing Emergency Room Visits and Hospitalizations

While you may not be able to prevent every return trip to the emergency room or hospital, there are some steps you can take to help minimize the possibility:

  • Patient Centered care: Effective communication and rapport between healthcare professionals and patients are crucial in preventing hospitalizations. Patients can have precipitating factors due to their other health conditions therefore reporting on signs and symptoms of worsening conditions are important as it would enable the health care provider to practice preventive medicine and construct appropriate treatment strategy after an effective patient assessment.
  • Medication Adherence: Being adherent to your medication therapy will prevent disease progression, hospitalizations, as well as additional health care costs.2 There are multiple tools and resources to help patients overcome barriers such as access to medicine, forgetfulness, improper administration technique, perceived side effects, cost, as well as understanding of their disease state and how to appropriately manage their condition. If you have any issues with adherence, make sure to inform your provider as effective communication will provide you optimal treatment.
  • Vaccines: COPD admissions are seasonal as studies show strong association with the flu season, however every patient is unique and can have worsened symptoms during seasonal changes, therefore it is highly recommended to get your flu and pneumonia vaccines to decrease chances of readmission.
  • Diet & Lifestyle Modifications:
    • CHF: Limit your salt and fluid intake, as increase in salt intake can pull water into your body and cause you to swell up. Therefore, it is crucial to weigh yourself every morning to ensure you do not gain more than 2-3 pounds in a day or 5 pounds in a week. If your medication or limited salt intake is not helping you control your fluids, seek your provider immediately as this is a sign for deteriorating CHF.
    • COPD: Current smokers should seek smoking cessation as it is the most effective in minimizing symptoms and risk for respiratory infections. Furthermore, COPD patients should avoid dust as well as indoor and outdoor air pollutants. Make sure to follow up with primary care provider within 7 days after discharge for lab tests and assessment to ensure
    • CHD: Controlling your blood pressure as well as your cholesterol will reduce the risk for heart attacks as well as stroke. For patients at a higher risk for heart attacks should have NTG sublingual tablets at hand and report to their provider if they start to experience chest pains more than usual as this can indicate a risk for another heart attack. Obesity is also associated with worsened cholesterol and high blood pressure therefore managing your weight as well as your disease states can put you at a lower risk for heart attacks and stroke.

If you’re having trouble managing your disease states, talk to your doctor for a referral to a dietician and/or lifestyle coach who can aid in minimizing your risk for readmissions.

 

References:

  1. Shafazand, Masoud et al. “Patients with Worsening Chronic Heart Failure Who Present to a Hospital Emergency Department Require Hospital Care.” BMC Research Notes5 (2012): 132. PMC. Web. 12 Oct. 2018. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3315737/
  2. Jimmy, Beena, and Jimmy Jose. “Patient Medication Adherence: Measures in Daily Practice.” Oman Medical Journal3 (2011): 155–159. PMC. Web. 12 Oct. 2018.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3191684/
  3. Ziaeian, Boback, and Gregg C. Fonarow. “The Prevention of Hospital Readmissions in Heart Failure.” Progress in cardiovascular diseases4 (2016): 379–385. PMC. Web. 12 Oct. 2018.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4783289/
  4. Simmering JE, Polgreen LA, Comellas AP, Cavanaugh JE, Polgreen PM. Identifying patients with COPD at high risk of readmission. Chronic Obstr Pulm Dis. 2016; 3(4): 729-738. doi: http://doi.org/10.15326/jcopdf.3.4.2016.0136

If you’re struggling to afford your medications,
visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you.
You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!

0 views

keep an eye on diabetes - scriptsave wellrx - blog image

by Pawel F. Kojs
University of Arizona College of Pharmacy

Living with diabetes is not an easy task, however, you are not alone. Roughly 415 million people across the world are affected with this disease. If you have diabetes, you should consider several things, such as lifestyle, medication adherence, and check-ups with your healthcare provider. These are important to make sure that your diabetes is controlled and doesn’t lead to a deterioration in your overall health. Keeping blood sugars controlled can prevent serious problems like diabetic cardiomyopathy, stroke, and atherosclerosis4. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound a cure.

Tests to Keep Your Diabetes in Check

According to Kaiser Permanente, there are several exams that a person living with Diabetes should consider1:

Weight and blood pressure: checked at every doctor’s visit.1

A1C (Glycosylated hemoglobin): This is a test that is meant to be done every three months. Blood test that shows your average blood sugar for the past two to three months. This is done by measuring the amount of glucose attached to your blood cells1.

The A1c target is usually less than 7% for people with diabetes. However, your provider will decide the ideal A1c target for you3.

Urine check: This annual test is done to look for small proteins which show signs of early kidney damage1.

Lipid blood test: This test performed once every two years checks the level of your triglycerides, total ( “good” and “bad” cholesterol)1.

The following tests are recommended to be checked every 2 years if you have Type 2 Diabetes with no symptoms, or had Type 1 Diabetes for more than 5 years1

Eye Exam: Diabetes can affect your vision. Exams checks for any nerve damage of the eye. If you have nerve damage of the eye then it is recommended to see the doctor yearly1.

According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines, pregnant women with preexisting type 1 or type 2 diabetes, the exam should be done in the first trimester. Patients should then be monitored at every trimester and for 1 year after giving birth2.

Foot Exam: Diabetes can affect your feet. This test performed at least annually is to examine the feet. Tests are done more often if you have any positive findings1. This checks for any numbness, sores, infections, and calluses1,3.

Vaccines: According to the ADA, vaccines are recommended for diabetic patients. The flu vaccine is recommended for all people greater than 6 months of age. A 3-dose series of Hepatitis B vaccine should be given to people ages 19-59. People over the age of 60 should be considered for a 3 dose Hepatitis B vaccine. A PPSV23 Vaccine is recommended for people between the ages of 2-64 years of age and after age 65, the PPSV23 vaccine is necessary even if you had a vaccine in the past2.

Diabetes management does not end in the doctor’s office. It all starts with the goals that you have set out for yourself. Whether it’s controlling your blood pressure or reducing your weight, this requires small and achievable goals. Set a goal too big and you will become overwhelmed. Talk over your goals with your healthcare provider. Putting in a consistent effort to maintain or achieve your diabetic goals will produce worthy results.

 

References:


If you’re struggling to afford your medications,
visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you.
You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!

0 views