Always ask the cash price - you could save on your prescriptions

The “he said/she said” of Rx pricing tools

If you’ve ever used a prescription price-check tool for an Rx savings program (like ScriptSave WellRx), only to have been told a different price when the time came to collect & pay for the prescription at the pharmacy, then the next few paragraphs are for you.

Regardless of the product or service, it’s an infuriating thing to be quoted one price online, but to then be confronted with a different reality at the store (unless, of course, the price comes down – then we love it).

What can be done to avoid bad price-quotes?

For patients using prescription savings programs, there are a few steps that can be taken to help reduce the potential for errors with an Rx price-check tool.

In short, there are some very important things to keep in mind when doing a price look-up with a prescription discount card and overlooking any single one of them has the potential to make a mess of things.

In no particular order, at ScriptSave WellRx we always recommend that our members keep the following pointers in mind:

    • Potential Problem #1
      Prescription prices can be volatile and it’s not uncommon to find regular (even daily) price changes across pharmacies in any given zip code.
    • Recommendation
      When using a price-check tool or mobile app to review the lowest prescription prices in your zip code, be sure to perform one final look-up on the same day that you end up collecting & paying for your script. As frustrating as it might be to discover that prices changed for your medication overnight, it’s far less frustrating to realize this before you leave home. Especially if you also discover that the same medication actually came down in price at a different pharmacy nearby (perhaps even giving you the opportunity to make arrangements to transfer the prescription).

     

    • Potential Problem #2
      Prescription medications come in many different strengths, forms, quantities, etc. There’s also the matter of brands & generics. However, a price-check tool for a prescriptions savings card like ScriptSave WellRx has to start somewhere – and the default settings on the website will generally only return pricing results for one very specific version of each medication. For example, perhaps the price-check tool will show results for the most commonly filled strength, quantity, form and manufacturer of the medication that you’re searching for.
    • Recommendation
      When the results of your price-check are returned by the website or mobile app, ALWAYS take a few minutes to review the details against the details on your prescription … and make the necessary manual changes (if any are needed) using the drop-down menus that determine the drug’s Strength, Quantity, Form, Brand/Generic, etc. (see Fig.1)

     

    FIGURE 1
    ask cash price filter - results image

    • Potential Problem #3
      Your pharmacist does not recognize or is not familiar with your prescription savings card.
    • Recommendation
      If you’re using the ScriptSave WellRx card or mobile app, you can be confident that if your pharmacy showed up in our price-check tool, it’s more than likely that we have a contract with them to accept your savings card. We do our best to keep our database up-to-date so as not to send members on a wild goose chase. Perhaps the best way to approach using a ScriptSave WellRx card is to do so with confidence. Although this program is NOT insurance, an Rx savings card includes the same pharmacy processing information that pharmacists see & use every day on all the different insurance cards they deal with. That being case, simply hand your ScriptSave WellRx card to the pharmacist, point to where the card shows the Rx BIN, Rx PCN, etc. and ask,

    “Would you please process my prescription using these details and let me know what my out-of-pocket cost will be?”

    U.S. Based Call Center Support

    Another useful hint to keep in mind is that all ScriptSave WellRx members are serviced by a toll-free customer support number (staffed by real people right here in the U.S.). If you ever have a problem, you can call the support line toll-free at 1-800-407-8156, Monday through Friday, from 9am to 8pm EST, and our friendly staff will be glad to help get to the bottom of any issues. Given the real-time need that many patients face with filling their prescriptions, if you’ve had issues at a particular pharmacy in the past, it might be helpful to call our support staff ahead of your next visit to fill your prescription. If necessary, our staff may be able to call your pharmacy on your behalf – ahead of your visit – so that everything is smoothed out before you arrive to pick-up and pay.

    Final Thought – Love your Pharmacist (and Always Ask the Cash Price)

    Please always keep in mind that pharmacists have a LOT going on and they can be incredibly busy. Although they can make it look simple at times, that’s generally a reflection of their professionalism & experience, and their role in a patient’s healthcare is not to be underestimated. Pharmacists are a truly valuable resource and they juggle a lot of different tasks. If you meet a pharmacist who looks at your prescription savings card and doesn’t immediately recognize it, don’t be surprised. We can’t expect every pharmacist, at every pharmacy, to recognize and remember every single savings card and insurance program that they have a contract with. More often than not, if you ask your pharmacist (politely) to try processing your prescription using the details on the card, they will be happy to give it a try. If that doesn’t work, and if you’re using a card from ScriptSave, you have a tollfree support number to call for assistance.

    As for “Always Ask the Cash Price” … that’s a must-do for patients who don’t want to over-pay (especially for those WITH prescription insurance). For more insights on this, read our blog post on why you should Always Ask the Cash Price.


    Download the free WellRx app from the iOS app store or the Google Play Store,
    and get registered to take advantage of our free medication adherence tools.

    If you’re struggling to afford your medications,
    visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you.
    You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!

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WNCT9 prescription savings story

GREENVILLE N.C. (WNCT) – Pharmacy prices can differ from store to store and should be treated like buying a car.

Most people think of just going to the pharmacy closest to them instead of looking around for their medication.

When in reality, it can differ by sometimes a significant amount.

There are different ways that you can go about finding these prices.

Certain apps will bring up every pharmacy within a number of miles of your current location.

From there, you type in the medication that you’re looking for and all of the prices will come up right in front of you.

A creator of one of those apps says he looks for the cheapest prices for everything else – so why not do it for our medication.

“Any pharmacies have an in store savings program for low cost drugs,” said Shawn Ohri, creator of ScriptSave WellRx. “But it doesn’t mean all drugs are low cost at that pharmacy, they’re bringing in a good number of prescriptions at a low cost but there may be others that don’t have a low cost.”

You can find apps like this in the Apple Store or the Google Play Store.

Some are free and others require a subscription.

9 On Your Side looked up some of the top medications used in Greenville and found a difference of almost $30 in some of the different locations, showing it really does work to look before you shop.

Top 10 Drugs (non-controls)  Greenville, NC
Reporting Period: Jan 2017 – June 2017
Date Prepared: 07/27/2017
Rank Drug     Lowest Pharmacy
1 AMLODIPINE BESYLATE     Harris Teeter Pharmacy
2 Generic form of Norvasc (High blood pressure, chest pain)

ATORVASTATIN CALCIUM

    Hometown Discount Pharmacy of Greenville
3 Generic form of Lipitor (High Cholesterol)

HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE

    Harris Teeter Pharmacy
4 Waterpill/Diuretic (High blood pressure and fluid retention)

METOPROLOL SUCCINATE

    Rite Aid Pharmacy
5 Generic form of Toprol (High blood pressure, chest pain, and heart failure)

GABAPENTIN

    Rite Aid Pharmacy
6 Generic form of Neurontin (Nerve pain medication – very common)

METOPROLOL TARTRATE

    Walmart Pharmacy
7 Generic form of Lopressor (High blood pressure, chest pain, and heart failure)

LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM

    Walmart Pharmacy
8 Generic form of Synthroid (Thyroid hormone)

SERTRALINE HCL

    Harris Teeter Pharmacy
9 Generic form of Zoloft (Anxiety/Deperession)

LISINOPRIL

    Harris Teeter Pharmacy
10 Very common heart failure / high blood pressure medication.

PREDNISONE  Steroid used for inflammation.

    Walmart Pharmacy
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Emergency Preparedness - medications, ScriptSave WellRx

by Leah Samera
University of Arizona College of Pharmacy
PharmD Candidate, Class of 2018

Ready, a public service campaign designed to educate and empower citizens to prepare for emergencies such as natural and man-made disasters, proclaims September to be National Preparedness Month (NPM). In the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey and in anticipation of Hurricane Irma, you may be wondering how to go about preparing for such events. This is especially important to consider if you have a chronic disease or condition.

Illness Follows Disaster

Studies have found that upwards of 70% of the Hurricane Katrina survivors had at least one chronic condition. Additionally, 58% of the visits to emergency treatment facilities in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina were due to illness, 24% of which were associated with chronic diseases. The research on disasters’ effects on chronically ill patients only serves to reinforce the fact that these emergency situations can lead to both exacerbation and death from chronic illnesses due to direct stress of the disaster, interruption of care, or both.

Emergency Plans and Kits

Organizations like the American Red Cross recommend having an emergency plan and kit prepared for use during a disaster. Some obvious items that should be included in such a kit are water, food, and first aid supplies. However, it is also critical that you have a 7-day supply of your medications on hand as well as any other tools or devices used for your health such as hearing aids with extra batteries, syringes, blood pressure cuffs, et cetera. In order to have at least a 7-day supply of your medications, you must order refills of your prescription medications as soon as you are able rather than before you run out. It is best to keep these items together and in a location that is easy to get to in an emergency.

Planning Ahead

Medications should be stored away from heat, light, and moisture; if possible, keep them in their original bottles and store the bottles in a waterproof bag or container. If you have medications such as insulin that need refrigeration, have a freezer pack and cooler available. It is also important to stay up-to-date on all immunizations, including tetanus, especially if you have diabetes. Additionally, because the stress of these disasters can exacerbate your conditions, it is best to also make appropriate lifestyle changes such as restricting salt intake if you have high blood pressure or learning the carbohydrate counting approach if you have diabetes.

Other Handy Emergency Items

Other items that you should have handy in case of an emergency include any over-the-counter medications you may need like pain relievers, as well as your medication list and insurance card. It is important to keep an up-to-date medication list that not only catalogs the names of your current medications but also their strengths, indications, directions, and prescribers; any bad or allergic reactions you may have had to medications in the past should also be documented. Your prescription benefit card may be needed for approval of an emergency supply if you run out of or lose your medications, or if your medications get damaged or contaminated.

In the event that you end up requiring medications and health resources:

  • RxOpen.org maps open and closed pharmacies, American Red Cross shelters, and infusion centers in areas affected by disasters.
  • The charity Direct Relief provides free prescription drugs and medical supplies to low-income patients at community health centers or clinics.
  • Keep a list of nearby pharmacies and hospitals as well as their phone numbers.

By doing what you can to prepare for disasters, you can lower your risk of exacerbations of your health conditions. As the theme for NPM states: “Disasters Don’t Plan Ahead. You Can.”

References:

  • National Preparedness Month. https://www.ready.gov/september. Accessed September 7, 2017.
  • Kessler RC, Hurricane Katrina Community Advisory Group Hurricane Katrina’s impact on the care of survivors with chronic medical conditions. J Gen Intern Med. 2007;22(9):1225–1230. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2219784. Accessed September 8, 2017.
  • Sharma AJ, Weiss EC, Young SL, et al. Chronic disease and related conditions at emergency treatment facilities in the New Orleans area after Hurricane Katrina. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2008;2(1):27–32. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18388655. Accessed September 8, 2017.
  • Be Prepared for an Emergency. Be Red Cross Ready! http://www.redcross.org/get-help/prepare-for-emergencies/be-red-cross-ready/get-a-kit. Accessed September 7, 2017.
  • Emergency Preparedness for Prescription Medications. http://www.mayo.edu/pmts/mc6000-mc6099/mc6012-39.pdf. Published 2016. Accessed September 7, 2017.

Are you concerned Hurricane Irma
may impact your prescription refills?
The State Law may be on your side; early refills are permissible.

For medications not covered by insurance,
the ScriptSave® WellRx program is here to help.

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Savings card vs. savings coupon image scriptsave wellrx

What’s in a name and why does it matter?

Although many patients tend to think of the ScriptSave WellRx program as a coupon for their meds, your free prescription savings card is actually a lot more powerful.

In addition to the obvious differences, like the fact that you would normally only get to use a regular coupon for one transaction (related to just one very specific product, as stated on the face of the coupon), there are some additional and very important features that make for big differences between an Rx discount card (like ScriptSave WellRx) and a coupon.

Here are a couple of important things to keep in mind. Understanding these differences will also help to explain why an insurance provider can’t allow you use the ScriptSave discount in addition to their own reduced rates, or why a pharmaceutical manufacturer won’t allow you to apply their copay savings program together with our low prices.

  • A regular coupon works by lowering the end-price of a product, cutting it by the exact amount shown on the coupon. The coupon has a fixed value, and the retailer will subtract that fixed value from the current sales price. For example, the regular coupon might say, “Take $5 off the price of XYZ.” When this happens, the savvy consumer might decide to shop around in order to find the store that sells this product for the very lowest price…THEN s/he will receive an additional $5 off that lowest price upon surrendering the coupon.
  • In contrast, what we do with the ScriptSave WellRx program is to negotiate lower final costs for each specific medication. We don’t negotiate a fixed coupon value. Instead, we negotiate a final discounted price. This is a subtle but important difference. With our program we’re saying, “We can get you a specific medication for a negotiated final price of $X.” This being the case, if the patient can find a pharmacy that will fill their prescription for a final out-of-pocket cost that’s lower than our negotiated price (perhaps as a result of the drug being on a low copay list with their insurer), they may not want to use their Rx discount card for that particular medication. Meanwhile, the same patient may have a second prescription that’s not covered by insurance and where the ScriptSave out-of-pocket cost is the lowest discounted price available…in which case one script gets filled with ScriptSave and the other does not.

Can it be used with insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, etc.?

Here’s another example to help illustrate. We’ll start by laying out three basic pricing options for filling a prescription at a given pharmacy…

  1. An insurance policy (including Medicare and Medicaid) includes a list of drugs (known as the Formulary) for which covered patients will pay a predetermined negotiated rate.
  2. Similar to the prescription drug formulary at an insurance company, the contracts that ScriptSave has negotiated with its pharmacy partners also result in pre-determined out-of-pocket costs. These rates are available to ANY patient who chooses to pay cash.
  3. At the same time, a generic drug list at a retail pharmacy shows the final prices for certain drugs at that pharmacy.

Of the three pricing options listed above, a patient is free to choose the price that makes the most sense for each of the prescriptions they are filling. However, this is a one-or-other choice. There’s simply no way to “stack/combine” the savings from an insurance payer together with the savings from a cash discount card, because the prices being offered under each option are contractually agreed and final.

Another way to put this is to say that, in the world of a regular coupon, the value of the coupon is always the same no matter which store it gets redeemed it at. Therefore, the final out-of-pocket cost for any product that has a coupon will vary based on how much the store is selling the product for in the first place. Meanwhile, an Rx savings card like the ScriptSave WellRx card will deliver a fixed final out-of-pocket cost (and so it’s the value of the discount that changes with every prescription being filled, relative to the original cash price for the drug in question).

In short, prescription savings programs are NOT coupons. While it might be easy to think of them in this way (and you may even hear us refer to them as such), it’s important to keep the differences in mind. Furthermore, you’ll want to choose your savings program based on its reputation and relationship with pharmacies … because it’s these relationships that matter when it comes time for the pharmacist to honor the savings card or mobile app.

As part of the Medical Security Card Company and ScriptSave suite of pharmacy programs, the ScriptSave WellRx program boasts well over 20 years (founded in 1994) of history and relationships with our pharmacy partners. We believe this helps make ScriptSave WellRx second-to-none.


Download the free WellRx app from the iOS app store or the Google Play Store,
and get registered to take advantage of our free medication adherence tools.
If you’re struggling to afford your medications,
visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you.
You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!

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high medication prices image

by Leah Samera
University of Arizona College of Pharmacy
PharmD Candidate, Class of 2018

It’s one of the most common questions we hear at ScriptSave: “Why are prescription medications so expensive?” With insurance deductibles going up and insurance companies providing less reimbursement, drug prices are outpacing the inflation rate. So why do drug companies continue to charge exorbitant prices for medications? The simple answer is, because they can.

There are a number of factors that affect the cost of medications. In the United States, drug costs are vastly higher relative to other countries. What sets the U.S. apart is that drug manufacturing companies are permitted to set their own price for a given prescription drug. Conversely, in countries with national health insurance systems, a separate organization negotiates drug prices or rejects coverage if the manufacturer proposes what is felt to be an excessive cost.

Market Exclusivity

The reason why brand name drug manufacturers are able to set such high prices in the United States is because they are “protected” from competition, and they have a lot of negotiating power; this leads to those manufacturers having market exclusivity. Market exclusivity is when the FDA allows a manufacturer to market their drug without generic competition. According to Kesselheim, et al. the median length of post-approval market exclusivity is 12.5 years for widely used drugs and 14.5 years for highly innovative, first-in-class drugs.

New medications are automatically protected from generic competition for anywhere between 5 and 12 years. On top of that, manufacturers may also receive patents that can last 20+ years. These companies can even extend their patent period by testing in children through the pediatric exclusivity program. They can also apply for additional patents on nontherapeutic aspects of a drug, such as the method of administration, coating, and formulation. Manufacturers can thus periodically implement and patent small changes to a drug, thus prolonging their market exclusivity.

Pay for Delay

Aside from legal protection, some brand-name manufacturers have historically negotiated with and offered financial incentives to generic manufacturers to defer introduction of a generic product until a later time; this is referred to as pay for delay. Some brand-name manufacturers have even paid generic manufacturers to cancel introduction of their generic product altogether. Brand-name manufacturers have also offered rebates to third party administrators of prescription drug plans to promote their product versus others in its class.

What About Generic Drugs?

Generic products can become expensive as well because, for some drugs, there is lack of motivation to create additional generic competitors. The number of generic manufacturers for a given drug depends on factors such as the size of the target population for the drug, availability of ingredients, and mergers in the industry. Those generic manufacturers with little competition may then raise prices.

Dispense As Written

It is also important to note that there are several laws and people involved in the process of writing and distributing a prescription medication. Physicians write prescriptions, pharmacists fill and sell prescription medications, and patients and/or insurers pay for said medications. The separation in these roles can often lead to physicians being unaware of drug prices and therefore not taking this consideration into account in clinical decision making. Several states also may not require pharmacists to conduct generic substitution, and all states allow physicians to write dispense as written prescriptions that pharmacists cannot substitute with a generic product.

How to Save Money on Prescription Drugs

Fortunately, the ScriptSave WellRx prescription savings program offers instant prescription discounts at the register on both brand name and generic prescription medications. Over 62,000 pharmacies across the U.S. participate, and there’s no enrollment fee or usage limits. Although there are many forces in the market that increase drug costs, ScriptSave WellRx delivers prescription savings solutions that can help you and everyone in your household save money on medications — even pets!

Registered members have access to a free suite of personal wellness tools in the Medicine Chest, including:

  • Ask a Pharmacist
  • Pill Reminders
  • Refill Reminders
  • Medication Information (in both English and Spanish)
  • Medication Videos
  • Mood-tracking (to review side effects, etc.)
  • Price-check and Pharmacy Locator

Download the free WellRx app from the iOS app store or the Google Play Store, and get registered to take advantage of our free medication adherence tools. If you’re struggling to afford your medications, visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you. You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!

References:

  • Kesselheim AS, Avorn J, Sarpatwari A. The high cost of prescription drugs in the United States: origins and prospects for reform. JAMA 2016; 316:858–871. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27552619
  • https://www.wellrx.com/faq

For the best Rx price on
prescription medications,
visit www.WellRx.com.
Compare prices at more than
62,000 pharmacies nationwide.

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save money on prescriptions

wabc prescription savings storyby Nina Peneda

We price compare for everything from shoes to SUV’s. So why not for medicine? Especially for those uninsured, there are way to save thousands a year. Shrinking your pill bill may start with a few clicks. ScriptSave WellRx compared the generic form of the cholesterol drug, Crestor (rosuvastatin calcium), across the tri-state area.

It could cost you as much as $105.77 for a 10mg month’s supply but according to SciptSave WellRx, using it’s service and savings card, you could price shop that cash, no insurance price down to $16.70. A savings of $89.07.

Be a Smart Healthcare Consumer

“It just pays to be a smart consumer, even in healthcare, you need to be a healthcare consumer, instead of a healthcare patient,” said Shawn Ohri, of ScriptSave WellRx.

Big box stores, groceries and drug stores all offer membership clubs and discount cards to save on the sky-rocketing cost of medicine.

Free memberships in online services like ScriptSave WellRx, websites that provide coupons and negotiate discounts with pharmacies, allow your fingers to do the walking before you do the running around.

“There are many cases where we can actually beat your insurance co-pay, or if you’re in a high deductible health plan there are many cases where our price may be lower,” Ohri said.

For example, according to ScriptSave WellRx, in the low-income areas of the Bronx, the generic version of the popular sleep aid, Lunesta, for someone with no insurance can cost six times more at one store than at a pharmacy less than a mile away.

At Us Pharmacy lab in Northvale, New Jersey, Pharmacist David Yoon feels the comparison services are a good starting point for consumers looking to save.

“It’s not 100-percent accurate, but it gives you a ball park figure who’s cheapest in your neighborhood,” Yoon said.

Ohri suggests always calling the pharmacy to get an updated actual price. And, most importantly, steer clear of expensive name brand medication if it’s okay with your doctor to use the generic form.

“The price difference is astronomical. Sometimes the brand names can cost 50 to 100 times more, especially in the cases where you don’t have insurance,” Yoon said.

Pharmacists also recommend no matter where you are filling your scripts, consider the relationship with the provider and the safety which comes with having all your records on file.

The big takeaway: There are other ways to save. Ask your pharmacy what the cash or retail price of your prescription is it just might beat your insurance price. Price match. If you see a lower price somewhere else, ask your pharmacy to match or beat it. If they want to keep your business they will. And ask your doctor about an assistance program. If you qualify, you could get the prescription for free.

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PIX 11 News - Prescription Savings image

by Kirstin Cole, PIX 11 News, New York

Unlock secret savings on prescriptionsIt’s a growing strain on our bottom line:  more Americans taking ever more prescribed medications and spending more of their income to do it.

The toll is evident, as one in 10 of us can’t afford our medications and are simply going without.  It’s what’s inspired one group to use the insider info they gained working in the pharmaceutical business to beat the drug sellers at their own game.

Here’s how to unlock your own secret savings, necessary since prescription pills are a daily way of life for nearly 60 percent of Americans, and it’s pricey.

Natalie Stelzer of Brooklyn Heights was blunt: “They are off the charts.  So expensive. Co-pays are dismal.”

Even as politicians in Washington duke it out over health care reform, Americans continue to spend more on medications — up to a  projected $457 billion in 2015, and rising.

Robert Gibbons of Brooklyn Heights worries as he sees what his mother faces when it comes to her prescription dugs.  He sums it up as  “backward and profiteering.”

That’s where  ScriptSave WellRx comes in.

Shawn Ohri and his team decided to tackle it.  They’re insiders who’ve worked with pharmacies and drug makers for decades, and they’re committed to bringing savings to consumers.

“Customers can save up 80 percent off retail cost of prescriptions.  In 2016  we saved 1.3 billion dollars on their prescription costs.”

The comparison shopping all happens on their app and website, ScriptSave WellRx, and the savings can be stunning.

We comparison shopped for Crestor, the cholesterol drug, using the area around PIX11 in midtown.  Within a few blocks we found it for as little as $18, and all the way up to $239.

Whether with insurance, or without, Ohri’s company uses bulk buying of medicines to negotiate cheaper prices on drugs, often beating your insurance company’s pricing.

Other secret ways to save? Picking up one prescription where you grocery shop, another might be cheaper at the drug store, and yet another at a big box chain. The app does the leg work for you, wherever you live, work or shop.

Ohri explained that, “On top of that you are going to get our discount because of our group volume.  We’ve done all the negotiating with pharmacies.”

And with these negotiations, we all come out healthier winners.

See the entire story on Pix11.com.

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pill boxes medication adherence

If your doctor has prescribed a medication for you, you want to be sure you’re getting the most benefit from that drug. Medication adherence is important to get the most benefit from the medications used to treat your condition. The causes of non-adherence, when a patient either accidentally or knowingly does not take medications as prescribed, can be complex. Non-adherence is often the result of cost; patients who simply can’t afford their medications. However, good habits and a good understanding of the medication can also be a big part of adherence, and can help you stick to your medication schedule.

Medication Adherence

World Health Organization defined adherence as “the extent to which a person’s behavior – taking medication, following a diet, and/or executing lifestyle changes, corresponds with agreed recommendations from a health care provider.” The concept that healthcare professionals manage medical conditions is true only in case of hospitalized patients. The bottom line is, medications don’t work in patients who don’t take them, or don’t take them as prescribed.

In an outpatient setting, the healthcare professionals’ role is limited to providing products (medications and/or monitoring devices) and educational tools. Taking medications, on time and properly, is left up to the patient or their in-home caregiver. There are several techniques to help you remember to take your medications as prescribed and manage their own medical condition. As the patient, you have the ultimate control for safe and effective treatment.

Two Steps to Medication Adherence
Adherence to medication can be achieved in two simple steps; understanding and behavior changes. Understanding includes knowledge of your medical condition and how your prescribed medication can help to manage it. Here are a few helpful websites:

  1. http://www.patienteducationcenter.org/ – The health-related content on the website is provided by Harvard Medical School. Medical conditions are listed alphabetically from A to Z.
  2. https://medlineplus.gov/ – Produced by the National Library of Medicine, provides reliable information on medical conditions, drugs, herbs, and supplements.
  3. https://www.wellrx.com/ – ScriptSave® WellRx allows you to search for the lowest prices on prescription medications at nearby pharmacies, and provides overviews of the medications. Our Ask a Pharmacist phone line lets you talk to a pharmacist about prescription medicines, dosing, or medication interaction questions. Registered members have access to a free suite of personal wellness tools in the Medicine Chest, including:
  • Ask a Pharmacist
  • Pill Reminders
  • Refill Reminders
  • Medication Information (in both English and Spanish)
  • Medication Videos
  • Mood-tracking (to review side effects, etc.)
  • Price-check and Pharmacy Locator

Behavioral changes mean finding ways to stay on track with your medication schedule. Finding the right tool or a combination of methods that fit best your lifestyle is key to medication adherence. Here are some ways to stay on track:

  1. Integrate your medication to your daily routine, such as brushing your teeth or watching your favorite TV show.
  2. Set one/multiple daily alarm using a clock, mobile phone, or computer.
  3. Ask a family member and/or friend give you a call remainder.
  4. Pill boxes are another way to organize your scheduled medications. Pill boxes are available in different forms that allow you/your caregiver to fill them daily, weekly, or even monthly.
  5. Medication charts can be developed by own or with the help of a healthcare professional. Keep an updated chart with medication names, dose, when you take them, and what are you taking them for. You can refer to the chart if you get confused with your medications.
  6. Plan ahead for medication refills and mark a calendar to make sure you always have your medication when necessary.
  7. If you have a smart phone, the free ScriptSave WellRx app can be used to remind you to take your medications, refill your medications, and track how the medications make you feel.

We hope these tips on medication adherence have helped. Download our free app from the iOS app store or the Google Play Store, and get registered to take advantage of our free medication adherence tools. If you’re struggling to afford your medications, visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you. You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!


For the best Rx price on
prescription medications,
visit www.WellRx.com.
Compare prices at more than
62,000 pharmacies nationwide.

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Zollinger-Ellison syndrome - stomach image

by Derek Matlock, PharmD

What is Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome?

Do you suffer from Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES)? If so, you may be in rare company. According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome is a rare disorder. It occurs in about one in every 1 million people. Normally, when we eat, our body releases a hormone called gastrin, which tells your stomach to make acid to help break down foods and liquids. For patients with ZES, this mechanism is disrupted by tumors or “gastrinomas.” These tumors form in the pancreas or upper small intestine and secrete abnormally large amounts of gastrin from tumors, resulting in peptic ulcers to be formed.

It Might Be Your Genes

Some people with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome may go undiagnosed as the disorder is rare and its cause is not clear. In 75% of cases, ZES is sporadic or random, whereas in 25% it is associated with MEN 1, an inherited condition characterized by pancreatic endocrine tumors, pituitary tumors, and hyperparathyroidism.  Therefore, your doctor may perform a thorough medical and family history to help diagnose ZES. Additional tests may include endoscopy or various imaging and blood tests. They may even measure the amount of acid in your stomach. For patients with sporadic ZES, the most common symptom is abdominal pain. While patients with the inherited form of ZES mostly complain of diarrhea. Other symptoms include, heartburn, nausea, vomiting, stomach bleeding, and weight loss.

Managing Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome

Currently, the goal of managing ZES is to limit complications of the disorder by suppressing acid secretions. Thus, the main medications used in ZES are proton pump inhibitors, or PPIs, like omeprazole (Prilosec®) or pantoprazole (Protonix®), prescribed at high doses. For patients who do not respond to treatment with PPIs, octreotide is used, which stops the secretion of gastrin, the hormone that tells our body to secrete acid for food breakdown. Currently, the only cure for ZES is surgical removal of the tumor or tumors, but this may not be an option in cases where the tumors have spread to other parts of the body. In that case, chemotherapy with medications like streptozotocin, 5-fluorouracil, and doxorubicin are used to shrink tumors.

Zollinger-Ellison syndrome is a rare disorder that may be suspected in patients with multiple or repeat peptic ulcers. Currently, medications like proton pump inhibitors are the main treatment option, while surgery and chemotherapy are options in certain patients. Remember, when taking proton pump inhibitors, they are best taken 30-60 minutes before a meal and may also come with their own unfavorable side effects. Be sure to talk to your doctor or pharmacist about what can be done to best optimize your treatment options for ZES.

Resources:

  1. Medscape: Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome
  2. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome
  3. UpToDate: Management and Prognosis of the Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome

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Doctor speaking to patient about medications

TUCSON, AZ–(Marketwired – Aug 9, 2017) – VUCA Health announced today that ScriptSave, a provider of prescription savings solutions and decision support tools helping close the gaps in prescription coverage, will employ its on-demand medication video library to improve medication information and drive better care outcomes for ScriptSave WellRx members.

ScriptSave’s prescription savings program, along with VUCA’s innovative video service, will work together to increase prescription medication adherence by providing patient education in an easy to consume format, thus improving care while enhancing and simplifying the member experience.

Improving Medication Adherence

“It is well documented that two of the key pillars for medication adherence are providing access to affordable medications and the information they need to feel empowered about taking them,” said Shawn Ohri, Vice President, Business Development, ScriptSave. “By implementing VUCA’s on-demand video library, our members can receive accurate health information, in a format that is easy to understand and accessible anytime, anywhere.”

In partnering with VUCA, ScriptSave WellRx members will have access to a robust library of prescription-specific video briefings that deliver information on top-prescribed medications, including proper usage, expected benefits and potential side effects. The videos, available in English and Spanish, are integrated into the ScriptSave WellRx mobile app and website.

“VUCA’s innovative visual education paired with the latest advances in technology is helping individuals across the United States understand how to practice safe administration of their prescription medication,” said VUCA Health CEO David Medvedeff, PharmD, MBA. “By coupling this service with applications like ScriptSave WellRx, members can instantly access their medication information and leverage valuable resources to enhance their overall medication experience.”

About ScriptSave

For more than two decades, ScriptSave has been closing the gaps in healthcare and prescription coverage with innovative savings programs, like ScriptSave WellRx, for the uninsured, under-insured, and insured. Pharmacies, employers, health plans, and other organizations across the nation rely on ScriptSave to deliver prescription savings to their members and customers — yielding $1.3 billion in consumer savings in 2016 alone.

ScriptSave WellRx is recognized and approved by the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy® (NABP®). Our pharmacy recognition lets consumers know that ScriptSave WellRx meets standards set by a global coalition that includes International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) and NABP, which has supported the United States boards of pharmacy in their goal of protecting the public health since 1904.

ScriptSave is a member of the MedImpact, Inc. family of companies. For more information, visit www.wellrx.com. Follow us: @SSWellRx (Twitter), Scriptsavewellrx (Facebook).

About VUCA Health

Based in Lake Mary, Fla., VUCA Health (www.vucahealth.com) provides a gateway to patient engagement that serves as an on-demand extension of pharmacists and other healthcare providers. The company’s MedsOnCue solution leverages advanced mobile, web and on-demand video and communication technologies to deliver trusted patient information that enhances the medication use process. It offers a convenient and cost-effective way for clients to provide on-demand patient medication information and strengthen customer connections with video briefings, web messaging, reminders and alerts and a host of other customizable services that extend and enhance the patient relationship.

Contact Information

You can find the original press release here.


For the best prescription savings
on medications,
visit www.WellRx.com.
Compare prices at more than
62,000 pharmacies nationwide.

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