Drug Costs

Prescription Savings Cards vs. Coupons

Savings card vs. savings coupon image scriptsave wellrx

What’s in a name and why does it matter?

Although many patients tend to think of the ScriptSave WellRx program as a coupon for their meds, your free prescription savings card is actually a lot more powerful.

In addition to the obvious differences, like the fact that you would normally only get to use a regular coupon for one transaction (related to just one very specific product, as stated on the face of the coupon), there are some additional and very important features that make for big differences between an Rx discount card (like ScriptSave WellRx) and a coupon.

Here are a couple of important things to keep in mind. Understanding these differences will also help to explain why an insurance provider can’t allow you use the ScriptSave discount in addition to their own reduced rates, or why a pharmaceutical manufacturer won’t allow you to apply their copay savings program together with our low prices.

  • A regular coupon works by lowering the end-price of a product, cutting it by the exact amount shown on the coupon. The coupon has a fixed value, and the retailer will subtract that fixed value from the current sales price. For example, the regular coupon might say, “Take $5 off the price of XYZ.” When this happens, the savvy consumer might decide to shop around in order to find the store that sells this product for the very lowest price…THEN s/he will receive an additional $5 off that lowest price upon surrendering the coupon.
  • In contrast, what we do with the ScriptSave WellRx program is to negotiate lower final costs for each specific medication. We don’t negotiate a fixed coupon value. Instead, we negotiate a final discounted price. This is a subtle but important difference. With our program we’re saying, “We can get you a specific medication for a negotiated final price of $X.” This being the case, if the patient can find a pharmacy that will fill their prescription for a final out-of-pocket cost that’s lower than our negotiated price (perhaps as a result of the drug being on a low copay list with their insurer), they may not want to use their Rx discount card for that particular medication. Meanwhile, the same patient may have a second prescription that’s not covered by insurance and where the ScriptSave out-of-pocket cost is the lowest discounted price available…in which case one script gets filled with ScriptSave and the other does not.

Can it be used with insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, etc.?

Here’s another example to help illustrate. We’ll start by laying out three basic pricing options for filling a prescription at a given pharmacy…

  1. An insurance policy (including Medicare and Medicaid) includes a list of drugs (known as the Formulary) for which covered patients will pay a predetermined negotiated rate.
  2. Similar to the prescription drug formulary at an insurance company, the contracts that ScriptSave has negotiated with its pharmacy partners also result in pre-determined out-of-pocket costs. These rates are available to ANY patient who chooses to pay cash.
  3. At the same time, a generic drug list at a retail pharmacy shows the final prices for certain drugs at that pharmacy.

Of the three pricing options listed above, a patient is free to choose the price that makes the most sense for each of the prescriptions they are filling. However, this is a one-or-other choice. There’s simply no way to “stack/combine” the savings from an insurance payer together with the savings from a cash discount card, because the prices being offered under each option are contractually agreed and final.

Another way to put this is to say that, in the world of a regular coupon, the value of the coupon is always the same no matter which store it gets redeemed it at. Therefore, the final out-of-pocket cost for any product that has a coupon will vary based on how much the store is selling the product for in the first place. Meanwhile, an Rx savings card like the ScriptSave WellRx card will deliver a fixed final out-of-pocket cost (and so it’s the value of the discount that changes with every prescription being filled, relative to the original cash price for the drug in question).

In short, prescription savings programs are NOT coupons. While it might be easy to think of them in this way (and you may even hear us refer to them as such), it’s important to keep the differences in mind. Furthermore, you’ll want to choose your savings program based on its reputation and relationship with pharmacies … because it’s these relationships that matter when it comes time for the pharmacist to honor the savings card or mobile app.

As part of the Medical Security Card Company and ScriptSave suite of pharmacy programs, the ScriptSave WellRx program boasts well over 20 years (founded in 1994) of history and relationships with our pharmacy partners. We believe this helps make ScriptSave WellRx second-to-none.


Download the free WellRx app from the iOS app store or the Google Play Store,
and get registered to take advantage of our free medication adherence tools.
If you’re struggling to afford your medications,
visit www.WellRx.com to compare the cash price at pharmacies near you.
You may find prices lower than your insurance co-pay!